Date   

Re: Spindle adjustment

strictlystainles@...
 

I dont have a clue how to adjust the end play on the spindle. I just tighten
the nut on the end until I do not feel any play in the spindle. Probably not
the right way but it has worked so far.

I am putting together my new 9 in SB and I dont have a clue how to hold down
the little springy felt oilers underneath the spindle while I slip the
spindle in. Any one wanna offer a suggestion or two. Thank you


Gerald
Iowa


Re: Chucks

edward4583@...
 

Thanks for the info on the headstock chuck. I'll plan my repair/ disassembly very carefully.
Ed


Re: Made some leveling feet for my 10L

David Hobday <davidhh80@yahoo.com>
 

Those look pretty nice there Dave. Good work.
Dave
--- Dave Kochan <dave@toolbit.net> wrote:
I think it's a pretty decent design. Check it out
at:

http://www.toolbit.net/feet

Let me know what you think.

- Dave



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Re: Dial indicators

Rick Kruger <krugerr@...>
 

Good stuff, Mark. I like using indicators too. I have a Trav-A-Dial I'll be mounting on the saddle, but your setup for the cross slide looks very neat. I'll have to give that a try.

Rick K.
Portland, OR

At 05:20 AM 3/25/02 +0000, you wrote:
I find I like to use indicators instead of the dials on the cranks.
I've posted two photos in the photo area showing my cross slide
indicator and my travel indicator. The travel indicator is made from
a casting you can buy at:
http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/index.html

-Mark


Dial indicators

wacko_okcaw <marko99@...>
 

I find I like to use indicators instead of the dials on the cranks.
I've posted two photos in the photo area showing my cross slide
indicator and my travel indicator. The travel indicator is made from
a casting you can buy at:
http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/index.html

-Mark


Re: Ham Radio lathe opperators

w keith griffith
 

N7IVS,,, haven't been on anything but 2M in years.,,,

HF to return "Real Soon Now"

At 03:20 PM 3/23/02 -0600, you wrote:
I do work a little hf now and then. It has been
a while. I have noticed that there are several
hams on this list.

Dallas Shell
n5fee

<<. Do
you ever get on 3.963 or 4228.5????
Benny WB5TYZ>>





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Made some leveling feet for my 10L

Dave Kochan
 

I think it's a pretty decent design. Check it out at:

http://www.toolbit.net/feet

Let me know what you think.

- Dave


Re: Chucks

shapeaholic <shapeaholic@...>
 

Try Dave Sobel at Sobel Machinery.
Several years ago he was able to match up a jaw for a skinner chuck
for me. nice guy to deal with too.
Pete

--- In southbendlathe@y..., "tlmkr1605" <edward4583@a...> wrote:
Hey guys,
I have a Skinner 6" junior 4 jaw chuck for my 9" A that has a broken
jaw screw. Does anyone have a resource for a replacement or a spare
they are willing to part with? It is 11/16 dia. with an 8 tpi and 2
3/8 long with 5/16 square drive. Also, my Jacobs headstock chuck #59B
appears to have either a couple of bad spots or chips inside as it
locks up when chucking. Do these come apart for repair without
destroying them?
Thanks
ED


Re: Half nut restoration

gorvil
 

Hi Ed,



Thanks for the reply. I had the same thought as you about leaving some room for thread adhesion, but I was also thinking that a sleeve soldered into the half nuts would solve the problem of the two halves wanting to separate. I bored the hole out to about .830 and turned a piece of bronze sprue from the bronze casting class recycle bin to fit. This will leave a thin web between the two halves that I can remove with my dull hacksaw and clean up with my broken rusty file.



I bought a 3/4" x 8 tandem Acme tap on e-Bay a few months ago and I have been itchin' to try it.



Glen Reeser

--- In southbendlathe@y..., edward4583@a... wrote:

Glen,
I posted on this around January. I had mine built up with WELCO 14 BARE
nickel silver alloy. I just got my 9" running last week and the halfnuts I
rebuilt with this procedure are as good as a new set if not better. Here are
a few added thoughts in addition to the article.
1. I did all my work on a Bridgeport mill. This procedure can be done on the
lathe as in the article but the mill setup is sturdier
2. I bored the original threads out to .85 dia. I reasoned this would leave
.05 of alloy to act as a "base" for the threads.
3. The halfnuts appear to be made from a single casting and split down the
middle with a 1/8 cutter after all factory machinery is complete. When I
sized and cleaned up the silver solder I left the center portions heavy so
there would be .005 or less between the two nuts when in the fixture. (In the
fixture the nuts are in the engaged position on the lathe.) In hindsight I
believe this step was the basis for my threads coming out as good as they
did. I'll explain. I purchased a new tandem acme tap for this project and
during tapping I had to add clamps over the threaded portion of the nuts as
the casting would flex away from the tap. I tapped about 1/4 turn and backed
out. I did this while advancing 1/8 to 1/4 turn each time. By having a full
diameter of metal around the tap I experienced none of the "breakout" that
would have been felt with the 1/8" gap between the nuts. Also, you can
purchase a single stage acme plug tap for about 1/3 the price of a tandem.
Don't even try to do this with an acme plug tap. I think the nuts would break
from the forces required to remove all the metal with the single thread
former on the plug.
I have spent the last year rebuilding my 9" and at some point in time I plan
to post pictures in the files sections so the group can see my toys. In this
was to be pictures of these nuts and the fixture. If you have any questions
feel free to contact me.
Keep turning!
Ed
9" Model A
(Broken file)
(hacksaw)


Re: Chucks

catboat15@...
 

In a message dated 3/24/2002 10:13:40 AM Pacific Standard Time, jdspear@... writes:


Also, my Jacobs headstock chuck #59B
appears to have either a couple of bad spots or chips inside as it
locks up when chucking. Do these come apart for repair without
destroying them?


Yes, the Jacob chucks come apart. There is a web site from Jacobs that gives directions on how to do it. In general, the outer sleeve is a press fit on the chuck body and needs to be pressed off.  Then it falls apart with the jaws and gear exposed. Warning though, on some or maybe all Jacobs chucks there is a ring that is broken. When you see that broken ring the novice will want to replace it, then can not assemble the chuck again.  The ring is hardend and broken at the factory.
Be careful to get the jaws back in the right place or the chuck will not close concentric. If your chuck is the kind that screws directly onto the spindle take good care of it as they are not made anymore.

John Meacham
California High Desert
12 inch Atlas, Minimill, rusty file


Re: Half nut restoration

gorvil
 

Hi John,

One of my many other hobbies is jewelry making (let's call it
investment casting here, it sounds more macho). I was intending to use
some of the solder I use for soldering silver to silver. I have
several different grades "hard, medium, eazy, extra eazy". They are
intended to be used in multiple step fabrication processes where the
next solder operation uses a lower temp solder than the last. This
worked fine on the cross slide nuts I made, but that was soldering
bronze to bronze. I have never tried it on cast iron.

Glen Reeser ...



--- In southbendlathe@y..., catboat15@a... wrote:
In a message dated 3/22/2002 8:58:15 PM Pacific Standard Time,
Gorvil@a...
writes:


I am a bit leary of brazing
bronze as the melting points may be incompatible.

Use a low temperature silver solder such as EasyFlo or PhosCopper.
Both melt
and run far below the melting point of bronze. Some here will not
use
PhosCopper on boilers because of the sulfer products in coal fired
locomotives, so don't burn coal on your lathe if you use PhosCopper
;-]

John Meacham
California High Desert
12 inch Atlas, Minimill,


Re: Half nut restoration

gorvil
 

Thanks for the reply Ed,

My thinking was along the same lines as yours. I bored out the old
threads to about .830 and planned to silver solder a sleeve turned
from a bronze casting sprue. The extra material would hold the two
halves together during the threading operation. A hack saw and a
broken rusty file would do to separate the two halves and clean up the
saw kerf.

I purchased a tandem Acme tap on E-bay a couple of months ago and I
have been itchin to try it ever since.

Glen Reeser....

--- In southbendlathe@y..., edward4583@a... wrote:
Glen,
I posted on this around January. I had mine built up with WELCO 14
BARE
nickel silver alloy. I just got my 9" running last week and the
halfnuts I
rebuilt with this procedure are as good as a new set if not better.
Here are
a few added thoughts in addition to the article.
1. I did all my work on a Bridgeport mill. This procedure can be
done on the
lathe as in the article but the mill setup is sturdier
2. I bored the original threads out to .85 dia. I reasoned this
would leave
.05 of alloy to act as a "base" for the threads.
3. The halfnuts appear to be made from a single casting and split
down the
middle with a 1/8 cutter after all factory machinery is complete.
When I
sized and cleaned up the silver solder I left the center portions
heavy so
there would be .005 or less between the two nuts when in the
fixture. (In the
fixture the nuts are in the engaged position on the lathe.) In
hindsight I
believe this step was the basis for my threads coming out as good as
they
did. I'll explain. I purchased a new tandem acme tap for this
project and
during tapping I had to add clamps over the threaded portion of the
nuts as
the casting would flex away from the tap. I tapped about 1/4 turn
and backed
out. I did this while advancing 1/8 to 1/4 turn each time. By having
a full
diameter of metal around the tap I experienced none of the
"breakout" that
would have been felt with the 1/8" gap between the nuts. Also, you
can
purchase a single stage acme plug tap for about 1/3 the price of a
tandem.
Don't even try to do this with an acme plug tap. I think the nuts
would break
from the forces required to remove all the metal with the single
thread
former on the plug.
I have spent the last year rebuilding my 9" and at some point in
time I plan
to post pictures in the files sections so the group can see my toys.
In this
was to be pictures of these nuts and the fixture. If you have any
questions
feel free to contact me.
Keep turning!
Ed
9" Model


Introduction

hweidman01 <hweidman@...>
 

Hello group members!

Found this group a while ago & have enjoyed reading & learning -
decided it's time to start participating.

Have had a '49 9" model C 3' for a while. It was given to me by a
generous uncle who was no longer using it. He bought the lathe used
when he was only 15 - would have been about 1963. He actually only
used it for a few years, after which it sat for more than 20 yrs till
I cleaned it up & started using it.

The old lathe is in very good condition w no discernable wear on the
ways. The downside is that most of the change gears were stored in a
box that was kept in a damp area and were destroyed by rust.

Now...a couple of questions I'd like to ask:

Seems that the 9" models, the 10K, and 10L were all in production at
the same time for some number of years. I understand that the 9" and
the 10K are very similar and wonder why they continued with both?
Almost seems like the 10K might have been a replacement for the 9".
Any comments?

Also, I've often wondered how much difference there is in performance
between the 9" or 10K and the heavy 10 (10L)?

Regards,
Herb


Re: Chucks

edward4583@...
 

Jon,
Thanks for the tips and info. I thought about making a screw for this but the original is hardened and when chucking up and centering in the four jaw I don't know if I like the idea of switching drivers to adjust the jaws. I may go this way depending on the cost/ availability of the part.
ED


Re: Chucks

Jonathan Spear <jdspear@...>
 

For your 4-jaw chuck, why not make a replacement screw on your lathe?  You will have to grind a cutter bit to match the thread profile of one of your existing screws.  It probably will be hard to make a square indentation to match the original, but maybe you can get by with just cutting a slot in it for a regular flat blade screwdriver.  I would use soft steel as a material for the screw.
 
For servicing Jacobs chucks, check out this link:
 
Good luck, Jon Spear
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: tlmkr1605 <edward4583@...>
To: southbendlathe@... <southbendlathe@...>
Date: Sunday, March 24, 2002 6:02 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Chucks

Hey guys,
I have a Skinner 6" junior 4 jaw chuck for my 9" A that has a broken
jaw screw. Does anyone have a resource for a replacement or a spare
they are willing to part with? It is 11/16 dia. with an 8 tpi and 2
3/8 long with 5/16 square drive. Also, my Jacobs headstock chuck #59B
appears to have either a couple of bad spots or chips inside as it
locks up when chucking. Do these come apart for repair without
destroying them?
Thanks
ED


Re: Dumore 44 Tool Post Grinder

Ken Mayer
 

Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 18:16:56 -0800
From: "Paul R. Hvidston" <paul@70.dsl.11.uia.net>

I chanced into an OLD Dumore 44 tool post grinder today at an industrial
yard sale. It's lacking spindle pulleys, nuts, wheels, belt/wheel guards
and
belt, but at least the motor runs and the spindle turns smoothly ;-) I'm
not
even sure what size/types of wheels this thing is supposed to use. Also, I
think I've seen pictures with a collet attachment for inside grinding???

Anybody own one of these? Can you help me figure out what I need to get
this
little gem in the rough going with my 9" SBL?

Parts are available from http://www.dumorecorp.com/

Ken
:-)


Re: Dumore 44 Tool Post Grinder

Paul R. Hvidston <paul@...>
 

Thanks, guys,

Yup, I saw the pictures/descriptions at Dumore and some of the supply
houses. If anybody has spare parts, maybe we could trade? I've still got
some gears and such for a 9" model A SBL.

Regards,

Paul R. Hvidston, N6MGN
ACKSYS Engineering
Upland, CA
p.hvidston@ieee.org

----- Original Message -----
From: "jdspear9" <jdspear@alumni.princeton.edu>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, March 24, 2002 2:09 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Dumore 44 Tool Post Grinder


Paul,

You can see a picture of the current Dumore model 44 tool post
grinder kit on page 1811 of the current MSC Industrial catalog:

http://www.mscdirect.com/PDF.process?pdf=1811

Rutland Airgas also carries this model of tool post grinder.

The pulley wheels are ones that you could make yourself on the
lathe. They have a sort of rounded profile which helps keep the flat
belt aligned on the pulley wheels (flat belts tend to climb to the
area of greatest radius).

I think you can probably get more info directly from Dumore.

Good luck,
Jon Spear


--- In southbendlathe@y..., "Paul R. Hvidston" <paul@7...> wrote:
I chanced into an OLD Dumore 44 tool post grinder today at an
industrial
yard sale. It's lacking spindle pulleys, nuts, wheels, belt/wheel
guards and
belt, but at least the motor runs and the spindle turns smoothly
;-) I'm not
even sure what size/types of wheels this thing is supposed to use.
Also, I
think I've seen pictures with a collet attachment for inside
grinding???

Anybody own one of these? Can you help me figure out what I need to
get this
little gem in the rough going with my 9" SBL?

Regards,

Paul R. Hvidston, N6MGN
ACKSYS Engineering
Upland, CA


Re: Dumore 44 Tool Post Grinder

Marty Escarcega <escarcega@...>
 

I have a 44, I have most of the pulleys and could measure the for
you Paul.

Marty


Re: Dumore 44 Tool Post Grinder

Webb Wyman <grotto-man@...>
 

Hi Paul,
 
I own one of these tool post grinders.  What is the serial number?  The first four digits of the serial number determine the model number.  The "44" is the series number. 
 
FYI, I put three spare pulleys I had up on eBay a couple of days ago.  Just do a search on "dumore" and you will find them.  I also have some other spare parts but I wanted to see how well the pulleys do first.  You can also still get these from Dumore too.
 
Anyway, you will enjoy that grinder.  IMHO it is the right size for the SBL 9 and 10K machines.  They are also good on the 10L too.
 
Good Luck with your new "toy"!
- Blue Chips -
Webb
 


Re: Please ID this carrige stop

Webb Wyman <grotto-man@...>
 

 
Hi Mark,
 
There is an identical unit on ebay right now.  Try the link below.
 
 
The brass thumb screw is from an old lamp.  It should be steel.
 
Good Luck!
- Blue Chips -
Webb
 
 
Hello Folks,

Could anyone of you look at the photo links below and tell me what lathe
this carriage stop was made for? I have been using it on my South Bend
Heavy-10 (10L) but the screw does not hit the pad on the carriage. It
works, but I believe it was built for an 8 inch, 9 inch, or light 10
(10K) lathe??

The distance from the center of the top of the "V" to the center of the
stop screw is 1-1/4 inch, the length of the stop screw is about 4-3/16
inch, the length of V-way is about 2.0 inch, and the dial moves the stop
screw .125 inch per dial revolution.

Thanks in advance!

http://pic4.picturetrail.com:80/VOL58/437576/655255/7432364.jpg

http://pic4.picturetrail.com:80/VOL58/437576/655255/7432360.jpg

http://pic4.picturetrail.com:80/VOL58/437576/655255/7432347.jpg

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