Date   

Re: Carbide counterbore

Gary Mason <carncrows2004@...>
 

Hi Neal,
If the gear is "case hardened"? and it sounds like it is, as you've managed to drill through the case hardening and into the gear with a carbide drill bit. Could you c/b for the screw head diameter plus clearance using another carbide drill, then put a shoulder at the base of the c/b using a hss drill bit ground flat with appropriate back rake to square off at the base.The steel should be reletively easy to drill below the c/h with slow rpm and good cutting oil.
Regards,
Gary.

nwinblad@... wrote:
Does anyone know where I can buy a carbide step drill or counterbore for 4-40 pan head screws. I need to put some screws into a hardened steel gear. I can't seem to find a carbide step drill anywhere. I tried drilling through this stuff with a cobalt drill and it wouldn't touch it. Then I chucked up a carbide drill and it goes through it nicely. Now I just need to find a supplier...
 
Neal


Be a chatter box. Enjoy free PC-to-PC calls with Yahoo! Messenger with Voice.


South Bend "clone"

sandbsabel <clive.wood@...>
 

Hi, I have just acquired a Smart & Brown lathe that I believe is a
clone of the 9inch South Bend.
Is there anyone out there who can provide any tips on restoration - in
particular, what is the best way to deal with bed wear?
I am on the lookout for a screwcutting gearbox as the lathe is a model
S (no gearbox or power cross-slide).
I am very impressed with the build quality which appears to be as good
South Bend.
Clive


Powder coating on the back porch?

Michael Wirth
 

New guy here (see my other posting today) with a SB 10K.

Don't have much space, just a corner in the garage. Certainly don't have a large oven in
which to bake powder coating on large parts of the lathe (at least, not without ending my
marriage of thirty-some years :-) So is powder coating a reasonable way to repaint lathe
parts or objects I make on it?

1. Good sources for powder? What's the right, "authentic" color? Just a battleship gray?

2. Do small coating guns (e.g., Sears or Harbor Freight units) work?

3. Any alternatives to an oven for baking on paint? Or do I need an oven anyway to bake
the oil out of old parts?

4. How do I mask areas (e.g., the ways)? Masking tape? Or will it bake on and become
hard to remove?

5. Any pics of successful paint jobs?

TIA,

Mike Wirth
Palo Alto, CA

PS: The local Costco has shopping carts that have been reconditioned and powder coated
(speckly gray). If powder coating can take that abuse, it can handle anything! (Hmm...
maybe I can strap my 10K to a shopping cart and have it run through the same process :-)


New guy with a 1958-vintage SB 10K, with questions

Michael Wirth
 

Hi folks,

I'm a new guy here who is now the proud owner of a SB 10K (Model CL 670Z, 3 1/2" bed),
bought last Thursday (don't even have it home yet, nor have I cleared enough space in the
garage for it :-) Looks to be in nice condition, but certainly will need some work.

Naturally, I have some questions:

1. Got the Army "manual" (more like a parts list). Very useful. Thanks. Is there an
operation manual anywhere? Something related to this model, i.e., not the standard "How
to Operate a Lathe" book.

2. Is there a calibration/testing procedure anywhere, i.e., to produce the factory
calibration card that often comes with new lathes, showing runout, parallelism, etc?

3. Is there a disassembly/reassembly guide anywhere?

4. The Army manual shows a lubrication chart and (presumably obsolete)
recommendations on lubricants. Is there a chart of currently obtainable, best
recommendations for lubes? (something other than a long discussion thread, with lots of
differing personal opinions :-) For example, what's a good source for Teflon-loaded
grease for the spindle and backshaft?

Enough questions for this message.

Mike Wirth
Palo Alto, CA


heavy 10 compound dont need it for sale

crocahoggel <garyheinitz@...>
 

hi guys I have a heavy 10 compound that i bought from e bay. they
are over $1000 new i paid 154+ shipping for it i would like 150 for
it . i thought it might fit my 11inch but i was wrong so someone
missing a compound? guess what i have it.


Re: Carbide counterbore

Dave Mucha
 

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, nwinblad@... wrote:

Does anyone know where I can buy a carbide step drill or counterbore
for 4-40 pan head screws. I need to put some screws into a hardened
steel gear. I can't seem to find a carbide step drill anywhere. I
tried drilling through this stuff with a cobalt drill and it wouldn't
touch it. Then I chucked up a carbide drill and it goes through it
nicely. Now I just need to find a supplier...

Neal
What i do on holes that are deep enough is to drill the hole with a
regular drill, then once the hole is there with walls, finish the
bottom with an endmill.

Sometimes it works great, sometimes it don't. last set was of 8 holes
and half would up with chatter on the side walls. but the hole was
over an inch deep.

I find that if I clamp the part, drill, then switch to the end mill ,
it does a good job. when I drill all the holes first, then go back is
when I have problems.

Dave




Dave


Re: Update: Multi Start Thds

gorvil
 

Fountain pen caps and barrels use triple lead threads. With 1 and a
half turns you get 4 and a half threads engaged.

Glen Reeser


--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Steven Brown <sbrown04@...>
wrote:

Some Jorgensen light weight bar clamps.
Steve
On May 30, 2006, at 7:00 AM, pupdieselluv wrote:

Breech block on an artillery piece...
Eric
--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, RichD <cmsteam@> wrote:
>
> Mike,
> think leadscrew.
> Used in automatic machines for fast positioning.  CNC,
printers,
etc.
> RichD
>
> Mike wrote:
> >
> > I understand from your messages WHAT a multi start thread
is but
when
> > would you use one? I've never heard of it before.
> >
> > Mike.
>







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Re: cleaning ways on newly acquired 13

ALAN WHEATLEY
 

Eric
 
Sounds like you have a gem, it may be a little worn after all its years of use and neglect, but it's probably more accurate than you will be until you learned methods that suit you and have accumulated experience of finding ways to work around any points of wear.
 
I used my Heavy 10 for some years with much more wear than your lathe. The lathe was much better and more accurate after the bed had been planed to restore correct surfaces on the ways -- but my work didn't get much better until I had slowly learned enough to exploit the new accuracy !
 
Though its certainly unsightly and objectionable, surface rust isn't a problem. Scrub the rusted surface with non-abrasive Scotch-bright scouring pads, and wash with petrol, alcohol, penetrating oil, or whatever you prefer. You'll be left with clean metal, and a good working surface. Sure, it will be pitted with small "holes", but these won't affect the accuracy of the surface until the holes are big enough to merge. Until that happens, the holes will simply hold a little extra oil to lubricate the working surfaces. If the holes are fairly big, they also hold dirt and tiny chips, so you will have a little extra cleaning job to do when the machine is wiped clean after use.
 
For a few years, be thankful, use your lathe to the best of your ability, and enjoy using it. You will learn more as time goes by, and when the day comes when you really need to have more accuracy, think about refurbishing or replacing your machine.
 
And try to figure just how many members of the group are jealous that their lathe isn't in the condition that your is in !
 
Alan
 

hardtoguess03 wrote:

Hello,

I have been reading with great interest the FAQ, and a number of
articles regarding "restoring" older lathes.  This is because
yesterday, I brought home a newly acquired 13 inch SB.

I have done my best to examine this lathe for wear and overall
condition and have concluded that most of it is in very good shape
for its age.  There is one area, however that I am confused about --
the ways.


Re: Update: Multi Start Thds

Steven Brown <sbrown04@...>
 

Some Jorgensen light weight bar clamps.
Steve

On May 30, 2006, at 7:00 AM, pupdieselluv wrote:

Breech block on an artillery piece...
Eric
--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, RichD <cmsteam@...> wrote:
>
> Mike,
> think leadscrew.
> Used in automatic machines for fast positioning.  CNC, printers,
etc.
> RichD
>
> Mike wrote:
> >
> > I understand from your messages WHAT a multi start thread is but
when
> > would you use one? I've never heard of it before.
> >
> > Mike.
>







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Re: Update: Multi Start Thds

hoffmeyer <hmshop@hotmail.com>
 

Breech block on an artillery piece...
Eric
--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, RichD <cmsteam@...> wrote:

Mike,
think leadscrew.
Used in automatic machines for fast positioning. CNC, printers, etc.
RichD

Mike wrote:

I understand from your messages WHAT a multi start thread is but
when
would you use one? I've never heard of it before.

Mike.


Re: Carbide counterbore

RichD <cmsteam@...>
 

Neal,
any chance you could center a 1/4" carbide endmill over it in a mill?
MSC might have c'bores.
RichD

Does anyone know where I can buy a carbide step drill or counterbore for 4-40 pan head screws. I need to put some screws into a hardened steel gear. I
can't seem to find a carbide step drill anywhere. I tried drilling through this stuff
with a cobalt drill and it wouldn't touch it. Then I chucked up a carbide drill and
it goes through it nicely. Now I just need to find a supplier...

Neal


Carbide counterbore

nwinblad
 

Does anyone know where I can buy a carbide step drill or counterbore for 4-40 pan head screws. I need to put some screws into a hardened steel gear. I can't seem to find a carbide step drill anywhere. I tried drilling through this stuff with a cobalt drill and it wouldn't touch it. Then I chucked up a carbide drill and it goes through it nicely. Now I just need to find a supplier...
 
Neal


Re: cleaning ways on newly acquired 13

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Eric

The mic as you call it must be the carriage stop or micrometer bed
stop. These are really very simple. You will have a thumb screw
that if you remove it you should be about to remove the dial ring.
Then the spindle just unthreads. This is one type of stop. The
other style has a cap on one end that has three screws. If you
remove these screws and the plate you can unscrew the stop. As you
take it out you will be about to remove the dial that sits in the
middle of the casting. Really either model are very simple items.

Have no fear your help is as close as your computer key board.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "hardtoguess03"
<hardtoguess03@...> wrote:

Well time will certainly tell. I have removed the majority of the
crud from the painted surfaces of the lathe -- uncovering an
original finish that is remarkably well intact. There are many
chips and gouges in it, but after researching more on this list
and
careful consideration regarding time effort and talent, I believe
I
am going to give the whole machine a good cleaning and a dose of
regular maintenance as I reassemble it, but I am not going to
paint
it.

I am waiting for my engine hoist to return (it's out on loan) so
that I can set the bed and finish assembling. I have cleaned the
bed, but have not yet removed the aforementioned corrosion from
the
ways. I'll do that once the bed is set and at a comfortable
working
height. I've examined all the gears, levers and other moving
parts
and they all work smoothly and exhibit no signs of excessive
corrosion.

My current area of concern is the small mic that goes near the
headstock - it's all gummed up and I'm a little chicken to take it
apart. Has anyone taken one of these apart and maybe can offer
some
advice?

The second thing is the topside of the saddle. It's a mess with
corrosion -- light stuff, but really uniformly covered. It too
looks like a daunting dissasembly job. I'm not married, so I'm
wondering if I should just take it upstairs and put it out on the
kitchen table to work on :)

Finally, I have been unable to find anything that resembles the
item
that actually holds a tool. I see the picture of it in the
catalog,
but I can't seem to find anything in my vast pile of stuff that
resembles it. I'll keep looking.

Unfortunately, I have a big work week coming up and will be unable
to find too much time to make significant progress.

Eric

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@> wrote:

I Eric

OK your assessment of the lead screw leads me to believe you
have
minimal ware on your lathe. The only thing that could cause a
problem is that dam tool post grinder. More than one lathe has
been wrecked by using one of them. Not so much of a problem if
proper precautions were taken. Mostly I have seen lathes using
tool
post grinders were no precautions were taken and they just let
the
grinding dust settle on the ways. Bad bad bad. The grinding
wheel
grit gets under the saddle and imbeds in the soft cast iron and
then
just starts to ware your bed down. It does not sound like this
is
the case with your lathe.

Your history tells me that you probably have found a diamond in
the
rough. To say it has suffered from more years of neglect than
in
use or abuse. Most people that spend there own hard earned
money
on
a tool tend to take better care of that tool than one that
belongs
to a deferent person or company. Trust me I own a company and
I
can guarantee people who do not own the tool will not take care
of
what they use. Union shops are the worst. The original owner
more
than likely came through the depression and most of these people
have a much different view than people who did not. This may
also
be
a person the worked in a defense plant during the war and
learned
his skills there. Again these kinds of people took care of what
they used.

I have a 1919 Dalton peddle powered lathe that was purchased by
a
veteran returning from France. The lathe was purchased with his
muster out pay and he kept the lathe in a closet off the living
room
and took it out in the winter time and played with it. One of
my
greatest finds. The lathe came from South Dakota.


Good luck with your new toy.

Turk



<hardtoguess03@> wrote:

Hi,

Many thanks for this posting. I just spent some time with the
mic
and the lead screw and here's what I found:

diameter of screw before the threads start (the smooth
part): .999

The largest diameter I was able to observe on the threads of
the
leadscrew was .998. I observed it in several areas -- mostly
towards the tailstock end of the screw.

Near the area of greatest wear on the bed, I measure the screw
in
the same areas and observed .995 as a low and tapering up from
there.

So the max variation in the threaded portion of the leadscrew
appears to be .003.

I unscientifically measure the whole screw and overall
observed
a
taper from the most worn area of the bed (.995) to the tail of
the
screw (.998).

Any comments would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Eric


Re: cleaning ways on newly acquired 13

hardtoguess03 <hardtoguess03@...>
 

Well time will certainly tell. I have removed the majority of the
crud from the painted surfaces of the lathe -- uncovering an
original finish that is remarkably well intact. There are many
chips and gouges in it, but after researching more on this list and
careful consideration regarding time effort and talent, I believe I
am going to give the whole machine a good cleaning and a dose of
regular maintenance as I reassemble it, but I am not going to paint
it.

I am waiting for my engine hoist to return (it's out on loan) so
that I can set the bed and finish assembling. I have cleaned the
bed, but have not yet removed the aforementioned corrosion from the
ways. I'll do that once the bed is set and at a comfortable working
height. I've examined all the gears, levers and other moving parts
and they all work smoothly and exhibit no signs of excessive
corrosion.

My current area of concern is the small mic that goes near the
headstock - it's all gummed up and I'm a little chicken to take it
apart. Has anyone taken one of these apart and maybe can offer some
advice?

The second thing is the topside of the saddle. It's a mess with
corrosion -- light stuff, but really uniformly covered. It too
looks like a daunting dissasembly job. I'm not married, so I'm
wondering if I should just take it upstairs and put it out on the
kitchen table to work on :)

Finally, I have been unable to find anything that resembles the item
that actually holds a tool. I see the picture of it in the catalog,
but I can't seem to find anything in my vast pile of stuff that
resembles it. I'll keep looking.

Unfortunately, I have a big work week coming up and will be unable
to find too much time to make significant progress.

Eric

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@...> wrote:

I Eric

OK your assessment of the lead screw leads me to believe you have
minimal ware on your lathe. The only thing that could cause a
problem is that dam tool post grinder. More than one lathe has
been wrecked by using one of them. Not so much of a problem if
proper precautions were taken. Mostly I have seen lathes using
tool
post grinders were no precautions were taken and they just let the
grinding dust settle on the ways. Bad bad bad. The grinding
wheel
grit gets under the saddle and imbeds in the soft cast iron and
then
just starts to ware your bed down. It does not sound like this is
the case with your lathe.

Your history tells me that you probably have found a diamond in
the
rough. To say it has suffered from more years of neglect than in
use or abuse. Most people that spend there own hard earned money
on
a tool tend to take better care of that tool than one that belongs
to a deferent person or company. Trust me I own a company and I
can guarantee people who do not own the tool will not take care of
what they use. Union shops are the worst. The original owner more
than likely came through the depression and most of these people
have a much different view than people who did not. This may also
be
a person the worked in a defense plant during the war and learned
his skills there. Again these kinds of people took care of what
they used.

I have a 1919 Dalton peddle powered lathe that was purchased by a
veteran returning from France. The lathe was purchased with his
muster out pay and he kept the lathe in a closet off the living
room
and took it out in the winter time and played with it. One of my
greatest finds. The lathe came from South Dakota.


Good luck with your new toy.

Turk



<hardtoguess03@> wrote:

Hi,

Many thanks for this posting. I just spent some time with the
mic
and the lead screw and here's what I found:

diameter of screw before the threads start (the smooth
part): .999

The largest diameter I was able to observe on the threads of the
leadscrew was .998. I observed it in several areas -- mostly
towards the tailstock end of the screw.

Near the area of greatest wear on the bed, I measure the screw
in
the same areas and observed .995 as a low and tapering up from
there.

So the max variation in the threaded portion of the leadscrew
appears to be .003.

I unscientifically measure the whole screw and overall observed
a
taper from the most worn area of the bed (.995) to the tail of
the
screw (.998).

Any comments would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Eric


Re: cleaning ways on newly acquired 13

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

I Eric

OK your assessment of the lead screw leads me to believe you have
minimal ware on your lathe. The only thing that could cause a
problem is that dam tool post grinder. More than one lathe has
been wrecked by using one of them. Not so much of a problem if
proper precautions were taken. Mostly I have seen lathes using tool
post grinders were no precautions were taken and they just let the
grinding dust settle on the ways. Bad bad bad. The grinding wheel
grit gets under the saddle and imbeds in the soft cast iron and then
just starts to ware your bed down. It does not sound like this is
the case with your lathe.

Your history tells me that you probably have found a diamond in the
rough. To say it has suffered from more years of neglect than in
use or abuse. Most people that spend there own hard earned money on
a tool tend to take better care of that tool than one that belongs
to a deferent person or company. Trust me I own a company and I
can guarantee people who do not own the tool will not take care of
what they use. Union shops are the worst. The original owner more
than likely came through the depression and most of these people
have a much different view than people who did not. This may also be
a person the worked in a defense plant during the war and learned
his skills there. Again these kinds of people took care of what
they used.

I have a 1919 Dalton peddle powered lathe that was purchased by a
veteran returning from France. The lathe was purchased with his
muster out pay and he kept the lathe in a closet off the living room
and took it out in the winter time and played with it. One of my
greatest finds. The lathe came from South Dakota.


Good luck with your new toy.

Turk



<hardtoguess03@...> wrote:

Hi,

Many thanks for this posting. I just spent some time with the mic
and the lead screw and here's what I found:

diameter of screw before the threads start (the smooth part): .999

The largest diameter I was able to observe on the threads of the
leadscrew was .998. I observed it in several areas -- mostly
towards the tailstock end of the screw.

Near the area of greatest wear on the bed, I measure the screw in
the same areas and observed .995 as a low and tapering up from
there.

So the max variation in the threaded portion of the leadscrew
appears to be .003.

I unscientifically measure the whole screw and overall observed a
taper from the most worn area of the bed (.995) to the tail of the
screw (.998).

Any comments would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Eric


Some history behind my "new" lathe

hardtoguess03 <hardtoguess03@...>
 

A little history about the lathe:

o Model: 13" Toolroom Precision Lathe #Gykab (60" model).

o Purchased in the mid forties by the former owner's grandpa

o Included Literature: SB Catalog #110D (1945) including grandpa's
notes on which lathe to buy. He seemed to be caught between the 13"
quick change ($909 + $170 for the motor and some chucks)., The 10"
precision toolroom lathe (again, 909.00 + 170.00), The 10" quick
change ($735.00 + $150.00 for motor & chucks) and the 10" toolroom
lathe ($785 + $150).. Ultimately he bought the 13" Toolroom.
Ironically, there are no notes to indicate how much he paid for it.

o Also included: Bulletins H1 - H4. Installation & Leveling,
Keeping Trim, Keeping Clean & Oiling.

o He worked in his home machine shop (in his attic!) every morning
from the day he retired to shortly before he passed on. It has sat
essentially unused since that time.

o Sale included: Tons of stuff! a Grinder attachment, 40 or 50
collets, around 20 lbs of bits, three or four chucks, face plates,
belts, A diamond horizontal milling machine and a bunch of bits for
that. Many other items I have yet to identify.

-Eric


Re: cleaning ways on newly acquired 13

hardtoguess03 <hardtoguess03@...>
 

Hi,

Many thanks for this posting. I just spent some time with the mic
and the lead screw and here's what I found:

diameter of screw before the threads start (the smooth part): .999

The largest diameter I was able to observe on the threads of the
leadscrew was .998. I observed it in several areas -- mostly
towards the tailstock end of the screw.

Near the area of greatest wear on the bed, I measure the screw in
the same areas and observed .995 as a low and tapering up from there.

So the max variation in the threaded portion of the leadscrew
appears to be .003.

I unscientifically measure the whole screw and overall observed a
taper from the most worn area of the bed (.995) to the tail of the
screw (.998).

Any comments would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Eric

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@...> wrote:

Hi Eric

OK as to your questions about the ware on the bed. There is
nothing
you can do about what you have unless you start from scratch and
re-
grind the bed and then use Turcite bonded under the saddle to
bring
it back up to the correct height. I have done many machines and
here is what you up against. First the bed is made of semi
steel.
This is a mix of 50 to 60% steel and 40 to 50% cast iron. The
saddle on the other hand is just cast iron. So what does this all
mean? Eric if you are showing .001 to 002 of ware in the sweet
spot
of the bed you will have four times that much ware under the
saddle. One way of checking to see just what damage has been done
is to take a mic and measure the diameter of the lead screw. If
the
saddle has settled down a lot there will be ware on the diameter
of
the lead screw in the same area as the bed. This is because there
is little clearance between the lead screw and the bushing on the
back of the apron that it passes through. I have seen lead screw
that had as much as .015 of diameter ware do to bad bed and saddle
ware. Check this first as this will give you an idea of the bed
saddle condition.

Now I will say that a little bed ware will not affect the accuracy
of the lathe to much as the bed and saddle have worn together and
should be seated well into each other. This is why you can't do
anything to the bed or saddle short of complete overhaul. The
nicks
and dings on the bed ways you can take a nice smooth fine honing
stone and dress the high spots down. These will not effect
function
only your pride in the machine. Light rust can be handled a
number
of ways. I use white or very fine scotch bright pads and Brasso
brass polish to clean up ways that have staining or light surface
rust. If there is pitting there is little you can do except keep
things clean and oiled. Remember rust never sleeps. Once the
rust
bacteria are in the metal short of removing the affected metal the
rust can come back. There are several treatments I think others
could advise you on. I personally have not tried them.

Good luck with your new toy and never be afraid to ask a question
of
this group. You may not always like the answer you get but they
will always be from experience.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "hardtoguess03"
<hardtoguess03@> wrote:

Hello,

I have been reading with great interest the FAQ, and a number of
articles regarding "restoring" older lathes. This is because
yesterday, I brought home a newly acquired 13 inch SB.

I have done my best to examine this lathe for wear and overall
condition and have concluded that most of it is in very good
shape
for its age. There is one area, however that I am confused
about -
-
the ways.

Given that this is a 50 something year old item and has clearly
been
used I am trying to ascertain what needs to be done about them.
Basically as I have read here, there are "scraper marks" on the
ends
of the ways in spots that don't get used. I have identified
them
clearly and they are rust free and in excellent shape.

I also read here something to the effect of "most of the work is
done closest to the chuck so that section of the ways might be
more
worn -- true that in my case. In fact there is a tiny ridge
near
the top in one 12 inch section. The ridge is
approximately .001 -
.002. How bad is this on the grand scheme of things?

The second problem I have with the ways and have found no
references
here or otherwise so far is two-fold. (1) there is some rust in
some sections of the ways. I would characterize it as light
with
very light pitting. (2) there are clear marks on the ways near
the
chuck area where it appears that items may have been dropped on
the
ways such that they are nicked.

What can be done about the rust situation and are these "nicks"
common?

The machine is currently dissasembled, so now would be the time
to
address these issues as I clean and reassemble it. I have some
photos and can take more if they would help at all.

Regards,
Eric


Re: cleaning ways on newly acquired 13

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Eric

OK as to your questions about the ware on the bed. There is nothing
you can do about what you have unless you start from scratch and re-
grind the bed and then use Turcite bonded under the saddle to bring
it back up to the correct height. I have done many machines and
here is what you up against. First the bed is made of semi steel.
This is a mix of 50 to 60% steel and 40 to 50% cast iron. The
saddle on the other hand is just cast iron. So what does this all
mean? Eric if you are showing .001 to 002 of ware in the sweet spot
of the bed you will have four times that much ware under the
saddle. One way of checking to see just what damage has been done
is to take a mic and measure the diameter of the lead screw. If the
saddle has settled down a lot there will be ware on the diameter of
the lead screw in the same area as the bed. This is because there
is little clearance between the lead screw and the bushing on the
back of the apron that it passes through. I have seen lead screw
that had as much as .015 of diameter ware do to bad bed and saddle
ware. Check this first as this will give you an idea of the bed
saddle condition.

Now I will say that a little bed ware will not affect the accuracy
of the lathe to much as the bed and saddle have worn together and
should be seated well into each other. This is why you can't do
anything to the bed or saddle short of complete overhaul. The nicks
and dings on the bed ways you can take a nice smooth fine honing
stone and dress the high spots down. These will not effect function
only your pride in the machine. Light rust can be handled a number
of ways. I use white or very fine scotch bright pads and Brasso
brass polish to clean up ways that have staining or light surface
rust. If there is pitting there is little you can do except keep
things clean and oiled. Remember rust never sleeps. Once the rust
bacteria are in the metal short of removing the affected metal the
rust can come back. There are several treatments I think others
could advise you on. I personally have not tried them.

Good luck with your new toy and never be afraid to ask a question of
this group. You may not always like the answer you get but they
will always be from experience.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "hardtoguess03"
<hardtoguess03@...> wrote:

Hello,

I have been reading with great interest the FAQ, and a number of
articles regarding "restoring" older lathes. This is because
yesterday, I brought home a newly acquired 13 inch SB.

I have done my best to examine this lathe for wear and overall
condition and have concluded that most of it is in very good shape
for its age. There is one area, however that I am confused about -
-
the ways.

Given that this is a 50 something year old item and has clearly
been
used I am trying to ascertain what needs to be done about them.
Basically as I have read here, there are "scraper marks" on the
ends
of the ways in spots that don't get used. I have identified them
clearly and they are rust free and in excellent shape.

I also read here something to the effect of "most of the work is
done closest to the chuck so that section of the ways might be
more
worn -- true that in my case. In fact there is a tiny ridge near
the top in one 12 inch section. The ridge is approximately .001 -
.002. How bad is this on the grand scheme of things?

The second problem I have with the ways and have found no
references
here or otherwise so far is two-fold. (1) there is some rust in
some sections of the ways. I would characterize it as light with
very light pitting. (2) there are clear marks on the ways near the
chuck area where it appears that items may have been dropped on
the
ways such that they are nicked.

What can be done about the rust situation and are these "nicks"
common?

The machine is currently dissasembled, so now would be the time to
address these issues as I clean and reassemble it. I have some
photos and can take more if they would help at all.

Regards,
Eric


Re: cleaning ways on newly acquired 13

ed beers
 

On Mon, 2006-05-29 at 04:57 +0000, hardtoguess03 wrote:
In fact there is a tiny ridge near
the top in one 12 inch section. The ridge is approximately .001 -
.002. How bad is this on the grand scheme of things?
That is excellent.

The second problem I have with the ways and have found no references
here or otherwise so far is two-fold. (1) there is some rust in
some sections of the ways. I would characterize it as light with
very light pitting. (2) there are clear marks on the ways near the
chuck area where it appears that items may have been dropped on the
ways such that they are nicked.

What can be done about the rust situation and are these "nicks"
common?
Depressions (nicks, pits, holes) aren't a problem. If any metal has
been displaced upward above the normal surface of the ways, you need to
remove it.

Ed


Re: to paint or not to paint?

ed beers
 

On Sun, 2006-05-28 at 20:35 +0000, john wrote:
My first question is: What is the general consensus on re-painting
a lathe?
Don't do it. If the lathe is in an environment where the ways are safe,
the rest of the lathe needs no further protection. Also, painting
errors can kill your lathe. I have a heavy 10 ten that sustained heavy
wear in a couple areas after oil points were painted over and blocked.

If you are lucky enough to have a lathe that hasn't already fallen
victim to half a dozen amazingly poor paint jobs, leave it alone.

Ed

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