Date   

Re: 10" Toolroom Lathe

amvskd
 

Hey guys thanks for the advice, I wasn't quite sure what I was up
against here. I can borrow a friends 6x10 trailer with dump bed, I
think that would be a little better idea. Also I have access to a
Kubota with a front end bucket to off load if necessary What would
you guess the lathe and the cabinet separated weigh it at, it is
about a 4 foot bed I am told??. I am in the proses of building a
house and have wanted a full size lathe for quit a while and finally
have the space.



- In southbendlathe@..., "Clive Foster"
<clive_foster@...> wrote:

Arnie S I'm not but a friend and I bought my Heavy 10 home and
installed
it using engine hoist supplemented muscle power. Mine is mid
1950's build
on a full cabinet base. Hoist was a fold up type so it could be
taken to the job.

Our procedure was to remove a few easy off things such as
tailstock and
top-slide. Split the belt and unbolt the lathe from the bench so
it could
be easily lifted by the engine hoist and swung into the van.
Base went out to van on rollers, was swung on end vertical, van
backed up
so that base could be "tilt and hoiked" in with the aid of the
hoist.

Reversed procedure at other end to remove.
Due to access problems we couldn't use the hoist to put the lathe
back on
the bench so but I was able to put it on another bench of slightly
greater
height close by so we were able to swivel and slide the main lathe
real
close and just carry across the gangway sorta one end at a time.
Would've been safer to use a plank, loading ramp or whatever to
slide all the way but, as both friend and I can lift over a
hundredweight
from ground level solo, we had no problems simply holding it at
height
and lowering.

If you haven't got the gear a coupla three skateboards or roller
skates
can be very handy under things. If you go the de-mount route its a
lot easier if you have strong tables, trestles or whatever so you
don't
have to put it right at ground level.
Oh and don't lift by the changewheel cover!
Best way to lift is with proper eye(s) and block(s) clamped to the
bed.
Easy to make if you can get access beforehand.

HTH.

Clive

"Dennis Turk" <dennis.turk2@> wrote:

Yes you could but they better be four Arnold S. clones or his
equivalent. That is when he was in his prime. Really you need
an
overhead hoist or engine hoist even a car tow truck with a
boom.
Don't try and take it off the truck by hand or it will be
broken.
Maybe you to.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "amvskd" <amvskd@> wrote:

Hello,
Am new here and have a few questions about a 10" south Bend
tool
room lathe I am going to look at and possibly purchase. I have
not
worked with anything bigger than one of the 7X12 imports since
high
school shop class. So my question is, what is it going to
take to
move this size lathe or more so what is the est weight of a
heavy
10??
There is a forklift to load it but can 4 guys muscle it off s
pickup
truck??


Re: Lathe in my Cellar

jon_howell_a
 

I think the 'S' refers to the Southbend Logo not the model. Look
carefully, it says Twins in the centre, fererring to the founders of
SB. Try looking at the gear cover on the extreme end. There is
usually a plate with the model description for the bed length,
spindle type and other details. The serial no is on the RHS bed end
between the V and the flat. I had to scrape off 66 years of bedway
oil deposit to see mine.

My lathe was described to me as an S. Found no model-S exists, but
did find it to be a 10", 3-foot large spindle bore from the numbers
987-Y. Mine serial No. 94772, manuf in early 1940. Marked dww
which could mean Dept of War Work? Anyway mine is in sunny
Cheshire, UK and now has a new motor, flat leather belt and chuck is
on the way to replace the specially ground one. I have also
replaced the original tool post with a modern quick change post
which is an improvement for modern tooling.

Good luck.

--- In southbendlathe@..., "bonalybob" <bj@...> wrote:

--- In southbendlathe@..., "helenalred" <helenalred@>
wrote:

Hi

I have just bought a house and in the cellar we found a South
Bend
S.
Hi Helen

I am a Southbend owner already and I am trying to find another one
for a friend in the south of England, UK. Do you want to sell this
lathe? Is it sold already?

Best wishes Bonalybob


Re: 10" Toolroom Lathe

Tim Boan <boan@...>
 

The shipping weight is about 1100 lbs. Trying to "muscle" it is a recipe for
disaster.

Attaching the 2x6s to the feet is a great plan. This is what I did (and will
do again) when I had to move my heavy 10, but I bolted steel casters to
the 2x6s. This made it much easier for one person to move.

When mine came home, two of us loaded it from ground level, with the
casters attached, using an engine hoist, into the back of my pickup. I
single handedly unloaded it using the bucket on my tractor onto a ramp in
my basement's outside stairwell. Rolling it down the ramp into the
basement was a challenge due to the top heaviness or the lathe. I had to
add about 200 lbs. to the tailstock legs to prevent rotation around the
headstock at the bottom of the ramp.

Good luck and be safe.
Tim


To: southbendlathe@...
From: "pupdieselluv" <hmshop@...>
Date sent: Wed, 17 Jan 2007 12:44:28 -0000
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: 10" Toolroom Lathe
Send reply to: southbendlathe@...

TRhe 10 Heavy is 1100 pounds. No four guys can't muscle it around.
Attach 2x6s to the feet (or 4x4) and use steel pipes to roll the
machine from point A to point B.
Go slow, use mechanical advantage.
If you are near Northern VA I'll come over and move it for you.
Eric


--- In southbendlathe@..., "amvskd" <amvskd@...> wrote:

Hello,
Am new here and have a few questions about a 10" south Bend tool
room lathe I am going to look at and possibly purchase. I have not
worked with anything bigger than one of the 7X12 imports since high
school shop class. So my question is, what is it going to take to
move this size lathe or more so what is the est weight of a heavy
10??
There is a forklift to load it but can 4 guys muscle it off s
pickup
truck??
--
boan@...


Re: 10" Toolroom Lathe

Jim B. <eeengineer@...>
 

I brought one home in October.
I rented a 5 by 6 ramp trailer from U-Hall. ($70)
George Daab, the machinery dealer had bolted it to a pair of 2X4's and had it on a pair of automotive dollies.
These he had gotten from HF. They have 4 casters each and a well for the wheels to fit into.
George with the help of my daughter on one of his friends, pushed the lathe out of the garage to the trailer ramp. (I took pictures) He put a piece of plywood on the ramp since its a metal mesh and the dollies get stuck. We wenched the lathe onto the bed of the trailer with a come-along. Three people steadied the lathe on the way up/.
Secured it with a pair of 3" tydowns to the side of the trailer.
It was in Long Island NY. I am in New Jersey, about 75 Miles, over both the Throgs Neck Bridge and the George Washington Bridge. (On an Sunday Morning thank you). Towed it with a 2000 F-150.
Once home, With the help of my daughter and a friend (her's, mine are too old) we just rolled it off the trailer, (George let me borrow the dollies) and into the basement (Opening at ground level) and into the shop. The off time was less than 10 minuets.
 
 

Jim B.

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex.... It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction"

Albert Einstein.

 


From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of amvskd
Sent: Tuesday, January 16, 2007 9:18 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] 10" Toolroom Lathe

Hello,
Am new here and have a few questions about a 10" south Bend tool
room lathe I am going to look at and possibly purchase. I have not
worked with anything bigger than one of the 7X12 imports since high
school shop class. So my question is, what is it going to take to
move this size lathe or more so what is the est weight of a heavy 10??
There is a forklift to load it but can 4 guys muscle it off s pickup
truck??


Re: Lathe in my Cellar

bonalybob <bj@...>
 

--- In southbendlathe@..., "helenalred" <helenalred@...>
wrote:

Hi

I have just bought a house and in the cellar we found a South Bend
S.
Hi Helen

I am a Southbend owner already and I am trying to find another one
for a friend in the south of England, UK. Do you want to sell this
lathe? Is it sold already?

Best wishes Bonalybob


sharpening fly cutter bits

drinkr55
 

Iam adding a 3mt flycutter to my lathe tools and was wondering if
anyone has the geometry for a cutting bit hss for flat milling in my
milling vise?


Re: 10" Toolroom Lathe

Clive Foster
 

Arnie S I'm not but a friend and I bought my Heavy 10 home and installed
it using engine hoist supplemented muscle power. Mine is mid 1950's build
on a full cabinet base. Hoist was a fold up type so it could be taken to the job.

Our procedure was to remove a few easy off things such as tailstock and
top-slide. Split the belt and unbolt the lathe from the bench so it could
be easily lifted by the engine hoist and swung into the van.
Base went out to van on rollers, was swung on end vertical, van backed up
so that base could be "tilt and hoiked" in with the aid of the hoist.

Reversed procedure at other end to remove.
Due to access problems we couldn't use the hoist to put the lathe back on
the bench so but I was able to put it on another bench of slightly greater
height close by so we were able to swivel and slide the main lathe real
close and just carry across the gangway sorta one end at a time.
Would've been safer to use a plank, loading ramp or whatever to
slide all the way but, as both friend and I can lift over a hundredweight
from ground level solo, we had no problems simply holding it at height
and lowering.

If you haven't got the gear a coupla three skateboards or roller skates
can be very handy under things. If you go the de-mount route its a
lot easier if you have strong tables, trestles or whatever so you don't
have to put it right at ground level.
Oh and don't lift by the changewheel cover!
Best way to lift is with proper eye(s) and block(s) clamped to the bed.
Easy to make if you can get access beforehand.

HTH.

Clive

"Dennis Turk" <dennis.turk2@...> wrote:


Yes you could but they better be four Arnold S. clones or his
equivalent. That is when he was in his prime. Really you need an
overhead hoist or engine hoist even a car tow truck with a boom.
Don't try and take it off the truck by hand or it will be broken.
Maybe you to.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "amvskd" <amvskd@> wrote:

Hello,
Am new here and have a few questions about a 10" south Bend tool
room lathe I am going to look at and possibly purchase. I have not
worked with anything bigger than one of the 7X12 imports since high
school shop class. So my question is, what is it going to take to
move this size lathe or more so what is the est weight of a heavy
10??
There is a forklift to load it but can 4 guys muscle it off s pickup
truck??


Re: 10" Toolroom Lathe

hoffmeyer <hmshop@hotmail.com>
 

TRhe 10 Heavy is 1100 pounds. No four guys can't muscle it around.
Attach 2x6s to the feet (or 4x4) and use steel pipes to roll the
machine from point A to point B.
Go slow, use mechanical advantage.
If you are near Northern VA I'll come over and move it for you.
Eric


--- In southbendlathe@..., "amvskd" <amvskd@...> wrote:

Hello,
Am new here and have a few questions about a 10" south Bend tool
room lathe I am going to look at and possibly purchase. I have not
worked with anything bigger than one of the 7X12 imports since high
school shop class. So my question is, what is it going to take to
move this size lathe or more so what is the est weight of a heavy
10??
There is a forklift to load it but can 4 guys muscle it off s
pickup
truck??


Re: 10" Toolroom Lathe

Mike Miller <mike@...>
 

In Denver, it's about $300 to move any piece of big machinetool from point A to point B. The Guy's got a purpose designed lift to do so, the lathe never gets more than 2 or 3 inches in the air, and everything is REALLY stable.

You know that old adage about the right tool for the job? That was the right tool. The guy picked it up, trucked it over, and put it _exactly_ where I wanted it. 



On Jan 16, 2007, at 9:43 PM, spradlins wrote:

Heavy ten s weigh just under 1000 pounds.   You all would have to lift about 250 lbs each and it is very top heavy so no you probally are not going to do that.   A good beam or two in a heavy buillding but best to haul it on a low flat bed trailer with a ramp for atvs and slide it off when home.  Remember they are very top heavy , you cant do to much to make sure they are not going to flop over.   Other than that they are wonderful machines,   Just be sure to be careful they cant get away from you and flip over,   Good to have the four friends to make sure sliding it off the trailer it dont tip .  
Good Luck
Grumpy 
 
 
 
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: amvskd
Sent: Tuesday, January 16, 2007 7:17 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] 10" Toolroom Lathe

Hello,
Am new here and have a few questions about a 10" south Bend tool
room lathe I am going to look at and possibly purchase. I have not
worked with anything bigger than one of the 7X12 imports since high
school shop class. So my question is, what is it going to take to
move this size lathe or more so what is the est weight of a heavy 10??
There is a forklift to load it but can 4 guys muscle it off s pickup
truck??



SBL 14.5 Taper Attachement Tie Rod...

Keyth Lombard
 

Does anyone have a Taper Attachement Tie Rod (Part #23, PT865F1, on
Form 922D)for a 14.5" SBL available? Barring that could someone with
one provide dimentions from their's?

Thanks,

Keyth


Re: SB 13" head stock bearings

russellmshigeoka
 

--- In southbendlathe@..., "fixerjo" <fixerjo@...> wrote:

Hello all, I'm in need of some guidence on adjusting bearings
on
my SB 13 " lathe ( cat. CL8145B). <snip> In order to get tight
enough to eliminate all chatter the bearing starts to heat up and
bind at higher spindle speeds. Even w/ the bearing set up fairly
tight, occasionally on starting up I get what sounds like chatter
<snip>
Also, how are these bearings oiled, the cups appear to be well
below the bearings? and what are the plugs above and below the cups
for ?
You need to measure the radial play in the spindle to get a baseline
to know where your at. Use the bar stock method to measure this. I
have seen two sets of specs for this measurement. In the South Bend
FORM no. 2002 pamphlet it says a reading of .0007" - .001" is
required. However, the rec.metalworking site has a post quoting the
booklet "Keep Your Lathe in Trim" from South Bend Lathe Works as
saying,

"The dial indicator should show a movement of .001" to .002" if the
bearings are in good condition and properly adjusted. Less than .001"
movement will indicate very little clearance for oil film, which may
cause the lathe to chatter, or may cause the bearings to heat and
become scored. If more than .002" spindle movement is indicated, it
may be necessary to take up the bearing"

More importantly the post goes on to say,

"Chatter is no indication that the spindle bearings are loose. In
fact, chatter is sometimes caused by the bearings being too tight"

the link to the post is here: http://tinyurl.com/2gxp8t

I have a 13" SB I too opened mines up to double check the condition
of the wicks. However, when I reassembled the caps, I couldn't get
it to run the way it was running, which was perfect.

When I first removed the caps I noticed the front cap bolts were
barely snug and the rear cap bolts were cinched down hard. So when I
reassembled them I cinched both caps down decently hard. Well the
spindle wouldn't even turn. I took off the front cap and the spindle
turned fine. So the rear cap was good, I then snugged down the front
caps until the play at both ends measured rear=.001", front=.001".
However it still felt a little tight but the spindle did spin but
with little effort, but not as freely as it originally did. I ran
the lathe for about 5 minutes, the front bearing started to gradually
warm up, then all of a sudden it got hot much faster (the spindle
too) so I quickly turned off the machine.

Then I got a little depressed, because I thought I had my spindle at
the upper limit of acceptable play, but it ran like crap. I figured
I screwed with it and ruined it. But then I said screw it I'll just
put it back to the way it felt. I was uncomfortable with leaving the
front caps barely snug, so I cut out to soda can shims (.004"), one
for each side of the front cap. Torqued the front bolts down pretty
hard, and got a reading of .002" play for the front. Now the spindle
turned very freely, but still not as free as in its "perfect" state.
There was a very slight difference in feel but not much. I ran the
lathe again for much longer and the bearings did not even get very
warm. I took cuts on stock and all was good again.

I did not take an initial reading in its "perfect" state, so I don't
know where I started from. The difference in feel in the spindle was
that with the belt disengaged and a 5" chuck on the spindle it took
no effort to spin the spindle. With the .002" play in front it takes
just a hair more effort to spin the chuck. At .001" play it took
effort, but still spun. Below .001 it stuck. I was contemplating
adding a hair more shim stock, so I could get the spindle to turn
effortlessly, but decided not too.

The headstock adjustments is a very fine adjustment, but I just
figure I'll go with common sense instead of strict adherence to the
numbers:

warm bearings = bad
cool bearings, good cuts = good
cool bearings, sloppy cuts = bad

Also, I figure the bigger the spindle, the higher range of spindle
play allowed. Tolerance for a 9" would be less than for a 13" etc.
so you couldn't apply one overall set of numbers.

For your last question, the plugs above and below the oiler and the
oiler all go to the same place ... a reservoir under the headstock.
The oil in the reservoir is wicked up via a cigarette shaped felt to
the bottom of the spindle. The bottom plug is used to drain the
reservoir (every 3 months, based on a 8 hour usage per day), the top
plug allows you to put a wire (paper clip) in there to stab the wick
and hold it in place to insert the spindle by sliding it in the
bearings. The oil cup is a fill level measure as well as the way to
get oil in the reservoir.

Aloha, Russell


Re: Questions about a 13x60 South bend Lathe with a catalog number 86B...

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi P

I find your catalog number 86B in my 1926 catalog. the lathe is a 5
foot bed model with quick change gear box and is setup for overhead
line shaft drive.

Turk--- In southbendlathe@..., "pmudbone" <pmudbone@...>
wrote:

I picked this up and have been putting things together bit by bit.
Can anyone tell me any history of this catalog number? I looked
through the posted messages, FAQ, and other info on the site and
can't
seem to find any references. I'm just curious about the age of the
unit and etc...
Thanks
P


Re: 10" Toolroom Lathe

spradlins
 

Heavy ten s weigh just under 1000 pounds.   You all would have to lift about 250 lbs each and it is very top heavy so no you probally are not going to do that.   A good beam or two in a heavy buillding but best to haul it on a low flat bed trailer with a ramp for atvs and slide it off when home.  Remember they are very top heavy , you cant do to much to make sure they are not going to flop over.   Other than that they are wonderful machines,   Just be sure to be careful they cant get away from you and flip over,   Good to have the four friends to make sure sliding it off the trailer it dont tip .  
Good Luck
Grumpy 
 
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: amvskd
Sent: Tuesday, January 16, 2007 7:17 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] 10" Toolroom Lathe

Hello,
Am new here and have a few questions about a 10" south Bend tool
room lathe I am going to look at and possibly purchase. I have not
worked with anything bigger than one of the 7X12 imports since high
school shop class. So my question is, what is it going to take to
move this size lathe or more so what is the est weight of a heavy 10??
There is a forklift to load it but can 4 guys muscle it off s pickup
truck??


Re: South Bend Heavy 10 pinion gear

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Peter

I have three extra heavy ten aprons for parts. One thing to
remember is the main drive gear that is attached to the pinion shaft
is drilled on assembly and is taper pinned. You can not interchange
gears and pinion shafts with out drilling a new taper pin hole.
Have fun with the oil wicks in there also.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "peter_gagne"
<peter_gagne@...> wrote:

Hi, I am trying to rebuild the apron on my heavy 10" SB lathe, and
need the pinion gear that engages the rack. The gear has 14 teeth,
is
1.145"OD x .75" on a shaft that is .750" diameter by 4" overall.
I
believe that the gear is 14 Pitch and I cannot find one like it in
the
Browning Power Transmission Catalog. I could use either the gear
alone
or the integral gear/shaft. Does anyone know of a source for this
part? Thanks in advance for any help! Peter.


Re: 10" Toolroom Lathe

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Yes you could but they better be four Arnold S. clones or his
equivalent. That is when he was in his prime. Really you need an
overhead hoist or engine hoist even a car tow truck with a boom.
Don't try and take it off the truck by hand or it will be broken.
Maybe you to.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "amvskd" <amvskd@...> wrote:

Hello,
Am new here and have a few questions about a 10" south Bend tool
room lathe I am going to look at and possibly purchase. I have not
worked with anything bigger than one of the 7X12 imports since high
school shop class. So my question is, what is it going to take to
move this size lathe or more so what is the est weight of a heavy
10??
There is a forklift to load it but can 4 guys muscle it off s pickup
truck??


Re: SB 13" head stock bearings

tetramachine
 

You have likely found inside the belt cover the instructions for
adjusting the bearings, but not understood how this system works.
The two bearings are each a bronze sleeve, the ends are not joined
in the center as usual sleeve bearings are but left with a gap. This
gap about.250 is filled with the bearing expander, nothing more that
a bronze bar, with an angled groove each side that captures the ends
of the sleeve bearing. This expander is attached to the upper
bearing caps with two small screws, accessed by removing the two
socket head plugs on top the bearing caps. This is problem # ONE it
is common for someone during the life of you lathe to remove the
bearing caps, without first removing those two small screws. When
this is done the bearing adjuster no longer functions when the cap
is replaced, it just sits on top of the bearing doing nada. If this
has happened to your lathe you need to get the expander back between
the bearing ends. Two ways to do this, Best way, remove the spindle
press off the backgear pinion, cone pulleys, bull gear, slide the
expander into the bushing and reassemble, likely way lift the
spindle, with broad blade snap ring expanders open up the gap of the
bushing and drop the expander in. (replace felt wipers first) You
now have the expanders where they belong. install bearing caps,
tighten bolts, install expander screws and snug them, much more and
they'll break. With a dial indicator contacting the spindle just
ahead of the chuck bearing cap, first push down with a 6 inch piece
of stock in the jaws, zero dial, then lift up, no less than .0005
nor more than .0015. the small end is adjusted same way. If you need
to add or remove shims do it in .0005 increments, you should keep
the shim stacks of each cap about equal(meaning front and rear of
the same cap)
Hope this helps






southbendlathe@..., "fixerjo" <fixerjo@...> wrote:

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Ron Clobes" <rclobes@>
wrote:


Also, how are these bearings oiled, the cups appear to be
well
below the bearings? and what are the plugs above and below the
cups
for ?

Appreciate and help
Joe Brincat , Farmington Hills, MI

I don't know about the adjustments. I have a 1942 vintage 13"
lathe
that doesn't have the two expander screws at the top of each
bearing
cap. Just the two big bolts to hold down the bearing caps.
You'll
want to pick up a CE3458 Parts manual to get the full scoop on
how
to
adjust the spindle bearings. Sounds like you have the standard
headstock bearings so I am sure someone else will have more info
even
if it is not from a 13" owner. I have a stack of shims in mine
yet
but when I run out, I imagine I will have to dig out my Jan/Feb
2007
Home Shop Machinist magazine and line bore my headstock.
Probably
won't happen in my lifetime as work and house projects
effectively
keep me away from the lathe.

I do understand how the lubing is done. The cups lead to two
chambers in the headstock. The oil is wicked up to the
bearings,
and
returns to the chambers below through little return holes in the
bottom of the grooves on either side of the bearing so that the
oil
doesn't drip all over the floor. Seems like an effective way to
assure that you have clean oil lubing the spindle at all times.
Well, maybe it doesn't work very well in an unheated garage at 7
deg
F. ;oP

It would seem to me that the oil cups have a dual purpose as a
sight
level and a means to fill the oil resevoirs. If you are going
to
clean the little oil return holes, be careful. Mine had a
little
brass or bronze spring at the top end of the return holes next
to
the
spindle . Not sure what those are for. (strainers?!?) The
little
springs do have hooks obviously meant to keep them from being
carried
down the return holes. Just be looking for them before you go
ramming a pipe cleaner down the return hole. Might want to
clean
the
whole headstock out with kerosene (or your solvent of choice)
first.

Sincerely:

Ron Clobes
Ron, thanks much for the info. It sure helps to get a few words of
advice before one begins "screwing" things up. I would have had no
idea about the drain hole springs. And you are right, I would have
run a pipe cleaner of stick down the hole.
Hopefully someone will come on with words of wisdom about
adjusting the bearings that have the lock key. I checked my copy
of "
How to ..." and it just talks about the two piece bronze bearings
that don't have the lock key. But id does say that proper
clearance
is .001" no more - no less.
PS. my lathe is a 1951 model
Joe B


Re: Weight of Lathe

n8dtp
 

--- In southbendlathe@..., "n8dtp" <n8dtpyahoo@...> wrote:

--- In southbendlathe@..., "rda1267" <rda1267@> wrote:

I haven't seen this anywhere in FAQ or on the posts since 1/5/07.

Does anyone have an estimation of the weight of a 1946 16" with 10
ft bed. I am about to become the owner of one and am looking to see
if my tractor can pick it up. (about 3000 # limit)

An information is appreciated.
Thanks
David
David weight is approx 2800# pounds according to the southbend book.
They also made this lathe in a 14 inch. Hope this helps.
JIM
Correction 14 Feet.


Re: Weight of Lathe

n8dtp
 

--- In southbendlathe@..., "rda1267" <rda1267@...> wrote:

I haven't seen this anywhere in FAQ or on the posts since 1/5/07.

Does anyone have an estimation of the weight of a 1946 16" with 10
ft bed. I am about to become the owner of one and am looking to see
if my tractor can pick it up. (about 3000 # limit)

An information is appreciated.
Thanks
David
David weight is approx 2800# pounds according to the southbend book.
They also made this lathe in a 14 inch. Hope this helps.
JIM


10" Toolroom Lathe

amvskd
 

Hello,
Am new here and have a few questions about a 10" south Bend tool
room lathe I am going to look at and possibly purchase. I have not
worked with anything bigger than one of the 7X12 imports since high
school shop class. So my question is, what is it going to take to
move this size lathe or more so what is the est weight of a heavy 10??
There is a forklift to load it but can 4 guys muscle it off s pickup
truck??


Re: Weight of Lathe

tetramachine
 

-I have a 6 foot and it lists a 2350 + 150 for the T/A I'd add 400 +
fot the extra lenght.

-- In southbendlathe@..., "Wally Blackburn"
<wallyblackburn@...> wrote:

Wow...a 10 foot bed?! I don't know, you might be pushin' it there.
I would figure 2000 pounds for even the shortest bed 16", but my
experience has been mostly with the more modern gear-head models.

Wally

69361 - 69380 of 106848