Date   

Re: Gear Cover

fl.lusen
 

Dave,

Guess what? There is no link to create a new album there either.

What gives?

Fred


Re: Gear Cover

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Fred

OK your gear cover door pin is held in with Babbitt pored on
assembly using a centering fixture in the spindle.

If you pin is not to lose you can make up a drive sleeve that fits
over the pin and then drive the Babbitt back down around the knurls
of the pin. The hole in the casting is as cast and this is another
one of SB way of making something fit close without doing any
machines work.

Fred I melt the Babbitt out of the casting and I have made a
centering bushing for the spindle. This with the use of some blocks
and clamps I hold the door in its correct position and then re-poor
the Babbitt. I actually use linotype lead in mine as it is harder
than the Babbitt SB used.

Turk.

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Fred Lusen" <fl.lusen@...>
wrote:

I have been off of the list for some time now but am finally
starting a
complete restoration of my 9A.

Has anyone removed the hinge pin from the gear cover? Mine is
wabbling
around so the cover does not close well without having to lift it
up.
Since there is nothing holding it in from the outside, I am
assuming
the cap on top is the only holding and centering device. From
what I
can see, the pin either needs to be driven out or the cap needs to
be
ground away.

I have some photos but when I went to the photos page, the links,
Create New Album and Add Photos, are not present. The photos
section
is not full either.

Regards,

Fred


Water Soluable Oil

ajwesleyj
 

I am new a new kid when it comes to metal lathe work. A CNC machinist
suggested that I use water soluable oil with my heavy ten. He gave me
a sample which I have been using for a year or so. It seemes to work
well but then again I do not know a great deal about how it should
work. Two thing I have seen: 1) if I do not wipe the lathe down after
use it developes a tacky flim and 2) a stain will form on the bed
where the felt touches it.

Now that it is time to get some more oil I have been think is this
what I should be using? What if it gets into the bearing?

I have been reading this site long enough to know that there are
opinions out there about everything so please share them.


Re: Gear Cover

David Smith <homessearch@...>
 


--- In southbendlathe@..., "Fred Lusen" wrote:
>
> I have been off of the list for some time now but am finally starting a
> complete restoration of my 9A.
>
> Has anyone removed the hinge pin from the gear cover? Mine is wabbling
> around so the cover does not close well without having to lift it up.
> Since there is nothing holding it in from the outside, I am assuming
> the cap on top is the only holding and centering device. From what I
> can see, the pin either needs to be driven out or the cap needs to be
> ground away.
>
> I have some photos but when I went to the photos page, the links,
> Create New Album and Add Photos, are not present. The photos section
> is not full either.
>
> Regards,
>
> Fred
>


Gear Cover

fl.lusen
 

I have been off of the list for some time now but am finally starting a
complete restoration of my 9A.

Has anyone removed the hinge pin from the gear cover? Mine is wabbling
around so the cover does not close well without having to lift it up.
Since there is nothing holding it in from the outside, I am assuming
the cap on top is the only holding and centering device. From what I
can see, the pin either needs to be driven out or the cap needs to be
ground away.

I have some photos but when I went to the photos page, the links,
Create New Album and Add Photos, are not present. The photos section
is not full either.

Regards,

Fred


Re: Bearing removal? now powder coating

bdmail <bdmail@...>
 

Wow, very informative and interesting Dennis,


Thanks



Bernie


Courage does not always roar.
Sometimes courage is the quiet voice
At the end of the day saying,
"I will try again tomorrow."
---unknown author

Just a note here if your lathe was built around 1932 or earlier and
it was originally black in color these lathes were not painted in
the sense that we think of paint today. All black SB lathes and all
other black machines prior to 1930 were coated with Japanning. This
was not really paint and was more like today's powder coat. I have
restored many old machines with this coating on it and let me tell
you it is hard to replicate in any kind of today's paints.
Japanning was two parts boiled linseed oil two parts pure gum
turpentine and one part asphaltum or natural asphalt. The asfaltum
gave the mix its color and also was filler. Some times a little tree
rosin was added as a hardener. This stuff was a nasty smelling
thick goop that was applied to each part individually. After the
parts had air cured for a day or two they then went through a baking
process similar to powdered coatings. There were three or four
cycles of progressively hotter temperatures with the last one being
in the 350 to 400 degree range. Sometimes there was a little finish
work using fine pumas powder in between heating cycles. Japanning
is very thick as I have found it to be in the 1/32 to 3/32 inch
thickness range and this is very hard to do with paint of any kind.
...............

Turk


--------------------------------------------~->


not much info on a 15 1/4 lathe

carminebonacci <carminebonacci@...>
 

It seems that a 15 1/4 lathe is a rare beast I would like to get
better info on operation, history, parts and accessories
Thanks Carmine


Re: Powder coating on the back porch?

Bill Rogers
 

Mike,
To answer some of your questions here are my thougts.

1. powder coating is a very good way to protect your lathe. I've
just started rebuilding a lathe I purchased a few weeks ago and have
been very happy with the results of powder coating on the parts I've
done so far. Some folks will tell you you have to grind / fill
parts to get a good finish. Well maybe so if you plan on showing
the lathe a Pebble Beach - but not to provide a good protective
finish.
2. I use DuPont powders. They will sell them to an individual
directly and are very reasonable - between $4 and $6 per pound for
standard colors and if they have a box open anywhere in the US
(normally they sell it by the 25 lb box, but I've found every color
I've wanted already open at one of there depots. Just call them at
800-247-3886 and they will send you a package of their colors and
prices.
3. I was very uncertain about using a "cheap" powder gun, but a
friend of mine on the west coast send me some items he did at home
that looked very good. I asked him what system he used and he said
the one from Harbor Freight. So I purchased one also. I'm sure the
more expensive guns do a better job of applying the powder and waste
less powder in the process, but with the low cost of the powder - I
think the cheap gun is the way to go for the home user.
3. The biggest issue is that you need an over that is outside -
don't try to bake the part in your house - it puts off a terible
oder and the fumes are harmful to your health. I have seen the heat
lamp type of heaters, but never used one - so I can't comment.
4. you will need to clean the parts very well prior to powder
coating. You should also bake the parts a few time to get all the
oil out of the parts - then clean with solvernt again - the powder
coat.
5. they sell a special fiberglass tape for oven use. I've found
that normal masking tape will work fine if you don't exceed 375 degs
or bake for much more than 20 minutes. That is as high as i've need
to bake and as long as they call for in the DuPont instructions.
The tape may last longer and go higher - I haven't tried.
6. email me off line and i'll send you some pictures of the parts
I've done so far - roge1033@bellsouth.net

Bill R.

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "mcwirth67" <mwirth@...>
wrote:

New guy here (see my other posting today) with a SB 10K.

Don't have much space, just a corner in the garage. Certainly
don't have a large oven in
which to bake powder coating on large parts of the lathe (at
least, not without ending my
marriage of thirty-some years :-) So is powder coating a
reasonable way to repaint lathe
parts or objects I make on it?

1. Good sources for powder? What's the right, "authentic" color?
Just a battleship gray?

2. Do small coating guns (e.g., Sears or Harbor Freight units)
work?

3. Any alternatives to an oven for baking on paint? Or do I need
an oven anyway to bake
the oil out of old parts?

4. How do I mask areas (e.g., the ways)? Masking tape? Or will
it bake on and become
hard to remove?

5. Any pics of successful paint jobs?

TIA,

Mike Wirth
Palo Alto, CA

PS: The local Costco has shopping carts that have been
reconditioned and powder coated
(speckly gray). If powder coating can take that abuse, it can
handle anything! (Hmm...
maybe I can strap my 10K to a shopping cart and have it run
through the same process :-)


lathe

random_male_man <random_male_man@...>
 

do any of you know how to get of kidscues he has a lathe i am intrested
in
Reg


Re: Carbide counterbore

Gary Mason <carncrows2004@...>
 

Hi Neal,
If the gear is "case hardened"? and it sounds like it is, as you've managed to drill through the case hardening and into the gear with a carbide drill bit. Could you c/b for the screw head diameter plus clearance using another carbide drill, then put a shoulder at the base of the c/b using a hss drill bit ground flat with appropriate back rake to square off at the base.The steel should be reletively easy to drill below the c/h with slow rpm and good cutting oil.
Regards,
Gary.

nwinblad@... wrote:
Does anyone know where I can buy a carbide step drill or counterbore for 4-40 pan head screws. I need to put some screws into a hardened steel gear. I can't seem to find a carbide step drill anywhere. I tried drilling through this stuff with a cobalt drill and it wouldn't touch it. Then I chucked up a carbide drill and it goes through it nicely. Now I just need to find a supplier...
 
Neal


Be a chatter box. Enjoy free PC-to-PC calls with Yahoo! Messenger with Voice.


South Bend "clone"

sandbsabel <clive.wood@...>
 

Hi, I have just acquired a Smart & Brown lathe that I believe is a
clone of the 9inch South Bend.
Is there anyone out there who can provide any tips on restoration - in
particular, what is the best way to deal with bed wear?
I am on the lookout for a screwcutting gearbox as the lathe is a model
S (no gearbox or power cross-slide).
I am very impressed with the build quality which appears to be as good
South Bend.
Clive


Powder coating on the back porch?

Michael Wirth
 

New guy here (see my other posting today) with a SB 10K.

Don't have much space, just a corner in the garage. Certainly don't have a large oven in
which to bake powder coating on large parts of the lathe (at least, not without ending my
marriage of thirty-some years :-) So is powder coating a reasonable way to repaint lathe
parts or objects I make on it?

1. Good sources for powder? What's the right, "authentic" color? Just a battleship gray?

2. Do small coating guns (e.g., Sears or Harbor Freight units) work?

3. Any alternatives to an oven for baking on paint? Or do I need an oven anyway to bake
the oil out of old parts?

4. How do I mask areas (e.g., the ways)? Masking tape? Or will it bake on and become
hard to remove?

5. Any pics of successful paint jobs?

TIA,

Mike Wirth
Palo Alto, CA

PS: The local Costco has shopping carts that have been reconditioned and powder coated
(speckly gray). If powder coating can take that abuse, it can handle anything! (Hmm...
maybe I can strap my 10K to a shopping cart and have it run through the same process :-)


New guy with a 1958-vintage SB 10K, with questions

Michael Wirth
 

Hi folks,

I'm a new guy here who is now the proud owner of a SB 10K (Model CL 670Z, 3 1/2" bed),
bought last Thursday (don't even have it home yet, nor have I cleared enough space in the
garage for it :-) Looks to be in nice condition, but certainly will need some work.

Naturally, I have some questions:

1. Got the Army "manual" (more like a parts list). Very useful. Thanks. Is there an
operation manual anywhere? Something related to this model, i.e., not the standard "How
to Operate a Lathe" book.

2. Is there a calibration/testing procedure anywhere, i.e., to produce the factory
calibration card that often comes with new lathes, showing runout, parallelism, etc?

3. Is there a disassembly/reassembly guide anywhere?

4. The Army manual shows a lubrication chart and (presumably obsolete)
recommendations on lubricants. Is there a chart of currently obtainable, best
recommendations for lubes? (something other than a long discussion thread, with lots of
differing personal opinions :-) For example, what's a good source for Teflon-loaded
grease for the spindle and backshaft?

Enough questions for this message.

Mike Wirth
Palo Alto, CA


heavy 10 compound dont need it for sale

crocahoggel <garyheinitz@...>
 

hi guys I have a heavy 10 compound that i bought from e bay. they
are over $1000 new i paid 154+ shipping for it i would like 150 for
it . i thought it might fit my 11inch but i was wrong so someone
missing a compound? guess what i have it.


Re: Carbide counterbore

Dave Mucha
 

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, nwinblad@... wrote:

Does anyone know where I can buy a carbide step drill or counterbore
for 4-40 pan head screws. I need to put some screws into a hardened
steel gear. I can't seem to find a carbide step drill anywhere. I
tried drilling through this stuff with a cobalt drill and it wouldn't
touch it. Then I chucked up a carbide drill and it goes through it
nicely. Now I just need to find a supplier...

Neal
What i do on holes that are deep enough is to drill the hole with a
regular drill, then once the hole is there with walls, finish the
bottom with an endmill.

Sometimes it works great, sometimes it don't. last set was of 8 holes
and half would up with chatter on the side walls. but the hole was
over an inch deep.

I find that if I clamp the part, drill, then switch to the end mill ,
it does a good job. when I drill all the holes first, then go back is
when I have problems.

Dave




Dave


Re: Update: Multi Start Thds

gorvil
 

Fountain pen caps and barrels use triple lead threads. With 1 and a
half turns you get 4 and a half threads engaged.

Glen Reeser


--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Steven Brown <sbrown04@...>
wrote:

Some Jorgensen light weight bar clamps.
Steve
On May 30, 2006, at 7:00 AM, pupdieselluv wrote:

Breech block on an artillery piece...
Eric
--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, RichD <cmsteam@> wrote:
>
> Mike,
> think leadscrew.
> Used in automatic machines for fast positioning.  CNC,
printers,
etc.
> RichD
>
> Mike wrote:
> >
> > I understand from your messages WHAT a multi start thread
is but
when
> > would you use one? I've never heard of it before.
> >
> > Mike.
>







--
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Re: cleaning ways on newly acquired 13

ALAN WHEATLEY
 

Eric
 
Sounds like you have a gem, it may be a little worn after all its years of use and neglect, but it's probably more accurate than you will be until you learned methods that suit you and have accumulated experience of finding ways to work around any points of wear.
 
I used my Heavy 10 for some years with much more wear than your lathe. The lathe was much better and more accurate after the bed had been planed to restore correct surfaces on the ways -- but my work didn't get much better until I had slowly learned enough to exploit the new accuracy !
 
Though its certainly unsightly and objectionable, surface rust isn't a problem. Scrub the rusted surface with non-abrasive Scotch-bright scouring pads, and wash with petrol, alcohol, penetrating oil, or whatever you prefer. You'll be left with clean metal, and a good working surface. Sure, it will be pitted with small "holes", but these won't affect the accuracy of the surface until the holes are big enough to merge. Until that happens, the holes will simply hold a little extra oil to lubricate the working surfaces. If the holes are fairly big, they also hold dirt and tiny chips, so you will have a little extra cleaning job to do when the machine is wiped clean after use.
 
For a few years, be thankful, use your lathe to the best of your ability, and enjoy using it. You will learn more as time goes by, and when the day comes when you really need to have more accuracy, think about refurbishing or replacing your machine.
 
And try to figure just how many members of the group are jealous that their lathe isn't in the condition that your is in !
 
Alan
 

hardtoguess03 wrote:

Hello,

I have been reading with great interest the FAQ, and a number of
articles regarding "restoring" older lathes.  This is because
yesterday, I brought home a newly acquired 13 inch SB.

I have done my best to examine this lathe for wear and overall
condition and have concluded that most of it is in very good shape
for its age.  There is one area, however that I am confused about --
the ways.


Re: Update: Multi Start Thds

Steven Brown <sbrown04@...>
 

Some Jorgensen light weight bar clamps.
Steve

On May 30, 2006, at 7:00 AM, pupdieselluv wrote:

Breech block on an artillery piece...
Eric
--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, RichD <cmsteam@...> wrote:
>
> Mike,
> think leadscrew.
> Used in automatic machines for fast positioning.  CNC, printers,
etc.
> RichD
>
> Mike wrote:
> >
> > I understand from your messages WHAT a multi start thread is but
when
> > would you use one? I've never heard of it before.
> >
> > Mike.
>







--
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Re: Update: Multi Start Thds

hoffmeyer <hmshop@hotmail.com>
 

Breech block on an artillery piece...
Eric
--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, RichD <cmsteam@...> wrote:

Mike,
think leadscrew.
Used in automatic machines for fast positioning. CNC, printers, etc.
RichD

Mike wrote:

I understand from your messages WHAT a multi start thread is but
when
would you use one? I've never heard of it before.

Mike.


Re: Carbide counterbore

RichD <cmsteam@...>
 

Neal,
any chance you could center a 1/4" carbide endmill over it in a mill?
MSC might have c'bores.
RichD

Does anyone know where I can buy a carbide step drill or counterbore for 4-40 pan head screws. I need to put some screws into a hardened steel gear. I
can't seem to find a carbide step drill anywhere. I tried drilling through this stuff
with a cobalt drill and it wouldn't touch it. Then I chucked up a carbide drill and
it goes through it nicely. Now I just need to find a supplier...

Neal

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