Date   

Re: Ham Radio lathe opperators

Paul R. Hvidston <paul@...>
 

If you guys ever set up a time, don't forget about us on the west coast.

73

Paul R. Hvidston, N6MGN
ACKSYS Engineering
Upland, CA

----- Original Message -----
From: "bennyrhoads" <dusty140@msn.com>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2002 2:14 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Ham Radio lathe opperators


Dallas, one of the freq's I gave you was wrong...The second should
read 7228.5...Maybe we could get some on the air forums going
also..Where are you at Dallas? I'm in Buna TX,100 miles east of
Houston right on the TX/LA Border 30 miles above Orange.....

Benny WB5TYZ





-- In southbendlathe@y..., "Dallas Shell" <n5fee@y...> wrote:
I do work a little hf now and then. It has been
a while. I have noticed that there are several
hams on this list.

Dallas Shell
n5fee

<<. Do
you ever get on 3.963 or 4228.5????
Benny WB5TYZ>>


Re: Ham Radio lathe opperators

Steven J. Devine <steve@...>
 

Steve Devine, Tech N1YZJ

I do work a little hf now and then. It has been
a while. I have noticed that there are several
hams on this list.

Dallas Shell
n5fee

<<. Do
you ever get on 3.963 or 4228.5????
Benny WB5TYZ>>




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Re: Half nut restoration

Steve Odle <sbodle@...>
 

Help! One of my students busted the gears on the lead screw's drive on
wends. I forgot which lathe that was, but believe it is one of my
Clausing's? Can someone help with a source to by new/ used gears. These
belong to the high school where I began teaching this year. Boy you can
forget a lot when you haven't touched something in ten years! Thats how long
it's been since I ran a lathe at SIUC! Help! thanks in advance guys! Steve
Odle AVC Instructor Mt. Vernon,IL.

-----Original Message-----
From: gorvil <Gorvil@aol.com>
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Friday, March 22, 2002 11:02 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Half nut restoration


--- In southbendlathe@y..., "gorvil" <Gorvil@a...> wrote:
--- In southbendlathe@y..., "gorvil" <Gorvil@a...> wrote:
Hi All,

I built the fixture described in HSM for restoring half nuts. I
have
bored out the old threads and now I am thinking of silver
soldering
a
bronze sleeve in the resulting hole to be threaded 3/4 " x 8 Acme.

I have never silver soldered cast iron. I am a bit leary of
brazing
bronze as the melting points may be incompatible.

Any thoughts?

Glen Ree
Somehow my name got shortened

Glen Rees
I don't know what is going on here.

Glen Reeser .......



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Re: Ham Radio lathe opperators

bennyrhoads <dusty140@...>
 

Dallas, one of the freq's I gave you was wrong...The second should
read 7228.5...Maybe we could get some on the air forums going
also..Where are you at Dallas? I'm in Buna TX,100 miles east of
Houston right on the TX/LA Border 30 miles above Orange.....

Benny WB5TYZ

-- In southbendlathe@y..., "Dallas Shell" <n5fee@y...> wrote:
I do work a little hf now and then. It has been
a while. I have noticed that there are several
hams on this list.

Dallas Shell
n5fee

<<. Do
you ever get on 3.963 or 4228.5????
Benny WB5TYZ>>




_________________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com


Ham Radio lathe opperators

Dallas
 

I do work a little hf now and then. It has been
a while. I have noticed that there are several
hams on this list.

Dallas Shell
n5fee

<<. Do
you ever get on 3.963 or 4228.5????
Benny WB5TYZ>>




_________________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com


Re: Beginner question

Gene McLemore (Sonoran Desert Region)
 

Thanks a lot for the information. I have most of it together but missing the tailstock spindle. I don't know how the Phx. Police found it but was glad.

gene




Beginner question

Gene McLemore (Sonoran Desert Region)
 

I have just inherited a S.B. 9" lathe, how do you tell if it is an A,B, or C?
This lathe was taken apart and stolen but the Police recovered it and arrests made. I am now trying to assemble it back together. My father bought it in the thirties in Seattle. We moved it to Phoenix and reassembled it, then the bad guys took it apart.
Thanks,

gene




Mounting SB9 Taper Attachment (very long)

Rick Kruger <krugerr@...>
 

This was an offlist exchange, that I thought some here might find useful, or at least hope so.

Rick K.
Portland, OR

Mark,

Well, since you have the SB instructions, you have the process, but may be lacking some details, as was I. My instructions say to mount the bed bracket to the saddle and that it should be parallel with the top of the lathe bed and referred to Fig. 4. Fig. 4 shows some vague indicator thing across the ways, angled differently on each side, indicating off of the TA top swivel bar (not the TA bed bar). This was the biggest challenge, how to mount an indicator on the bed ways such that it could be moved to each side and read the same. Nothing about their drawing gave any hints. (I hadn't noticed until now that the indicator is shown indicating on the top swivel bar, but what I think you have to do is indicate on the TA bed bar).

I came up with two ways of doing it. One was to use a telescoping bore gage between the side of the lathe bed and the TA bed bar. No photo of this, just the gage and a 2-3" mic on the piece of wood. (IndicatingRear.JPG) The other was with a machined cast iron base that had an inverted Vee milled in it. This base rode on the inside Vee and Flat ways that the tailstock rides on. My 0.0001" indicator on a magnetic base mounted on it, adjusted to indicate on the TA bed bar (shown in all the photos). This could slide between the saddle enough that it could indicate both ends of the TA bed bar. I had to be careful in moving it, making sure the indicator was quite tight and I didn't bump the base when setting it down, and moved the indicator slowly on/off the bed bar. This was the technique I ended up using. I did check it with the telescoping gage afterward and found it was as good as the indicator. The gage is probably more reliable as it is a direct reading.

One problem I had to solve before either method would work was that the side of the bed bar was not straight/parallel with the bottom dovetails. This was corrected by taking it to my friend's full sized BP mill clone and milling the side of the bed bar straight/flat/parallel to the dovetail. With the bed bar clamped in the mill vise with the culprit side up, we used reamer blanks riding in the dovetail and a depth mic to measure the distance between the edge of the bar and the dovetail/reamer blank. We indicated on the reamer blank and adjusted the bar until it read nearly no difference between ends. Then we milled the edge of the bar and indicated both the dovetail and bar edge. We had to make several passes before getting it right. I didn't like having to mill the bar, but I couldn't see another way to do it.

I had thought of making a test bar to fit in the dovetail, were the central part of the bar would have a dovetail cut in it and the outer ends it would be milled flat for use with the indicator. That would allow the TA bed bracket to be adjusted parallel without having to machine the bed bar.

I used steel shim material to adjust to get the bed bracket dovetail parallel to the lathe bed. It ended up taking only a 0.001" shim, so it was fairly close already. My bed bracket had been machined where it mounts to the lathe bed and was not perfectly flat. My friend scraped it flatter, but didn't take it all the way.

Once it was parallel with the shim, I used the same indicator/base to indicate the height, bumping the bed bracket up or down with a deadblow hammer until the readings were good enough. (There was no other option here, such as a telescoping gage, so I suggest you find a way to do this with one of your indicators.) Tightened the bolts and checked it again, readusted as needed until it was good when fully tightened.

I haven't drilled the dowel pin holes yet, not sure how necessary it is. Only would be if there is a need to disassemble it, or if it moves.

The milled CI base I used was something I had around, from another project that took a different turn and didn't need the base. I think any piece of metal could be milled to work. Steel if you have a magnetic indicator, or alum. if you can drill/tap it for a screw mount of some sort. The trick of course would be to get the Vee milled in it. In my case, I went to great length to get the Vee such that the topside was parallel to the base, but that was on a different machine (minilathe 7x12) and it didn't matter in this application.

After getting the bed adjusted, there was the matter of babbitting the clamp. This was intimidating at first, but was not difficult. I happen to have a Neycraft burnout oven (that I just got and hadn't used yet), which I used to melt out the existing babbitt, and melt that babbitt to repour the clamp. My friend with the mill came up with a tiny chunk of babbitt to make-up a little more than needed. I used modeling clay to build two little dams around the top babbitt holes. I didn't heat the clamp or bar before pouring the babbitt, figured I could re-do it easily if it didn't work out. It didn't fill all the spaces, but it worked out well enough that I probably won't redo it just now.

Testing it all out, the TA seems to work fine. Adjusting the swivel bar by running the slide back and forth, turned out the zero marks line up just right with the existing witness marks, so I think it turned our right.

At 12:39 PM 3/22/02 -0500, you wrote:
Rick,
How much effort did you have to go through to get it working smoothly? I
have an instruction sheet from South Bend but have not attacked the project
just yet. I remember the thread that ensued after your request for info,
but I'd like to hear what you had to go through.

Thanks

Mark


Re: Half nut restoration

Randy <rpedersen@...>
 

Glen:

That's alright it happens to us all eventually. ;-)

Randy Pedersen
Atlas 618
South Bend 9" A
South Bend 9" C
Enco Mill Drill Model 1100
Salina, KS
rpedersen@kscable.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "gorvil" <Gorvil@aol.com>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 22, 2002 11:02 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Half nut restoration



I don't know what is going on here.

Glen Reeser .......


Re: SB Tailstock Dauber

bennyrhoads <dusty140@...>
 

Thanks Dalals, I figured it was brass after reading about it in a
1934 reprint of a South Bend lathe Manual, but never knew what they
were talking about, as they never showed a picture of it. Now that I
know what it is, I can identify the round knob in about 10 - 15
different pictures I have of a Tailstock...Thanks for the help. Do
you ever get on 3.963 or 4228.5????
Benny WB5TYZ




--- In southbendlathe@y..., "Dallas Shell" <n5fee@y...> wrote:
Benny,

The dauber is made out of brass, it has a good finish on it so it
was
probably turned or if it was cast it was well finished and
polished. My
part has probably never been cleaned up, it has a very dark patina
like old
brass gets.

Dallas

<<Dallas, I got the picture...Thanks so much..What material was used
Brass maybe ?>>


Re: Engineering Site

Matt Pierce <ml_roak@...>
 

Dan,
You don't have to worry about being the only hillbilly (in my neck of the
woods they call us "hicks") around this fire that don't know much of what
your doing. I like to think I learn something new everyday, although it
doesn't always work out that way ;-)

Matt (proud hick) Pierce

----- Original Message -----
From: "dan16_24" <oldtriumphs@hotmail.com>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 22, 2002 8:54 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Engineering Site


As a newcomer to the group, I was not familiar with your posting
procedures and another member (David Berger) that liked this site
suggested that I re-post it differently.

Mario - No, I am not a country lawyer. I told you I'm just a dumb old
hillbilly that may not be able to assist anyone with anything as I'm
still learning on a daily basis myself.

Most of you may be aware of this site http://www.efunda.com/home.cfm
and it may have been suggested before, but if it hasn't a few of you
might like it. The site is comprised of a wealth of beneficial
engineering formulas / conversion charts / processes / materials /
mathematics / units & constants / and other info. Be sure to check
out the "more" categories under each listing of subject matter. The
site looks to be superficial at first glance, but after navigating a
bit it becomes evident that the site has depth. I like the "cool"
calculator (top right of the home page) and other features on the
tool bar.

Dan 16_24

9" 608 Rivett
16/24 x 6 South Bend


Re: Half nut restoration

gorvil
 

--- In southbendlathe@y..., "gorvil" <Gorvil@a...> wrote:
--- In southbendlathe@y..., "gorvil" <Gorvil@a...> wrote:
Hi All,

I built the fixture described in HSM for restoring half nuts. I
have
bored out the old threads and now I am thinking of silver
soldering
a
bronze sleeve in the resulting hole to be threaded 3/4 " x 8 Acme.

I have never silver soldered cast iron. I am a bit leary of
brazing
bronze as the melting points may be incompatible.

Any thoughts?

Glen Ree
Somehow my name got shortened

Glen Rees
I don't know what is going on here.

Glen Reeser .......


Re: Half nut restoration

gorvil
 

--- In southbendlathe@y..., "gorvil" <Gorvil@a...> wrote:
Hi All,

I built the fixture described in HSM for restoring half nuts. I
have
bored out the old threads and now I am thinking of silver soldering
a
bronze sleeve in the resulting hole to be threaded 3/4 " x 8 Acme.

I have never silver soldered cast iron. I am a bit leary of brazing
bronze as the melting points may be incompatible.

Any thoughts?

Glen Ree
Somehow my name got shortened

Glen Rees


Half nut restoration

gorvil
 

Hi All,

I built the fixture described in HSM for restoring half nuts. I have
bored out the old threads and now I am thinking of silver soldering a
bronze sleeve in the resulting hole to be threaded 3/4 " x 8 Acme.

I have never silver soldered cast iron. I am a bit leary of brazing
bronze as the melting points may be incompatible.

Any thoughts?

Glen Ree


Re: Half nut restoration

edward4583@...
 

Glen,
I posted on this around January. I had mine built up with WELCO 14 BARE
nickel silver alloy. I just got my 9" running last week and the halfnuts I
rebuilt with this procedure are as good as a new set if not better. Here are
a few added thoughts in addition to the article.
1. I did all my work on a Bridgeport mill. This procedure can be done on the
lathe as in the article but the mill setup is sturdier
2. I bored the original threads out to .85 dia. I reasoned this would leave
.05 of alloy to act as a "base" for the threads.
3. The halfnuts appear to be made from a single casting and split down the
middle with a 1/8 cutter after all factory machinery is complete. When I
sized and cleaned up the silver solder I left the center portions heavy so
there would be .005 or less between the two nuts when in the fixture. (In the
fixture the nuts are in the engaged position on the lathe.) In hindsight I
believe this step was the basis for my threads coming out as good as they
did. I'll explain. I purchased a new tandem acme tap for this project and
during tapping I had to add clamps over the threaded portion of the nuts as
the casting would flex away from the tap. I tapped about 1/4 turn and backed
out. I did this while advancing 1/8 to 1/4 turn each time. By having a full
diameter of metal around the tap I experienced none of the "breakout" that
would have been felt with the 1/8" gap between the nuts. Also, you can
purchase a single stage acme plug tap for about 1/3 the price of a tandem.
Don't even try to do this with an acme plug tap. I think the nuts would break
from the forces required to remove all the metal with the single thread
former on the plug.
I have spent the last year rebuilding my 9" and at some point in time I plan
to post pictures in the files sections so the group can see my toys. In this
was to be pictures of these nuts and the fixture. If you have any questions
feel free to contact me.
Keep turning!
Ed
9" Model A
(Broken file)
(hacksaw)


Re: Engineering Site

Dan
 

Mario,

No, I didn't take you seriously and as a matter a fact I got a
chuckle out of it. A person that can't share a little humor
occasionally must live a pretty dull life. I'm glad that you found
the site useful.

I agree that we need to continue the dialogue regarding the cycles
via personal e-mail.

Dan 16_24

9" 608 Rivett
16/24" x 6' South Bend


--- In southbendlathe@y..., "chippuller" <mariol.vitale@a...> wrote:
Dan,
I hope you didn't take me seriously. I was just kidding about
the "country lawywer", but I'm sure you're not "dumb". And besides,
I
know I am,as I suspect everyone on this group is, learning every
day.
In fact the the only person I'd call dumb, is one who is NOT
learning
everyday!
By the way, I noticed the "old triumphs" byline in your address.
I
still have a 1967 500cc "Jack Pine" that I bought new. I'd be
interested in hearing what you have. Of course if we talk
motorcycles, we should probably do it off line so we don't burden
the
rest of the list with it.
Regards,
Mario


SB Tailstock Dauber

Dallas
 

Benny,

The dauber is made out of brass, it has a good finish on it so it was
probably turned or if it was cast it was well finished and polished. My
part has probably never been cleaned up, it has a very dark patina like old
brass gets.

Dallas

<<Dallas, I got the picture...Thanks so much..What material was used
Brass maybe ?>>


Re: Engineering Site

chippuller
 

Dan,
I hope you didn't take me seriously. I was just kidding about
the "country lawywer", but I'm sure you're not "dumb". And besides, I
know I am,as I suspect everyone on this group is, learning every day.
In fact the the only person I'd call dumb, is one who is NOT learning
everyday!
By the way, I noticed the "old triumphs" byline in your address. I
still have a 1967 500cc "Jack Pine" that I bought new. I'd be
interested in hearing what you have. Of course if we talk
motorcycles, we should probably do it off line so we don't burden the
rest of the list with it.
Regards,
Mario


Engineering Site

Dan
 

As a newcomer to the group, I was not familiar with your posting
procedures and another member (David Berger) that liked this site
suggested that I re-post it differently.

Mario - No, I am not a country lawyer. I told you I'm just a dumb old
hillbilly that may not be able to assist anyone with anything as I'm
still learning on a daily basis myself.

Most of you may be aware of this site http://www.efunda.com/home.cfm
and it may have been suggested before, but if it hasn't a few of you
might like it. The site is comprised of a wealth of beneficial
engineering formulas / conversion charts / processes / materials /
mathematics / units & constants / and other info. Be sure to check
out the "more" categories under each listing of subject matter. The
site looks to be superficial at first glance, but after navigating a
bit it becomes evident that the site has depth. I like the "cool"
calculator (top right of the home page) and other features on the
tool bar.

Dan 16_24

9" 608 Rivett
16/24 x 6 South Bend


Re: Speaking of Aprons

Steve Odle <sbodle@...>
 

How about 6'2" 335?

-----Original Message-----
From: William Ruehl <wruehl@hotmail.com>
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thursday, March 21, 2002 9:45 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Speaking of Aprons


I got one of the leather ones from grizzly and it has been holding up well.
Had to lengthen the strap a bit though. Apparently there are not that many
6'4" 375lb men in china. :-)

http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?Product_ID=14089&&User_ID=757677&S
t
=1324&St2=64735870&St3=-48698056&DS_ID=1

----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Odle" <sbodle@midwest.net>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, March 21, 2002 9:27 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Speaking of Aprons


May be too tough for machine shop,but- a welders leather apron can save a
lot of clothing and will not shrink unless heated above and beyond normal
temps.
-----Original Message-----
From: pjwizr_1999 <pjwizr_1999@yahoo.com>
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thursday, March 21, 2002 8:46 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Speaking of Aprons


Speaking of aprons, does anybody know where I can find a good heavy,
LONG shop apron that doesnt shrink 25% whn washed?? I am 6 ft tall,
circa 200 lbs so not a giant at all. I keep buying the longest ones
at TrueValue ( dark blue cotton, about $6, turn it inside out if you
dont like pockets) because it is the biggest and sturdiest one I can
find, but the dang things shrink 20 -25% when washed ONCE. I want one
that comes over my knees when sitting down at a stool or bench for
tabletop work and this one is the right size - BEFORE washing. Please
don't make my 68 year old mother make me new aprons, tell me where I
can find a good one.



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