Date   

Re: SB 9" Model A, B, and C Cross Feed Screws - Some Questions

Steve Wells
 

If they followed the same trends as the older wide beds, (Denny can
correct me, if I'm wrong..haha) the gear blank on the shaft is there,
it just has been turned down soas you can't cut the gear.

Steve


--- In southbendlathe@..., "Wally Blackburn"
<wallyblackburn@...> wrote:

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Steve Wells" <wswells@>
wrote:
OK, that's why I asked - I've always had trouble remembering the
different models.

Sooo, the A and B should have identical cross feed screws (with the
gear), and the model C should be unique (no gear) - right?

Thanks,
Wally

Wally
The B has power cross feed, it just used standard change change
gears
for threading, did not have a QC gear box.

Steve Wells






--- In southbendlathe@..., "Wally Blackburn"
<wallyblackburn@> wrote:

Double-checking on an assumption I am making. I would guess
that
the
Models B and C cross feed screws are identical (no cross feed
gear).
And, obviously, the A has the integral gear for cross feed.

Correct?

Thanks,
Wally


Re: Some items for sale

dibgib39
 

Please give me your phone # and I'll call you.  I'm interested in the lubricants-oil cans, and bar stock.  Thanks,  Paul C. in CT

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...]On Behalf Of cocuscannon
Sent: Tuesday, January 16, 2007 4:17 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Some items for sale

Hi folks,

I've got some lathe related accessories for sale that I thought I'd
offer up here before putting on ebay.

Albrecht Drill chuck with an MT#2/jacobs #2 taper arbor, in
excellent condition. 13mm Capacity. I believe this is the Albrecht
drill chuck that sells for $400 in the MSC catalog, without the
arbor. I'm asking $250., which includes shipping and insurance. It
appears to barely have been used.

Drill chuck with MT#2 Taper arbor, like new condition. I believe the
brand is CF, but a google search doesn't get me any result, so I'm
not sure. The logo looks like "C.F" with an oval around the
letters. It's a JT6 - max capacity of 13mm. Not sure on the price
yet, shoot me an email and we can talk.

If you're local to the Boston area, I've got the following items
that are also available for local pick-up:

I have about 35 pieces of bar stock tool steel, and bunch of rod
stock tool steel as well. I'm willing to sell by the piece or as a
lot.

Machine oil, way oil, spindle oil, and oiling cans: I've got one
gallon of each, type of oil, brand new, plus two brand new oiler
cans. Selling as a lot. I will also include a couple of partially
full bottles of dykem and partial bottle of cutting fluid. All for
$50.

South Bend Lathe stand/cabinet: I've got a very nice South Bend
Lathe stand with two cabinets that is left from the sale of my 9A.
This is a horizontal drive stand, and includes the rear bracket for
mounting the motor/rear pulley assembly, all in excellent
condition. It held my 3.5ft bed 9A with room to spare, so I believe
longer bed lathes up to 4.5 would also fit. $300.

Small but decent benchtop drill press, in excellent condition,not
one of the complete junk chinese machines $75 1/3HP and I think
it's an 8"

If you have interest in any of these items, feel free to contact me
via email for photos or additional info.

Thanks,

Loren B.
Boston, MA.


Some items for sale

cocuscannon
 

Hi folks,

I've got some lathe related accessories for sale that I thought I'd
offer up here before putting on ebay.

Albrecht Drill chuck with an MT#2/jacobs #2 taper arbor, in
excellent condition. 13mm Capacity. I believe this is the Albrecht
drill chuck that sells for $400 in the MSC catalog, without the
arbor. I'm asking $250., which includes shipping and insurance. It
appears to barely have been used.

Drill chuck with MT#2 Taper arbor, like new condition. I believe the
brand is CF, but a google search doesn't get me any result, so I'm
not sure. The logo looks like "C.F" with an oval around the
letters. It's a JT6 - max capacity of 13mm. Not sure on the price
yet, shoot me an email and we can talk.

If you're local to the Boston area, I've got the following items
that are also available for local pick-up:

I have about 35 pieces of bar stock tool steel, and bunch of rod
stock tool steel as well. I'm willing to sell by the piece or as a
lot.

Machine oil, way oil, spindle oil, and oiling cans: I've got one
gallon of each, type of oil, brand new, plus two brand new oiler
cans. Selling as a lot. I will also include a couple of partially
full bottles of dykem and partial bottle of cutting fluid. All for
$50.

South Bend Lathe stand/cabinet: I've got a very nice South Bend
Lathe stand with two cabinets that is left from the sale of my 9A.
This is a horizontal drive stand, and includes the rear bracket for
mounting the motor/rear pulley assembly, all in excellent
condition. It held my 3.5ft bed 9A with room to spare, so I believe
longer bed lathes up to 4.5 would also fit. $300.

Small but decent benchtop drill press, in excellent condition,not
one of the complete junk chinese machines $75 1/3HP and I think
it's an 8"


If you have interest in any of these items, feel free to contact me
via email for photos or additional info.

Thanks,

Loren B.
Boston, MA.


Re: SB 9" Model A, B, and C Cross Feed Screws - Some Questions

Wally Blackburn
 

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Steve Wells" <wswells@...> wrote:
OK, that's why I asked - I've always had trouble remembering the
different models.

Sooo, the A and B should have identical cross feed screws (with the
gear), and the model C should be unique (no gear) - right?

Thanks,
Wally

Wally
The B has power cross feed, it just used standard change change gears
for threading, did not have a QC gear box.

Steve Wells






--- In southbendlathe@..., "Wally Blackburn"
<wallyblackburn@> wrote:

Double-checking on an assumption I am making. I would guess that
the
Models B and C cross feed screws are identical (no cross feed
gear).
And, obviously, the A has the integral gear for cross feed.

Correct?

Thanks,
Wally


Questions about a 13x60 Southbend Lathe with a catalog number 86B...

pmudbone <pmudbone@...>
 

I picked this up and have been putting things together bit by bit.
Can anyone tell me any history of this catalog number? I looked
through the posted messages, FAQ, and other info on the site and can't
seem to find any references. I'm just curious about the age of the
unit and etc...
Thanks
P


Re: SB 9" Model A, B, and C Cross Feed Screws - Some Questions

Steve Wells
 

Wally
The B has power cross feed, it just used standard change change gears
for threading, did not have a QC gear box.

Steve Wells






--- In southbendlathe@..., "Wally Blackburn"
<wallyblackburn@...> wrote:

Double-checking on an assumption I am making. I would guess that
the
Models B and C cross feed screws are identical (no cross feed
gear).
And, obviously, the A has the integral gear for cross feed.

Correct?

Thanks,
Wally


Re: Weight of Lathe

Wally Blackburn
 

Wow...a 10 foot bed?! I don't know, you might be pushin' it there.
I would figure 2000 pounds for even the shortest bed 16", but my
experience has been mostly with the more modern gear-head models.

Wally


SB 9" Model A, B, and C Cross Feed Screws - Some Questions

Wally Blackburn
 

Double-checking on an assumption I am making. I would guess that the
Models B and C cross feed screws are identical (no cross feed gear).
And, obviously, the A has the integral gear for cross feed.

Correct?

Thanks,
Wally


South Bend Heavy 10 pinion gear

peter_gagne <peter_gagne@...>
 

Hi, I am trying to rebuild the apron on my heavy 10" SB lathe, and
need the pinion gear that engages the rack. The gear has 14 teeth, is
1.145"OD x .75" on a shaft that is .750" diameter by 4" overall. I
believe that the gear is 14 Pitch and I cannot find one like it in the
Browning Power Transmission Catalog. I could use either the gear alone
or the integral gear/shaft. Does anyone know of a source for this
part? Thanks in advance for any help! Peter.


Re: 1910 SB update

John Dammeyer
 

Hi Turk,

Very nice!!! I wonder if you could post a couple of measurements for me
please? I'd like to know how wide the carriage is and the width of the
ways. I've been building up some statistics and I'm curious what the ratio
of spindle height to carriage width to the width of the ways).

From the picture it looks like the ways are about 7.5" and the width of the
carriage is about 8". Maybe even wider.

Thanks

John Dammeyer




Automation Artisans Inc.
http://www.autoartisans.com
Ph. 1 250 544 4950

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@...
[mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of Dennis Turk
Sent: Monday, January 15, 2007 9:33 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] 1910 SB update


Hi All

Well I have put the first pictures of were the 1910 SB is as of
tonight. I have competed all the scraping and most of the paint work
and have started fitting and assembly. Take a look at the
pictures of
what has to be one of the smallest lathe the Twins built. I
understand this was the first design they competed and offered to the
public in 1906. If you look at the bed under the head stock you will
see it is cut away for belt clearance so this lathe could be
used with
the foot peddle setup similar to the 12 inch lathe. We need Ray
Ferguson to put up some photos of his 1910 serial number 727 up for
all to see. His has to be one of the most original and compete early
SB's around especially unique as its a peddle lathe.

Here is my Flicker link to the pictures.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/45888076@N00/?saved=1

Turk



--
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More pix: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SouthBendLathePix/
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FAQ:
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1910 SB update

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi All

Well I have put the first pictures of were the 1910 SB is as of
tonight. I have competed all the scraping and most of the paint work
and have started fitting and assembly. Take a look at the pictures of
what has to be one of the smallest lathe the Twins built. I
understand this was the first design they competed and offered to the
public in 1906. If you look at the bed under the head stock you will
see it is cut away for belt clearance so this lathe could be used with
the foot peddle setup similar to the 12 inch lathe. We need Ray
Ferguson to put up some photos of his 1910 serial number 727 up for
all to see. His has to be one of the most original and compete early
SB's around especially unique as its a peddle lathe.

Here is my Flicker link to the pictures.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/45888076@N00/?saved=1

Turk


Re: New member & new South Bend 9" Lathe owner

Jim B. <eeengineer@...>
 

Do I mount the tools in the tool post directly, maybe with some shim
stock to put the cutting edge at exactly dead center, or do I still
need to use tool holders?

You do not need a separate tool holder. You will need shims to bring the tool on center.
Chuck some round stock. Bring the tool into the stock with a 6" scale between the tool and the stock.
Keep shimming until the the scale is vertical.
You can tilt the tool with shims in the front and none in the back.
One of the advantages of the QC tool post I mentioned is the ease of adjustment.
 
If I don't need tool holders, what size of tools do I need to use?
Measuring the tool post it looks like I could use up to 1/2" bits
before it would place the cutting edge above center.


Since you most likely will need some adjustment go with 3/8 tools.
 
Should the pin come out completely? I was able to pull it out about
3/4", but now it just turns and I can't get it to budge either
direction, and the cone still appears to be locked to the bull gear.
 
No the pin should not come out. With the back gears NOT engaged,  and the belt relaxed, if the pin is all the way out the cones should rotate by hand.
Also there is a small screw  in the middle step of the cones. It should say OIL. Be sure this is oiled or the cone will freeze to the spindle.
Use spindle oil here, although more recent data from SB indicates that Teflon grease is ok. I prefer spindle oil.
 
I did not get any change gears, and looking through eBay the set can
be quite expensive. These are only used for threading, right?
Yes they are used for threading. If you can get a complete set it would be less expensive than buying them gear by gear.
 
You should have a large turning gear. Somewhere around 107 tooth on the lead screw.
There should be a small gear on the post on the forward/reverse rocker lever. (16 to 24 tooth)
Then you should have an 80 tooth Idler gear to make up the difference. There are also compound gears which can go between the small gear and the turning gear.  to slow down the feed rate.
There is a 2:1 and a 5:1 or 7:1 ( I am not sure which, my 9" is a bit different than yours.
The compound gears will take the place of the 80 tooth idler.


Jim B.

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex.... It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction"

Albert Einstein.

 


From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of Michael Oberg
Sent: Monday, January 15, 2007 7:42 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] New member & new South Bend 9" Lathe owner

Jim, Thank you for the reply & the good info.


On 1/15/07, Jim B. <eeengineer@comcast.net> wrote:
> (1) What type of tool post do I have? It appears to be some sort of
> quick-change turret, but I do not have any additional parts. Is this
> designed to take the tool holders, or hold the individual bits
> directly?
>
> This is a standard 4-way or 4 position tool post. It is able to take 4 different tools and rotates to
> bring the tool of choice into position. It is also able to be set at 45 degrees which is useful at times.

Do I mount the tools in the tool post directly, maybe with some shim
stock to put the cutting edge at exactly dead center, or do I still
need to use tool holders?

If I don't need tool holders, what size of tools do I need to use?
Measuring the tool post it looks like I could use up to 1/2" bits
before it would place the cutting edge above center.

> (2) When I engage the back gears I cannot turn the chuck (i.e. I
> currently only have 3 speeds), is there anything additional I need to
> do to use this, or is there something actually wrong/needs oiling?
>
> On the front of the Bull gear, the large gear under the front cover you will find a pin/plunger with a knurled head.
> Pull the pin out. You should feel a detent. This pin locks the cone (the stepped pulleys which the belt run on) to the bull gear which is keyed to the spindle.
> Without pulling the pin the front and rear gears on the spindle are locked together and the back gears cannot turn.
>

Should the pin come out completely? I was able to pull it out about
3/4", but now it just turns and I can't get it to budge either
direction, and the cone still appears to be locked to the bull gear.

> (3) What accessories are "must haves"? Tool holders (maybe with a
> different turret?), 4-jaw chuck? steady rests? The primary purpose is
> automotive applications (I am restoring an old BMW motorcycle &
> sidecar, and plan on restoring an old Porsche next), but I am
> interested in general metalworking as well.
>
> The 4 way toolpost is quite vestal. You may want to look at at Quick Change Tool post.
> One member of the group, Jeff Beck (tools4cheep.com) has a good price on these.
> This is a Model C lathe, did you get change gears with it.
> Collets are useful for holding things very concentric.

I did not get any change gears, and looking through ebay the set can
be quite expensive. These are only used for threading, right?

Thanks again for the information!

Michael


Re: SB 13" head stock bearings

fred eisner
 

hi guys
i have a simple way to align the centers
take a pc of 1" drill rod (or crs) but drill rod is better and cut two discs about 3/4 thick
place in accurate chuck and face and center drill both pcs accurately
put centers in both head and tailstock
bring them close together and place the discs on each center and close the gap so they touch lightly
mic them across the vertical and horz planes
if it reads 1.000 then you are dead on
if it reads 1.010 then the tailstock has to be moved .005"
simple and accurate
fred

From: "Dennis Turk" <dennis.turk2@...>
Reply-To: southbendlathe@...
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: SB 13" head stock bearings
Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2007 02:31:07 -0000

Tail stock alignment

This works well with a six inch scale between your tool bit and the
work piece in your lathe to get the bit on center. AS to using this
for checking the alignment of the tail stock to the head stock.
Well if the points on the dead centers were perfect it would get you
close but I don't thing the points will be good enough to get you
any closer than the ball park. If the points on the centers are
good enough it will get you within the rang of a .015 test
indicator. Maybe.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "M. Walter" <m.walter1@...>
wrote:

About 60 years ago, probably in Popular Mechanics, I read an
article that said to put a center in the tail stock and one in the
head stock. Then bring the two points together with something like
a hacksaw blade between them. If the blade remains vertical (or
horizontal), the two points are aligned. If not, adjust the tail
stock until they are. If the tail stock spindle isn't parallel to
the bed though, you will get a different valuation each time you
extend or retract the quill. That would give one a clue that
there's work to do.
----- Original Message -----
From: fixerjo
To: southbendlathe@...
Sent: Monday, January 15, 2007 1:15 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: SB 13" head stock bearings


--- In southbendlathe@..., "Ron Clobes" <rclobes@>
wrote:
>
>
> > Also, how are these bearings oiled, the cups appear to be
well
> > below the bearings? and what are the plugs above and below
the
cups
> > for ?
> >
> > Appreciate and help
> > Joe Brincat , Farmington Hills, MI
>
>
> I don't know about the adjustments. I have a 1942 vintage 13"
lathe
> that doesn't have the two expander screws at the top of each
bearing
> cap. Just the two big bolts to hold down the bearing caps.
You'll
> want to pick up a CE3458 Parts manual to get the full scoop on
how
to
> adjust the spindle bearings. Sounds like you have the standard
> headstock bearings so I am sure someone else will have more
info
even
> if it is not from a 13" owner. I have a stack of shims in mine
yet
> but when I run out, I imagine I will have to dig out my
Jan/Feb
2007
> Home Shop Machinist magazine and line bore my headstock.
Probably
> won't happen in my lifetime as work and house projects
effectively
> keep me away from the lathe.
>
> I do understand how the lubing is done. The cups lead to two
> chambers in the headstock. The oil is wicked up to the
bearings,
and
> returns to the chambers below through little return holes in
the
> bottom of the grooves on either side of the bearing so that
the oil
> doesn't drip all over the floor. Seems like an effective way
to
> assure that you have clean oil lubing the spindle at all
times.
> Well, maybe it doesn't work very well in an unheated garage at
7
deg
> F. ;oP
>
> It would seem to me that the oil cups have a dual purpose as a
sight
> level and a means to fill the oil resevoirs. If you are going
to
> clean the little oil return holes, be careful. Mine had a
little
> brass or bronze spring at the top end of the return holes next
to
the
> spindle . Not sure what those are for. (strainers?!?) The
little
> springs do have hooks obviously meant to keep them from being
carried
> down the return holes. Just be looking for them before you go
> ramming a pipe cleaner down the return hole. Might want to
clean
the
> whole headstock out with kerosene (or your solvent of choice)
first.
>
> Sincerely:
>
> Ron Clobes
>
Ron, thanks much for the info. It sure helps to get a few words
of
advice before one begins "screwing" things up. I would have had
no
idea about the drain hole springs. And you are right, I would
have
run a pipe cleaner of stick down the hole.
Hopefully someone will come on with words of wisdom about
adjusting the bearings that have the lock key. I checked my copy
of "
How to ..." and it just talks about the two piece bronze
bearings
that don't have the lock key. But id does say that proper
clearance
is .001" no more - no less.
PS. my lathe is a 1951 model
Joe B


Re: SB 13" head stock bearings

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Tail stock alignment

This works well with a six inch scale between your tool bit and the
work piece in your lathe to get the bit on center. AS to using this
for checking the alignment of the tail stock to the head stock.
Well if the points on the dead centers were perfect it would get you
close but I don't thing the points will be good enough to get you
any closer than the ball park. If the points on the centers are
good enough it will get you within the rang of a .015 test
indicator. Maybe.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "M. Walter" <m.walter1@...>
wrote:

About 60 years ago, probably in Popular Mechanics, I read an
article that said to put a center in the tail stock and one in the
head stock. Then bring the two points together with something like
a hacksaw blade between them. If the blade remains vertical (or
horizontal), the two points are aligned. If not, adjust the tail
stock until they are. If the tail stock spindle isn't parallel to
the bed though, you will get a different valuation each time you
extend or retract the quill. That would give one a clue that
there's work to do.
----- Original Message -----
From: fixerjo
To: southbendlathe@...
Sent: Monday, January 15, 2007 1:15 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: SB 13" head stock bearings


--- In southbendlathe@..., "Ron Clobes" <rclobes@>
wrote:
>
>
> > Also, how are these bearings oiled, the cups appear to be
well
> > below the bearings? and what are the plugs above and below
the
cups
> > for ?
> >
> > Appreciate and help
> > Joe Brincat , Farmington Hills, MI
>
>
> I don't know about the adjustments. I have a 1942 vintage 13"
lathe
> that doesn't have the two expander screws at the top of each
bearing
> cap. Just the two big bolts to hold down the bearing caps.
You'll
> want to pick up a CE3458 Parts manual to get the full scoop on
how
to
> adjust the spindle bearings. Sounds like you have the standard
> headstock bearings so I am sure someone else will have more
info
even
> if it is not from a 13" owner. I have a stack of shims in mine
yet
> but when I run out, I imagine I will have to dig out my
Jan/Feb
2007
> Home Shop Machinist magazine and line bore my headstock.
Probably
> won't happen in my lifetime as work and house projects
effectively
> keep me away from the lathe.
>
> I do understand how the lubing is done. The cups lead to two
> chambers in the headstock. The oil is wicked up to the
bearings,
and
> returns to the chambers below through little return holes in
the
> bottom of the grooves on either side of the bearing so that
the oil
> doesn't drip all over the floor. Seems like an effective way
to
> assure that you have clean oil lubing the spindle at all
times.
> Well, maybe it doesn't work very well in an unheated garage at
7
deg
> F. ;oP
>
> It would seem to me that the oil cups have a dual purpose as a
sight
> level and a means to fill the oil resevoirs. If you are going
to
> clean the little oil return holes, be careful. Mine had a
little
> brass or bronze spring at the top end of the return holes next
to
the
> spindle . Not sure what those are for. (strainers?!?) The
little
> springs do have hooks obviously meant to keep them from being
carried
> down the return holes. Just be looking for them before you go
> ramming a pipe cleaner down the return hole. Might want to
clean
the
> whole headstock out with kerosene (or your solvent of choice)
first.
>
> Sincerely:
>
> Ron Clobes
>
Ron, thanks much for the info. It sure helps to get a few words
of
advice before one begins "screwing" things up. I would have had
no
idea about the drain hole springs. And you are right, I would
have
run a pipe cleaner of stick down the hole.
Hopefully someone will come on with words of wisdom about
adjusting the bearings that have the lock key. I checked my copy
of "
How to ..." and it just talks about the two piece bronze
bearings
that don't have the lock key. But id does say that proper
clearance
is .001" no more - no less.
PS. my lathe is a 1951 model
Joe B


Leather Spindle Drive Belts

John
 

Hi Members. For those of you who might be interested in replacing
your spindle drive belt with leather may be interested in <
www.LeatherDriveBelts.com > They can be supplied with Clipper clips &
a pin, skived for cementing at installation or made up & shipped
endless.
Regards, John


Re: New member & new South Bend 9" Lathe owner

Michael Oberg
 

Jim, Thank you for the reply & the good info.

On 1/15/07, Jim B. <eeengineer@...> wrote:
(1) What type of tool post do I have? It appears to be some sort of
quick-change turret, but I do not have any additional parts. Is this
designed to take the tool holders, or hold the individual bits
directly?

This is a standard 4-way or 4 position tool post. It is able to take 4 different tools and rotates to
bring the tool of choice into position. It is also able to be set at 45 degrees which is useful at times.
Do I mount the tools in the tool post directly, maybe with some shim
stock to put the cutting edge at exactly dead center, or do I still
need to use tool holders?

If I don't need tool holders, what size of tools do I need to use?
Measuring the tool post it looks like I could use up to 1/2" bits
before it would place the cutting edge above center.

(2) When I engage the back gears I cannot turn the chuck (i.e. I
currently only have 3 speeds), is there anything additional I need to
do to use this, or is there something actually wrong/needs oiling?

On the front of the Bull gear, the large gear under the front cover you will find a pin/plunger with a knurled head.
Pull the pin out. You should feel a detent. This pin locks the cone (the stepped pulleys which the belt run on) to the bull gear which is keyed to the spindle.
Without pulling the pin the front and rear gears on the spindle are locked together and the back gears cannot turn.
Should the pin come out completely? I was able to pull it out about
3/4", but now it just turns and I can't get it to budge either
direction, and the cone still appears to be locked to the bull gear.

(3) What accessories are "must haves"? Tool holders (maybe with a
different turret?), 4-jaw chuck? steady rests? The primary purpose is
automotive applications (I am restoring an old BMW motorcycle &
sidecar, and plan on restoring an old Porsche next), but I am
interested in general metalworking as well.

The 4 way toolpost is quite vestal. You may want to look at at Quick Change Tool post.
One member of the group, Jeff Beck (tools4cheep.com) has a good price on these.
This is a Model C lathe, did you get change gears with it.
Collets are useful for holding things very concentric.
I did not get any change gears, and looking through ebay the set can
be quite expensive. These are only used for threading, right?

Thanks again for the information!

Michael


Weight of Lathe

rda1267 <rda1267@...>
 

I haven't seen this anywhere in FAQ or on the posts since 1/5/07.

Does anyone have an estimation of the weight of a 1946 16" with 10
ft bed. I am about to become the owner of one and am looking to see
if my tractor can pick it up. (about 3000 # limit)

An information is appreciated.
Thanks
David


Keep Your Lathe In Trim

a4x6band
 

This afternoon while rooting through a bunch of books in my shop I
discovered a reprint of South Bend's Bulletin H-4, "How To Keep Your
Lathe In Trim" that I didn't know I had. Much to my delight it
answered many of the questions I had asked the list over the past
couple of days. There are instructions for checking and adjusting the
spindle bearings and removing the the spindle on a lathe very much
like my 11 inch.

As it turns out my spindle bearings clearance is exactly on
specification at .001. End play was excessive at .005 so adjusted
that according to the directions in the book. Actual removal of the
spindle will wait until I have some felt to replace the wipers. This
book is something every new South Bend owner should have. I believe
it may still be available from Lindsay Publications.

Fergus

PS: Still looking for SB 11 inch manuals.


Babbit brearings

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi all

Now these parts are really confusing me. Check out ebay auction
190072885971 and tell me these are not babbit bearings. The bearing
caps look like they may have come off of a 8 Jr. or the 1934 420 or
520 lathe. My 410 has bronze bearings. Hmmmmmm

Turk


Re: Weight of Lathe

NascrThndr@...
 

I'll say off the top of my head that you are looking at all of 2000 lbs. If you have a tractor that can handle 3,000 lbs you should be ok.
Dave
 
 

In a message dated 01/15/2007 7:10:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, rda1267@... writes:

I haven't seen this anywhere in FAQ or on the posts since 1/5/07.

Does anyone have an estimation of the weight of a 1946 16" with 10
ft bed. I am about to become the owner of one and am looking to see
if my tractor can pick it up. (about 3000 # limit)

An information is appreciated.
Thanks
David

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