Date   

Re: Gear Cover

fl.lusen
 

Thanks Turk and to everyone else who answered. Now I can get on with it.

Fred

-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Turk
Subject: Gear Cover
Hi Fred

Babbitt can be gotten from McMaster Carr in California.


Re: Gear Cover

David Smith <homessearch@...>
 


--- In southbendlathe@..., "Fred Lusen" wrote:
>
> Dave,
>
> Guess what? There is no link to create a new album there either.
>
> What gives?
>
> Fred
>


9" telescopic steadyrest

Jeff Beck
 

Hi guys,
Im in the market for a 9" telescopic steady rest. any condition, even
broken is fine. Email me with what you have and a price.
thanks
Jeff


ENCO freeshiping and the trials of dial-up

physist@...
 

Get Free UPS Shipping* when you purchase $50 or more in merchandise from Enco through June 30, 2006.

To use this Free UPS Shipping Offer, enter promotional code: WEBRN66 in the promo code box on the shopping cart page when you visit use-enco.com , or give the code to your friendly sales associate when you order by phone at 800-USE-ENCO.

I am on holiday and using a dial-up connectiom. this is a Hi-quality 56K line provided by my employer.

ITS THE PITS.

I will have great concern for the po-folks stuck on this mode of communications in the future.

 

Jim B.

(In Hull Masstoday. Tormrrow is the start of my 50th college re-union at BC)

 


Re: Gear Cover

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Fred

Babbitt can be gotten from McMaster Carr in California. I use a
propane torch to melt the Babbitt. I also have a little cast iron
lead pot on a handle that I got at Bi-Mart in the gun section and is
used for melting lead for bullets. This little pot is just the right
size for doing a door hinge pin. I also use the propane torch to
melt the lead in the little pot that I put back in. I have done one
lathe were I was able to save all the Babbitt that came out of the
door and then pored it back in. This is the same process that SB
used on there taper attachment bed mount and also on the lead screw
end bearing at the tail stock end of your lathe. Again all these
places were SB used this process there was no machine work done to
the castings other than what was needed to mount things. I have
found it interesting how SB was so precise in some areas of
construction and so effectively crude in others. Hay it worked for
90 years.

Turk


--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "fl.lusen" <fl.lusen@...>
wrote:

Turk,

Thanks for the response. I am unfamiliar with Babbitt material.
What is
the easiest way to melt it? Would a MAP torch work? Now, where
would one
get linotype lead in this day and age?

Fred

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Dennis Turk
Sent: Wednesday, May 31, 2006 12:07 PM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Gear Cover

Hi Fred

OK your gear cover door pin is held in with Babbitt pored on
assembly using a centering fixture in the spindle.

If you pin is not to lose you can make up a drive sleeve that fits
over the pin and then drive the Babbitt back down around the knurls
of the pin. The hole in the casting is as cast and this is another
one of SB way of making something fit close without doing any
machines work.

Fred I melt the Babbitt out of the casting and I have made a
centering bushing for the spindle. This with the use of some
blocks
and clamps I hold the door in its correct position and then re-poor
the Babbitt. I actually use linotype lead in mine as it is harder
than the Babbitt SB used.

Turk.

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Lusen" <fl.lusen@>
wrote:

I have been off of the list for some time now but am finally
starting a
complete restoration of my 9A.

Has anyone removed the hinge pin from the gear cover? Mine is
wabbling
around so the cover does not close well without having to lift it
up.
Since there is nothing holding it in from the outside, I am
assuming
the cap on top is the only holding and centering device. From
what I
can see, the pin either needs to be driven out or the cap needs
to
be
ground away.

I have some photos but when I went to the photos page, the links,
Create New Album and Add Photos, are not present. The photos
section
is not full either.

Regards,

Fred






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Re: Gear Cover

Terry McCreary <terry.mccreary@...>
 

Fred and all:

Linotype metal is often available on Ebay. Two auctions going right now, 10 lb for about $15.

Best -- Terry

At 02:21 PM 5/31/2006, you wrote:
McMaster Carr has lead based babbit metal. Melting point 650 F

Clem

On May 31, 2006, at 1:04 PM, fl.lusen wrote:

Turk,

Thanks for the response. I am unfamiliar with Babbitt material. What is
the easiest way to melt it? Would a MAP torch work? Now, where would one
get linotype lead in this day and age?

Fred


Re: Gear Cover

Clem Jensen
 

McMaster Carr has lead based babbit metal. Melting point 650 F

Clem

On May 31, 2006, at 1:04 PM, fl.lusen wrote:

Turk,

Thanks for the response.  I am unfamiliar with Babbitt material.  What is
the easiest way to melt it?  Would a MAP torch work?  Now, where would one
get linotype lead in this day and age?

Fred

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@...
[mailto:southbendlathe@...]On Behalf Of Dennis Turk
Sent: Wednesday, May 31, 2006 12:07 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Gear Cover

Hi Fred

OK your gear cover door pin is held in with Babbitt pored on
assembly using a centering fixture in the spindle.

If you pin is not to lose you can make up a drive sleeve that fits
over the pin and then drive the Babbitt back down around the knurls
of the pin.  The hole in the casting is as cast and this is another
one of SB way of making something fit close without doing any
machines work.

Fred I melt the Babbitt out of the casting and I have made a
centering bushing for the spindle.  This with the use of some blocks
and clamps I hold the door in its correct position and then re-poor
the Babbitt.  I actually use linotype lead in mine as it is harder
than the Babbitt SB used.

Turk.

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Fred Lusen"
wrote:
>
> I have been off of the list for some time now but am finally
starting a
> complete restoration of my 9A.
>
> Has anyone removed the hinge pin from the gear cover?  Mine is
wabbling
> around so the cover does not close well without having to lift it
up.
> Since there is nothing holding it in from the outside, I am
assuming
> the cap on top is the only holding and centering device.  From
what I
> can see, the pin either needs to be driven out or the cap needs to
be
> ground away.
>
> I have some photos but when I went to the photos page, the links,
> Create New Album and Add Photos, are not present.  The photos
section
> is not full either.
>
> Regards,
>
> Fred
>







--
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More pix:  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SouthBendLathePix/
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Re: Gear Cover

fl.lusen
 

Turk,

Thanks for the response. I am unfamiliar with Babbitt material. What is
the easiest way to melt it? Would a MAP torch work? Now, where would one
get linotype lead in this day and age?

Fred

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Dennis Turk
Sent: Wednesday, May 31, 2006 12:07 PM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Gear Cover

Hi Fred

OK your gear cover door pin is held in with Babbitt pored on
assembly using a centering fixture in the spindle.

If you pin is not to lose you can make up a drive sleeve that fits
over the pin and then drive the Babbitt back down around the knurls
of the pin. The hole in the casting is as cast and this is another
one of SB way of making something fit close without doing any
machines work.

Fred I melt the Babbitt out of the casting and I have made a
centering bushing for the spindle. This with the use of some blocks
and clamps I hold the door in its correct position and then re-poor
the Babbitt. I actually use linotype lead in mine as it is harder
than the Babbitt SB used.

Turk.

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Lusen" <fl.lusen@...>
wrote:

I have been off of the list for some time now but am finally
starting a
complete restoration of my 9A.

Has anyone removed the hinge pin from the gear cover? Mine is
wabbling
around so the cover does not close well without having to lift it
up.
Since there is nothing holding it in from the outside, I am
assuming
the cap on top is the only holding and centering device. From
what I
can see, the pin either needs to be driven out or the cap needs to
be
ground away.

I have some photos but when I went to the photos page, the links,
Create New Album and Add Photos, are not present. The photos
section
is not full either.

Regards,

Fred






--
Web: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
More pix: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SouthBendLathePix/
Newbie guide: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SouthBendLathePix/ Files area
FAQ:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/files/SouthBendLatheFAQ.html
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Re: Early 415 Workshop lathe

Thomas G Brandl
 

Turk,
The 405 I have doesn't have the 'fish scales" either. I was not sure
if this was common or not. I almost thought it was maybe due it possibly
having a hardened bed. I guess not. The Korean SB bed I have has no 'fish
scales'. It is labeled "Hardened Bed".
Tom


|---------+------------------------------>
| | Dennis Turk |
| | <dennis.turk2@veriz|
| | on.net> |
| | Sent by: |
| | southbendlathe@yaho|
| | ogroups.com |
| | |
| | |
| | 05/31/2006 01:36 PM|
| | Please respond to |
| | southbendlathe |
| | |
|---------+------------------------------>
>---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| |
| To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com |
| cc: |
| Subject: [southbendlathe] Early 415 Workshop lathe |
>---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|




Hi all

Just thought I would share with you what I seen last night. A
fellow who is not on the list emailed me with some photos of a lathe
he was. He was asking me to help identify just what he had. Well as
it turns out is a really rare bird. He has not given me the serial
number yet but I am going to say this is one of the earliest 415
workshop lathes seen. The odd thing is the head stock casting looks
just like your 405 but has a shifter. The saddle cross slide and
apron are in fact 405 items. The lathe is equipped with a standard
415 tail stock and has the 1 1/2 -8 spindle thread. The apron hand
wheel is from a 405 without the polished rim but the tail stock hand
wheel is polished and is of the standard pattern.

This person has had the lathe for a number of years but knows
nothing about them and has never used it. It was given to him many
years ago by the original purchaser of the lathe for helping with
the old fellows yard work. The old boy passed away shortly after the
lathe was given to its new owner and has sit in his basement since
that time. This lathe is for sale and if anyone is interested let
me know and I can send you some pictures of it. Looks to be in
really good shape other than it has some surface rust on the cone
pulleys and the handles. The lathe has a three jaw chuck and what
looks to be most of the change gears. This lathe has the fixt type
countershaft with motor but does have the two step drive pulley were
I haved only seen the single step on these countershafts. I do not
see any damage ware or rust on the bed ways. Then in this time SB
was not putting the oil fluting on the bed ways as they did later.
These lathes only had the planer marks smoothed out and were
basically smooth with no scraper marks. This is true of my 420
toolmakers lathe and also my 405 and my two very early 415.

The lathe is located in Springfield MA.

Turk







--
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Early 415 Workshop lathe

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi all

Just thought I would share with you what I seen last night. A
fellow who is not on the list emailed me with some photos of a lathe
he was. He was asking me to help identify just what he had. Well as
it turns out is a really rare bird. He has not given me the serial
number yet but I am going to say this is one of the earliest 415
workshop lathes seen. The odd thing is the head stock casting looks
just like your 405 but has a shifter. The saddle cross slide and
apron are in fact 405 items. The lathe is equipped with a standard
415 tail stock and has the 1 1/2 -8 spindle thread. The apron hand
wheel is from a 405 without the polished rim but the tail stock hand
wheel is polished and is of the standard pattern.

This person has had the lathe for a number of years but knows
nothing about them and has never used it. It was given to him many
years ago by the original purchaser of the lathe for helping with
the old fellows yard work. The old boy passed away shortly after the
lathe was given to its new owner and has sit in his basement since
that time. This lathe is for sale and if anyone is interested let
me know and I can send you some pictures of it. Looks to be in
really good shape other than it has some surface rust on the cone
pulleys and the handles. The lathe has a three jaw chuck and what
looks to be most of the change gears. This lathe has the fixt type
countershaft with motor but does have the two step drive pulley were
I haved only seen the single step on these countershafts. I do not
see any damage ware or rust on the bed ways. Then in this time SB
was not putting the oil fluting on the bed ways as they did later.
These lathes only had the planer marks smoothed out and were
basically smooth with no scraper marks. This is true of my 420
toolmakers lathe and also my 405 and my two very early 415.

The lathe is located in Springfield MA.

Turk


Re: Water Soluable Oil

RichD <cmsteam@...>
 

A sample "I have been using for a year or so"
I'm guessing your not flood or mist applying it. Correct?
Unless you use this machine in a daily production basis,
sol oil can be a problem. Some brands are horrible.
I don't use it at home. It's bad enough at work, but them
the machines are made for it. Some machinists use squirt bottles
on the manual machines and sure enough, they are stained and grungy.
I use plain old brown cutting oil.
Always wipe down daily.
RichD

ajwesleyj wrote:


I am new a new kid when it comes to metal lathe work. A CNC machinist
suggested that I use water soluable oil with my heavy ten. He gave me
a sample which I have been using for a year or so. It seemes to work
well but then again I do not know a great deal about how it should
work. Two thing I have seen: 1) if I do not wipe the lathe down after
use it developes a tacky flim and 2) a stain will form on the bed
where the felt touches it.

Now that it is time to get some more oil I have been think is this
what I should be using? What if it gets into the bearing?

I have been reading this site long enough to know that there are
opinions out there about everything so please share them.


Re: Gear Cover

fl.lusen
 

Dave,

Guess what? There is no link to create a new album there either.

What gives?

Fred


Re: Gear Cover

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Fred

OK your gear cover door pin is held in with Babbitt pored on
assembly using a centering fixture in the spindle.

If you pin is not to lose you can make up a drive sleeve that fits
over the pin and then drive the Babbitt back down around the knurls
of the pin. The hole in the casting is as cast and this is another
one of SB way of making something fit close without doing any
machines work.

Fred I melt the Babbitt out of the casting and I have made a
centering bushing for the spindle. This with the use of some blocks
and clamps I hold the door in its correct position and then re-poor
the Babbitt. I actually use linotype lead in mine as it is harder
than the Babbitt SB used.

Turk.

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Lusen" <fl.lusen@...>
wrote:

I have been off of the list for some time now but am finally
starting a
complete restoration of my 9A.

Has anyone removed the hinge pin from the gear cover? Mine is
wabbling
around so the cover does not close well without having to lift it
up.
Since there is nothing holding it in from the outside, I am
assuming
the cap on top is the only holding and centering device. From
what I
can see, the pin either needs to be driven out or the cap needs to
be
ground away.

I have some photos but when I went to the photos page, the links,
Create New Album and Add Photos, are not present. The photos
section
is not full either.

Regards,

Fred


Water Soluable Oil

ajwesleyj
 

I am new a new kid when it comes to metal lathe work. A CNC machinist
suggested that I use water soluable oil with my heavy ten. He gave me
a sample which I have been using for a year or so. It seemes to work
well but then again I do not know a great deal about how it should
work. Two thing I have seen: 1) if I do not wipe the lathe down after
use it developes a tacky flim and 2) a stain will form on the bed
where the felt touches it.

Now that it is time to get some more oil I have been think is this
what I should be using? What if it gets into the bearing?

I have been reading this site long enough to know that there are
opinions out there about everything so please share them.


Re: Gear Cover

David Smith <homessearch@...>
 


--- In southbendlathe@..., "Fred Lusen" wrote:
>
> I have been off of the list for some time now but am finally starting a
> complete restoration of my 9A.
>
> Has anyone removed the hinge pin from the gear cover? Mine is wabbling
> around so the cover does not close well without having to lift it up.
> Since there is nothing holding it in from the outside, I am assuming
> the cap on top is the only holding and centering device. From what I
> can see, the pin either needs to be driven out or the cap needs to be
> ground away.
>
> I have some photos but when I went to the photos page, the links,
> Create New Album and Add Photos, are not present. The photos section
> is not full either.
>
> Regards,
>
> Fred
>


Gear Cover

fl.lusen
 

I have been off of the list for some time now but am finally starting a
complete restoration of my 9A.

Has anyone removed the hinge pin from the gear cover? Mine is wabbling
around so the cover does not close well without having to lift it up.
Since there is nothing holding it in from the outside, I am assuming
the cap on top is the only holding and centering device. From what I
can see, the pin either needs to be driven out or the cap needs to be
ground away.

I have some photos but when I went to the photos page, the links,
Create New Album and Add Photos, are not present. The photos section
is not full either.

Regards,

Fred


Re: Bearing removal? now powder coating

bdmail <bdmail@...>
 

Wow, very informative and interesting Dennis,


Thanks



Bernie


Courage does not always roar.
Sometimes courage is the quiet voice
At the end of the day saying,
"I will try again tomorrow."
---unknown author

Just a note here if your lathe was built around 1932 or earlier and
it was originally black in color these lathes were not painted in
the sense that we think of paint today. All black SB lathes and all
other black machines prior to 1930 were coated with Japanning. This
was not really paint and was more like today's powder coat. I have
restored many old machines with this coating on it and let me tell
you it is hard to replicate in any kind of today's paints.
Japanning was two parts boiled linseed oil two parts pure gum
turpentine and one part asphaltum or natural asphalt. The asfaltum
gave the mix its color and also was filler. Some times a little tree
rosin was added as a hardener. This stuff was a nasty smelling
thick goop that was applied to each part individually. After the
parts had air cured for a day or two they then went through a baking
process similar to powdered coatings. There were three or four
cycles of progressively hotter temperatures with the last one being
in the 350 to 400 degree range. Sometimes there was a little finish
work using fine pumas powder in between heating cycles. Japanning
is very thick as I have found it to be in the 1/32 to 3/32 inch
thickness range and this is very hard to do with paint of any kind.
...............

Turk


--------------------------------------------~->


not much info on a 15 1/4 lathe

carminebonacci <carminebonacci@...>
 

It seems that a 15 1/4 lathe is a rare beast I would like to get
better info on operation, history, parts and accessories
Thanks Carmine


Re: Powder coating on the back porch?

Bill Rogers
 

Mike,
To answer some of your questions here are my thougts.

1. powder coating is a very good way to protect your lathe. I've
just started rebuilding a lathe I purchased a few weeks ago and have
been very happy with the results of powder coating on the parts I've
done so far. Some folks will tell you you have to grind / fill
parts to get a good finish. Well maybe so if you plan on showing
the lathe a Pebble Beach - but not to provide a good protective
finish.
2. I use DuPont powders. They will sell them to an individual
directly and are very reasonable - between $4 and $6 per pound for
standard colors and if they have a box open anywhere in the US
(normally they sell it by the 25 lb box, but I've found every color
I've wanted already open at one of there depots. Just call them at
800-247-3886 and they will send you a package of their colors and
prices.
3. I was very uncertain about using a "cheap" powder gun, but a
friend of mine on the west coast send me some items he did at home
that looked very good. I asked him what system he used and he said
the one from Harbor Freight. So I purchased one also. I'm sure the
more expensive guns do a better job of applying the powder and waste
less powder in the process, but with the low cost of the powder - I
think the cheap gun is the way to go for the home user.
3. The biggest issue is that you need an over that is outside -
don't try to bake the part in your house - it puts off a terible
oder and the fumes are harmful to your health. I have seen the heat
lamp type of heaters, but never used one - so I can't comment.
4. you will need to clean the parts very well prior to powder
coating. You should also bake the parts a few time to get all the
oil out of the parts - then clean with solvernt again - the powder
coat.
5. they sell a special fiberglass tape for oven use. I've found
that normal masking tape will work fine if you don't exceed 375 degs
or bake for much more than 20 minutes. That is as high as i've need
to bake and as long as they call for in the DuPont instructions.
The tape may last longer and go higher - I haven't tried.
6. email me off line and i'll send you some pictures of the parts
I've done so far - roge1033@bellsouth.net

Bill R.

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "mcwirth67" <mwirth@...>
wrote:

New guy here (see my other posting today) with a SB 10K.

Don't have much space, just a corner in the garage. Certainly
don't have a large oven in
which to bake powder coating on large parts of the lathe (at
least, not without ending my
marriage of thirty-some years :-) So is powder coating a
reasonable way to repaint lathe
parts or objects I make on it?

1. Good sources for powder? What's the right, "authentic" color?
Just a battleship gray?

2. Do small coating guns (e.g., Sears or Harbor Freight units)
work?

3. Any alternatives to an oven for baking on paint? Or do I need
an oven anyway to bake
the oil out of old parts?

4. How do I mask areas (e.g., the ways)? Masking tape? Or will
it bake on and become
hard to remove?

5. Any pics of successful paint jobs?

TIA,

Mike Wirth
Palo Alto, CA

PS: The local Costco has shopping carts that have been
reconditioned and powder coated
(speckly gray). If powder coating can take that abuse, it can
handle anything! (Hmm...
maybe I can strap my 10K to a shopping cart and have it run
through the same process :-)


lathe

random_male_man <random_male_man@...>
 

do any of you know how to get of kidscues he has a lathe i am intrested
in
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