Date   

Re: south bend lathe

tim gunn <timgunn@...>
 

Either "How To Run A Lathe" published by South Bend, or "Know Your Lathe" published by Boxford, will have pictures and copies of the changegear charts. Both are available from http://www.camdenmin.co.uk/EngPrac.htm in the UK.

The Boxford is a British clone of the Southbend 9" and a lot of the spares are common to both. If you have a changegear lathe, you can cut any thread tpi or metric pitch with the correct gears. If you have a threadcutting gearbox, you can cut the threads it is set up for. You can also use a train of changegears between the spindle and gearbox to get threads the gearbox on its own does not cater for, including metric pitches on an imperial lathe or vice versa.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/ has some good general information on South Bend lathes, as well as most other manufacturers.

Regards

Tim Gunn

Date: Fri, 03 Mar 2006 22:42:31 -0000
From: "winn568" <winn568@yahoo.co.uk>
Subject: south bend lathe

Hi,I have a southbend lathe.I think it is a 9 inch workshop model.It
has stamped on the bottom of the tailstock 1936.I assume this isthe
year of manufacture.What I would like to know please,is it possible to
obtain a chart of the t.p.i.that this lathe can cut,and a drawing of
the arrangement of the gear train.Thank you.
Ray Winn.


Re: UK Lathe

David Pidgeon <dave@...>
 

--
Hi Bob:

Just saw your post and welcome. The time frame of your Lathe make me
think it was a War time shippment to the UK to help out when you were
in WWII. Once the USA entered in 1941 we needed them here. That is when
Boxford started up and was permitted to copy the Southbend Lathe. They
made these Lathes well into maybe late 1980's (??) I still get parts
like gears etc from the UK. If you can buy a Boxford Manual and it will
help you with this machine. The Boxford book is much better than the
Southbend. Good Luck

Davethegundoctor



-> I,m in the UK and have zero computer skills and no idea if this
message will ever be read or where it will end up but I have a what I
think [lathe skills and knowledge are commensurate with computer
skills] is a 10" toolroom lathe. The numbers on the bed suggest it was
produced around 1939. I don't know much of it's history but would like
to know more about and how it arrived in the UK. Does anyone know if
there were official agents here and are there many Southbend lathes in
the UK?

Bob.



Re: 4th july in UK

Joe R
 

Paul.
 
    Over thirty years ago I started to build, actually just bought the castings, for a Stewart vertical single cylinder engine and quickly found it was not a beginners project. Then twenty or so years ago I bought a set of  "tich" engine castings. I did the wheels and frame and it's been in a cabinet in the basement for at least 20 years! What I have completed were three models that were part of a series in "Live Steam" magazine. There were simple "one evening" ones to a walking beam engine with a wooden flywheel just over 6 inches that I made on my Atlas/Craftsman 6" lathe. It's made from wood and metal and varnished up real nice. The cylinder on this engine was made from a section of gas line. It runs on compressed air and sits on top of our "Grandmother's" clock. The wife likes the looks of it. I'll need to get it down and run it for the grandkids 2 and 4.
    I guess what I'm hinting at is learn to walk before you run. If you mess up the flywheel on the Stewart you would feel bad but if it was piece out of your scrap bin then no big deal!
 
Joe Romas
Columbus, Ohio USA.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2006 8:23 AM
Subject: RE: [southbendlathe] 4th july in UK

Bob,  How did you know I lived in West Suffield?  You're way ahead of me in computer skills.  What is it you're going to machine on your shop tools?  I'm just learning machining skills so I may machine Stuart castings into stationary steam engines that will move and entertain the grand children much better that the blobs of cast iron.  I've yet to buy a lathe and milling machine, and am seriously considering a South Bend.  What vintage and model do you have?  I'll be looking forward to the pictures on your blog.  I'll send you some of my collection of Stuart steam engines as soon as our son explains to me how blogs work.
 
No need to worry about your type of sense of humor, I would describe mine as wierd, and am glad you didn't take offense at the 4th of July question.  I even chuckled at the tea party pun.
 
What type of engineering company did you have?
 
Got to go now and entertain the grand children with some shop fun.  Can't start them off at too early on stuff like that.  Best regards,  Paul
-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...]On Behalf Of bob mills
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 8:48 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] 4th july in UK

Hello Paul
Thanks for replying, I am simply amazed at my computer skills but to be fair I think luck may have played more than a small part in my success at receiving a [very welcome] reply from a gentleman living over the pond in [West Suffield?] Conneticut. Re your 4th of july enquiry if my memory serves me correctly your reasons for celebrating this day may be a little different to ours but I'll tread carefully, my tongue in cheek sense of humour is sometimes misunderstood. I think we have probably chosen to brush it to one side as it was no tea party for our forefarthers being beaten as they were, but it was a while before my time and in consequence I feel no personal ill will. Nowadays it is made quite a feature in our junior schools, possibly apart from an excuse to party we may have forgiven the past.
Back to lathes as it were, I truly am one of the uneducated, my SB was purchased for and used in a small engineering company I started and was aquired to compliment a Myford [smaller] and a Colchester Student [bigger] and because I liked the "quality" look of it and I am a sucker for vintage cars and equipment.My kids say I like old things because I am old but it's an aesthetic thing I think.
There has been some response already to my question and I hope some more will come, it's likely I will have to sell it eventually, I sold on the business recently but bought back a few chosen items to enjoy but in reality I don't think that I'll get to give it the use it deserves.When I resolve the mysteries of putting photos into emails I will put pictures on a thing called a blog? for anyone to see
My very best regards 
Bob 


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Re: 4th july in UK

dibgib39
 

Bob,  How did you know I lived in West Suffield?  You're way ahead of me in computer skills.  What is it you're going to machine on your shop tools?  I'm just learning machining skills so I may machine Stuart castings into stationary steam engines that will move and entertain the grand children much better that the blobs of cast iron.  I've yet to buy a lathe and milling machine, and am seriously considering a South Bend.  What vintage and model do you have?  I'll be looking forward to the pictures on your blog.  I'll send you some of my collection of Stuart steam engines as soon as our son explains to me how blogs work.
 
No need to worry about your type of sense of humor, I would describe mine as wierd, and am glad you didn't take offense at the 4th of July question.  I even chuckled at the tea party pun.
 
What type of engineering company did you have?
 
Got to go now and entertain the grand children with some shop fun.  Can't start them off at too early on stuff like that.  Best regards,  Paul

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...]On Behalf Of bob mills
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 8:48 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] 4th july in UK

Hello Paul
Thanks for replying, I am simply amazed at my computer skills but to be fair I think luck may have played more than a small part in my success at receiving a [very welcome] reply from a gentleman living over the pond in [West Suffield?] Conneticut. Re your 4th of july enquiry if my memory serves me correctly your reasons for celebrating this day may be a little different to ours but I'll tread carefully, my tongue in cheek sense of humour is sometimes misunderstood. I think we have probably chosen to brush it to one side as it was no tea party for our forefarthers being beaten as they were, but it was a while before my time and in consequence I feel no personal ill will. Nowadays it is made quite a feature in our junior schools, possibly apart from an excuse to party we may have forgiven the past.
Back to lathes as it were, I truly am one of the uneducated, my SB was purchased for and used in a small engineering company I started and was aquired to compliment a Myford [smaller] and a Colchester Student [bigger] and because I liked the "quality" look of it and I am a sucker for vintage cars and equipment.My kids say I like old things because I am old but it's an aesthetic thing I think.
There has been some response already to my question and I hope some more will come, it's likely I will have to sell it eventually, I sold on the business recently but bought back a few chosen items to enjoy but in reality I don't think that I'll get to give it the use it deserves.When I resolve the mysteries of putting photos into emails I will put pictures on a thing called a blog? for anyone to see
My very best regards 
Bob 


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Re: spindle lube

ChristopherS
 

Hi Jim:
Whoever said "You can't teach old Dogs new tricks" was wrong. Until now I wasn't really sure what was happening when placing a chip. I'm referring to the phenomena that occurs when you finally had success and place the chip on the substrate and start nudging it into alignment on the pad. I've aligned it perfectly but it then follows the damn tweezers as I withdraw it!
 
Chris
 
 


physist wrote:

"These days I use a 30 power stereo
microscope and a fine pair of tweezers to manipulate 10 mil x 20 mil
chip parts.   The damn things are so small they stick to the tweezer
from electrostatic attraction. "

The French word for chip is "flea" because of the way they jump about.

Jim B.



YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS






Re: set-up frustrations

wiserguy_12
 

Kim,

Don't worry about questions being too elementary. That is a major
part of this group's activity--helping newcomers. I also am fairly
new to lathe work after a 30 hiatus since high school, but I'll
offer my .02: (I also have a SB 9A)

Your MT3 headstock center should be of an unhardened material.
Generally, I believe, headstock centers are left unhardened, as
opposed to tailstock centers which are hardened. Your headstock
center could be turned down (maintain the proper taper). This not
only allows you to shorten the center, but more importantly it
allows for matching the center of the center to your spindle axis.
Since you may want to do this again, that is one reason why the
center protrudes out a bit from the spindle threads.

If memory serves --not always a safe bet at my age-- your idea that
some lathe dogs have shorter tails is correct. some ebay surfing
will reveal that real South Bend or similar dogs generally have
longer tails than some of the import stuff. So what to do. . . . .

Get dogs with longer tails,

Fabricate an extension for your dog tail--maybe drill and tap a hole
for some allthread. There are probably better ideas for lengthening
the tail.

Use your bent-tail dog as a straight tail. Fasten a bolt to your
face plate which protrudes and engages your dog. The face plate
bolt "pushes" the dog tail.

Fabricate your own dog. I have not personally done this yet. Some
people use a short section of iron pipe which is tapped for a bolt.
Engagement with the face plate can be with another bolt and nut
which protrudes outward from the faceplate to intersect with the dog
bolt. Basically you end up with a two piece tail.

These last suggestions carry a much greater safety risk. Getting
bumped by a nice smoothe bent dog tail is annoying. Having your
hand snagged by a bolt thread or similar can the end of your new
hobby. Also, because turning between centers is generally an out-of-
balance affair, keep turning speeds in the lower ranges.

Others will probably have additional suggestions or warnings.

Since you are just getting started, the learning life will be easier
by just doing some turning using a three jaw chuck and the
tailstock. But you are probably running some test bars, so between
centers will give you the info that you seek.

Happy turning,

David B






--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "k2kimkaiser" <ekaiser@...>
wrote:

Hi group, I have another newbie question(I sure hope I am not
bothering everyone with these)that must have a logical answer.
I have finally finished my SB9-mdlA set-up and am ready to try
my
very first cut ever on a lathe. I have a 1" piece of stock 12"
long
that I want to set-up between centers for a test cut. My problem
is
that my face-plate when threaded on my headstock spindle ends
about
flush with the spindle threads, while the spindle sleeve with a
dead
center protrudes about 2" out from the face-plate. The lathe dog I
bought(an import from Grizzly)for 1"stock only extends about 1-
1/4",
therefore way short of reaching the face-plate slot. A live-center
in
the sleeve extends out even more. Did I buy the wrong dogs?(the
one
for 1-1/2" stock is also too short), are there some on the market
that
have the reach I need? Or is there a set-up procedure that I am
overlooking.

Thanks for any help, Kim


Re: south bend lathe

Sal Oliverio <pocco@...>
 

The chart and photos of the gear arrangement is in the South Bend Lathe Book,"How To Run A Lathe". There is usually a chart on the end gear guard of the Lathe also. You can usually find the Chart, the gear guard with the chart or the SBL book on Ebay. I think the book is on ebay SBL site now. Hope this helps.

----- Original Message -----
From: winn568
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 5:42 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] south bend lathe

Hi,I have a southbend lathe.I think it is a 9 inch workshop model.It
has stamped  on the bottom of the tailstock 1936.I assume this isthe
year of manufacture.What I would like to know please,is it possible to
obtain a chart of the t.p.i.that this lathe can cut,and a drawing of
the arrangement of the gear train.Thank you.
                                             Ray Winn.






Re: Wanted: 9" or 10" Back Geared Screw Cutting Lathe

bamboorodmaker <bamboorodmaker@...>
 

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Rob Purdy" <kb7wnz@...> wrote:

Checkout craigs list For portland and seattle.

----Original Message Follows----
From: "bamboorodmaker" <bamboorodmaker@...>
Reply-To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [southbendlathe] Wanted: 9" or 10" Back Geared Screw
Cutting Lathe
Date: Thu, 02 Mar 2006 06:44:30 -0000

I'm looking for a 9" or 10" bench lathe for my home workshop. The bed
ways and headstock must be in good shape, and the motor should be
110v. I would prefer a QC gearbox but could live with change gears as
long as they are all included. Tooling should include tool holders
and bits, 3&4-jaw chucks, dead centers, and a live center. A collet
set-up would also be nice.

I live in Northern California but would be willing to travel to
Southern California, Nevada, or the Pacific Northwest if a really nice
well-equipped lathe was available.

Thanks
Thanks Rob, I'll do that.


Re: spindle lube

John Dammeyer
 

And the 0403 parts are flea poop.


Wireless CAN with the CANRF module now available.
http://www.autoartisans.com/products
Automation Artisans Inc.
Ph. 1 250 544 4950

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of physist
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2006 7:52 PM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: spindle lube


"These days I use a 30 power stereo
microscope and a fine pair of tweezers to manipulate 10 mil x 20 mil
chip parts. The damn things are so small they stick to the tweezer
from electrostatic attraction. "

The French word for chip is "flea" because of the way they jump about.

Jim B.



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Re: spindle lube

physist <physist@...>
 

"These days I use a 30 power stereo microscope and a fine pair of tweezers to manipulate 10 mil x 20 mil chip parts. The damn things are so small they stick to the tweezer from electrostatic attraction. "

The French word for chip is "flea" because of the way they jump about.

Jim B.


set-up frustrations

k2kimkaiser
 

Hi group, I have another newbie question(I sure hope I am not
bothering everyone with these)that must have a logical answer.
I have finally finished my SB9-mdlA set-up and am ready to try my
very first cut ever on a lathe. I have a 1" piece of stock 12" long
that I want to set-up between centers for a test cut. My problem is
that my face-plate when threaded on my headstock spindle ends about
flush with the spindle threads, while the spindle sleeve with a dead
center protrudes about 2" out from the face-plate. The lathe dog I
bought(an import from Grizzly)for 1"stock only extends about 1-1/4",
therefore way short of reaching the face-plate slot. A live-center in
the sleeve extends out even more. Did I buy the wrong dogs?(the one
for 1-1/2" stock is also too short), are there some on the market that
have the reach I need? Or is there a set-up procedure that I am
overlooking.

Thanks for any help, Kim


Re: spindle lube

gorvil
 

Chris,

I hear what you're saying about old eyes. I have been in the
electronics business for 30 years. I never actually designed
anything with a vacuum tube, but I was a "tube jerker" in my teens.
I still have my old Lafayette tube tester in the basement, not too
far from my South Bend. These days I use a 30 power stereo
microscope and a fine pair of tweezers to manipulate 10 mil x 20 mil
chip parts. The damn things are so small they stick to the tweezer
from electrostatic attraction.

Glen Reeser

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Chris Strazzeri
<cjstrazz@...> wrote:

I must confess that I'm going to be 60 in June. Therefore I wasn't
even born when 1942 rolled in, I just have enormous respect for what
my Dad's generation did. He was a master machinist and I lost him
recently. I guess I miss him and his wisdom.

No disrespect was meant to you or anyone who holds modern
technology in high esteem. How could I? I made electronics my
profession for the last 40 years. I started out with vacuum tubes
and now have to deal with components that my aging eyes can barely
see. I think I've been soldering for the last few years by instinct.

All good fun,
Chris




Gary Mason <carncrows2004@...> wrote:
Gents,
I take your point about 1942 not exactly being the stone
age!.......but it was before my time....lol......geez some of you
are showing your age....lol.
My thoughts were that in 1942 the Southbend lathe bed castings
were more likely to be horizontal planed and then the other parts
H/S, T/S, Saddle etc were hand scraped to final fit?as a new
machine. To recondition an existing bed I imagine a lot of hand
scraping,bluing to master gauges would have been the process?
As an apprentice I recall an old machine fitter nearing
retirement systematically pulling down the lathes in the apprentice
area and o/hauling the beds by hand scraping. I don't recall seeing
any beds sent away for a precision grinding?
Regards,
Gary.

Chris Strazzeri <cjstrazz@...> wrote: Just a thought or two
here. 1942 wasn't exactly the stone age. Magnificent machines were
mass produced. B17's, Iowa class battleships with awesome 16 inch
guns, F4 Corsair's, P38's and P51 Mustangs were in prototype.
Behemoth Big-Boys rolled on our rails. And let us not forget the M1
Garand which in my opinion is finest and definitely the most rugged
military rifle ever made. The M14 comes in a close second as it was
a child of the Garand. And oh those M2 50Cal's oorah! They're still
in use today.

Anyone out there ever heard of the "Proximity Fuse"? It was a US
secret that rivaled the Nordon Bomb Sight. Imagine stuffing fragile
glass vacuum tube circuitry in the business end of an artillery
shell. The shock and G forces were enormous but those 1942 cave men
did it! With sticks and sharp rocks I think!:)

Jeez, looking back over the nostalgia that I wrote gives me
pause. Everything except the Big-Boy is military. Go figure! I
wonder what a shrink would say???

Chris


Gary Mason <carncrows2004@...> wrote:
Hi,
I'm awaiting the arrival of a used saddle for my 9B, then the ways
on the bed and the saddle ways will be matched and precision
ground.In 1942 hand scraping the bed was probably the most
realistic option, but with the improvements in the machinery for
machine tool reconditioning in todays world I'll opt for grinding.
Regards,
Gary.

wheelhousesteam <tom@...> wrote:
Abrasive technology may offer the answr to hand scraping:

"On high quality machine tools the Ways are hand scraped to this
accuracy because is is practictally impossible to grind accurate V-
ways. (THe loss of form or diameter resulting from a single pass
os a
grinding wheel down the lenth of a bed is sufficient to "throw"
the
ways "off")

The Care and Operation of a lathe- Sheldon Machine Co. 1942
pg. 11

Tom

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, nwinblad@ wrote:

Thank you to everyone who took the time to submit such thoughful
replies on lathe lubrication. I am learning a lot from them. With
this new understanding I am sure I will be in a better position to
do
the right thing when it comes to lubrication. I wouldn't mind my
lathe lasting another 60 years.

I thought up one other question regarding lubrication that has
been
knocking around in my old noggin for a bit: I asked the question
of
why we need to scrape the ways now tht grinders can get them nice
and
straight? The answer I got was that the scraping provides a rough
surface to hold lubricant. But, then I got to thinking, South Bend
micro grinds the spindle bearing surface to 50 millionths of an
inch
to provide longer life to the bearings. Would the scraping logic
suggest that they should take sand paper to them instead. Or,
would
it suggest that polished ways would last longer? Or, are they
quite
different models with respect to how the oil flows to these
surfaces?

Neal

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "John" <reproturn@>

Hi Neal

A lecture is well beyond me but here are a few thoughts on the
matter.

'Infernal' combustion engines make great demands on oils due to
churning, heat, water, blow-by gases, etc so the detergents and
other
additives help keep the motor 'clean'. Plus the oil is filtered
hence
the need to keep contaminants in suspension so they can be
scavenged
by the filtering system.

By comparison machine tools are much cleaner and have less
stressful operating conditions so the most of the additives are
not
needed and contaminants need to be able to fall out of suspension
and
so leave the machine or fall to the bottom of the gearbox etc
where
they can be flushed out when the oil is next changed.

All oil is hygroscopic to some extent so regularly changing the
stuff (especially if the oil remains in the machine eg gearbox) is
essential. Hydraulic oils have anti-corrosive additives added, but
yes hydraulic parts are chromed or made of corrosion resistant
metals
such as stainless. I suspect the operating environment of such
equipment has more of a corrosive effect than the absorbed water.

Perhaps there is an oil expert on the list who could set us all
straight on this very important topic?

Cheers
John B
Sydney, Australia

----- Original Message -----
From: Neal Winblad
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 4:31 PM
Subject: RE: [southbendlathe] Re: spindle lube


Maybe I'm just dumb, but I can't figure out why, if motor oil
suspends
the grit and becomes a lapping slurry, we would want to put it
in
our
engines and wear down all the bearings in them? Can somebody
fill
me in.
I don't want to wear out my engine early. Should I use 3-in-1
oil
in my
car to avoid this? Is it just that motor oil holds up to
temperature
better? If detergent keeps the little nooks and crannies of an
automobile engine clean, wouldn't it do the same for a lathe? If
motor
oil has gotten so good that now you only need to change it every
7500
miles and when I was a kid we had to change it every 3000 miles,
then
has spindle oil and way oil and 3-in-1 oil also improved with
time
and
technology? Are all hydraulic cylinders and pumps made of
stainless
steel or chromed so they don't rust or is the oil so hygroscopic
that
the water preferentially bonds with the oil so none is left to
cause
rust? I recently used a mister which has a mix rate of 1
part "stuff" to
50 parts water. It kept the part really cool, I think from the
water
evaporating in the compressed air stream thus pulling heat out
of
the
airstream. Is keeping the part cool sufficient, or is there a
lubricating function of "cutting oil" which is somewhat lost
with a
mister and practically pure water formula? Questions that have
been
bouncing around in the back of my head for a while. Can someone
give a
mini-lecture on this?

Neal

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of kc1fp
Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 6:21 PM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: spindle lube

Mineral oil? Is the spindle constipated?

Why do so many people want to use something other than spindle
oil
in
the resevoirs of the SB lathe spindles. It is low cost, readily
available and the system was designed for its use. You have a
lubrication system based upon capillary action of the felt wicks
and a
small temperature gradient. It works very well with Spindle oil,
but
not very well with mineral oil which is what ATF is, along with
misc
chemicals. I think extra virgin olive oil might work better than
ATF.

Then we have the gearheads with motor oil. They must like having
particles kept in suspension grinding on the spindle; or the real
smart ones who like to use hydraulic oil and water. Yes,
hydraulic
oil
is hydroscopic, it absorbs water from the air. Maybe they like
the
color of rust.

I will never understand it.

JP


--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "seikosman" <seikopugss@>
wrote:

Thank you all for your input; sounds like it's unanimous;
I've
been
using ATF and had no problem; guess I'd better stick with it!

Rick A.






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4th july in UK

bob mills
 

Hello Paul
Thanks for replying, I am simply amazed at my computer skills but to be fair I think luck may have played more than a small part in my success at receiving a [very welcome] reply from a gentleman living over the pond in [West Suffield?] Conneticut. Re your 4th of july enquiry if my memory serves me correctly your reasons for celebrating this day may be a little different to ours but I'll tread carefully, my tongue in cheek sense of humour is sometimes misunderstood. I think we have probably chosen to brush it to one side as it was no tea party for our forefarthers being beaten as they were, but it was a while before my time and in consequence I feel no personal ill will. Nowadays it is made quite a feature in our junior schools, possibly apart from an excuse to party we may have forgiven the past.
Back to lathes as it were, I truly am one of the uneducated, my SB was purchased for and used in a small engineering company I started and was aquired to compliment a Myford [smaller] and a Colchester Student [bigger] and because I liked the "quality" look of it and I am a sucker for vintage cars and equipment.My kids say I like old things because I am old but it's an aesthetic thing I think.
There has been some response already to my question and I hope some more will come, it's likely I will have to sell it eventually, I sold on the business recently but bought back a few chosen items to enjoy but in reality I don't think that I'll get to give it the use it deserves.When I resolve the mysteries of putting photos into emails I will put pictures on a thing called a blog? for anyone to see
My very best regards 
Bob 


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inch/metric heavy 10 for sale

fred eisner
 

hi guys
i just got in an absolutly perfect late model heavy 10 with inch/metric dials - rare option
it has hardened ways, steady & follow rests, 3 & 4 jaw chucks, collet draw bar & complete set of hardinge 5C collets x 1/16", centers, tailstock chuck, micrometer stop, threading stop, aloris toolpost & holders,
the ways are excellant, machine has original paint, 3 phase motor, D1-4 spindle
the machine is from the late 80's
im located near nyc zip 10703 for freight estimate on 1000lbs crated - i have a forklift and i can load your truck - you are welcome to stop by and try out the machines - no loading fee
$2850 + shipping & optional crating fee of $150
i also have 2 other late model heavy 10's equally tooled but without the inch/metric dials - one has a taper with D1-4 and the other has no taper with L-00 spindle
i also have other lathes, bridgeports, surface grinders, sheet metal fabrication machines, bandsaws etc etc etc
im the guy from cabin fever who sells the scrap metal
thanks guys
fred 914 720 5523


Re: OT RE: Me262

ChristopherS
 

Thanks for that. I was aware of the parkinson's but not the speed.
Chris

Neal Winblad wrote:

>Yes, yes, yes. Give me more! This is good stuff! Herman Goering couldn't get Hitler to see the value of the jets. Basically, old Adolph wasn't the brightest bulb in the pack, but he had a brilliant staff. Fortunately for us he had a nasty habit of killing them off!
 
Well, that�and the fact that he was an amphetamine addict who was paranoid and couldn�t thing rationally (as speed freaks are inclined to do). And then there�s the recent discovery that he had Parkinson�s disease and was dying�so, his big ego pushed the war faster than the Germans could support the effort, in order to try to conquer the world before he died.




Re: spindle lube

ChristopherS
 

I must confess that I'm going to be 60 in June. Therefore I wasn't even born when 1942 rolled in, I just have enormous respect for what my Dad's generation did. He was a master machinist and I lost him recently. I guess I miss him and his wisdom.
 
No disrespect was meant to you or anyone who holds modern technology in high esteem. How could I? I made electronics my profession for the last 40 years. I started out with vacuum tubes and now have to deal with components that my aging eyes can barely see. I think I've been soldering for the last few years by instinct.
 
All good fun,
Chris 
 
 


Gary Mason wrote:

Gents,
I take your point about 1942 not exactly being the stone age!.......but it was before my time....lol......geez some of you are showing your age....lol.
 My thoughts were that in 1942 the Southbend lathe bed castings were more likely to be horizontal planed and then the other parts H/S, T/S, Saddle etc were hand scraped to final fit?as a new machine. To recondition an existing bed I imagine a lot of hand scraping,bluing to master gauges would have been the process?
 As an apprentice I recall an old machine fitter nearing retirement systematically pulling down the lathes in the apprentice area and o/hauling the beds by hand scraping. I don't recall seeing any beds sent away for a precision grinding?
Regards,
Gary.

Chris Strazzeri wrote:
Just a thought or two here. 1942 wasn't exactly the stone age. Magnificent machines were mass produced. B17's, Iowa class battleships with awesome 16 inch guns, F4 Corsair's, P38's and P51 Mustangs were in prototype. Behemoth Big-Boys rolled on our rails. And let us not forget the M1 Garand which in my opinion is finest and definitely the most rugged military rifle ever made. The M14 comes in a close second as it was a child of the Garand. And oh those M2 50Cal's oorah! They're still in use today.
 
Anyone out there ever heard of the "Proximity Fuse"? It was a US secret that rivaled the Nordon Bomb Sight. Imagine stuffing fragile glass vacuum tube circuitry in the business end of an artillery shell. The shock and G forces were enormous but those 1942 cave men did it! With sticks and sharp rocks I think!:)
 
Jeez, looking back over the nostalgia that I wrote gives me pause. Everything except the Big-Boy is military. Go figure! I wonder what a shrink would say???
 
Chris


Gary Mason wrote:
Hi,
I'm awaiting the arrival of a used saddle for my 9B, then the ways on the bed and the saddle ways will be matched and precision ground.In 1942 hand scraping the bed  was probably the most realistic option, but with the improvements in the machinery for machine tool reconditioning in todays world I'll opt for grinding.
Regards,
Gary.

wheelhousesteam wrote:

Abrasive technology may offer the answr to hand scraping:

"On high quality machine tools the Ways are hand scraped to this
accuracy because is is practictally impossible to grind accurate V-
ways. (THe loss of form or diameter resulting from a single pass os a
grinding wheel down the lenth of a bed is sufficient to "throw" the
ways "off")

The Care and Operation of a lathe- Sheldon Machine Co. 1942
pg. 11

Tom

--- In southbendlathe@..., nwinblad@... wrote:
>
> Thank you to everyone who took the time to submit such thoughful
replies on lathe lubrication. I am learning a lot from them. With
this new understanding I am sure I will be in a better position to do
the right thing when it comes to lubrication. I wouldn't mind my
lathe lasting another 60 years.
>
> I thought up one other question regarding lubrication that has been
knocking around in my old noggin for a bit: I asked the question of
why we need to scrape the ways now tht grinders can get them nice and
straight? The answer I got was that the scraping provides a rough
surface to hold lubricant. But, then I got to thinking, South Bend
micro grinds the spindle bearing surface to 50 millionths of an inch
to provide longer life to the bearings. Would the scraping logic
suggest that they should take sand paper to them instead. Or, would
it suggest that polished ways would last longer? Or, are they quite
different models with respect to how the oil flows to these surfaces?
>
> Neal
>
> -------------- Original message --------------
> From: "John"
>
> Hi Neal
>
> A lecture is well beyond me but here are a few thoughts on the
matter.
>
> 'Infernal' combustion engines make great demands on oils due to
churning, heat, water, blow-by gases, etc so the detergents and other
additives help keep the motor 'clean'. Plus the oil is filtered hence
the need to keep contaminants in suspension so they can be scavenged
by the filtering system.
>
> By comparison machine tools are much cleaner and have less
stressful operating conditions so the most of the additives are not
needed and contaminants need to be able to fall out of suspension and
so leave the machine or fall to the bottom of the gearbox etc where
they can be flushed out when the oil is next changed.
>
> All oil is hygroscopic to some extent so regularly changing the
stuff (especially if the oil remains in the machine eg gearbox) is
essential. Hydraulic oils have anti-corrosive additives added, but
yes hydraulic parts are chromed or made of corrosion resistant metals
such as stainless. I suspect the operating environment of such
equipment has more of a corrosive effect than the absorbed water.
>
> Perhaps there is an oil expert on the list who could set us all
straight on this very important topic?
>
> Cheers
> John B
> Sydney, Australia
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Neal Winblad
> To: southbendlathe@...
> Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 4:31 PM
> Subject: RE: [southbendlathe] Re: spindle lube
>
>
> Maybe I'm just dumb, but I can't figure out why, if motor oil
suspends
> the grit and becomes a lapping slurry, we would want to put it in
our
> engines and wear down all the bearings in them? Can somebody fill
me in.
> I don't want to wear out my engine early. Should I use 3-in-1 oil
in my
> car to avoid this? Is it just that motor oil holds up to temperature
> better? If detergent keeps the little nooks and crannies of an
> automobile engine clean, wouldn't it do the same for a lathe? If
motor
> oil has gotten so good that now you only need to change it every
7500
> miles and when I was a kid we had to change it every 3000 miles,
then
> has spindle oil and way oil and 3-in-1 oil also improved with time
and
> technology? Are all hydraulic cylinders and pumps made of stainless
> steel or chromed so they don't rust or is the oil so hygroscopic
that
> the water preferentially bonds with the oil so none is left to cause
> rust? I recently used a mister which has a mix rate of 1
part "stuff" to
> 50 parts water. It kept the part really cool, I think from the water
> evaporating in the compressed air stream thus pulling heat out of
the
> airstream. Is keeping the part cool sufficient, or is there a
> lubricating function of "cutting oil" which is somewhat lost with a
> mister and practically pure water formula? Questions that have been
> bouncing around in the back of my head for a while. Can someone
give a
> mini-lecture on this?
>
> Neal
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: southbendlathe@...
> [mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of kc1fp
> Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 6:21 PM
> To: southbendlathe@...
> Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: spindle lube
>
> Mineral oil? Is the spindle constipated?
>
> Why do so many people want to use something other than spindle oil
in
> the resevoirs of the SB lathe spindles. It is low cost, readily
> available and the system was designed for its use. You have a
> lubrication system based upon capillary action of the felt wicks
and a
> small temperature gradient. It works very well with Spindle oil, but
> not very well with mineral oil which is what ATF is, along with misc
> chemicals. I think extra virgin olive oil might work better than
ATF.
>
> Then we have the gearheads with motor oil. They must like having
> particles kept in suspension grinding on the spindle; or the real
> smart ones who like to use hydraulic oil and water. Yes, hydraulic
oil
> is hydroscopic, it absorbs water from the air. Maybe they like the
> color of rust.
>
> I will never understand it.
>
> JP
>
>
> --- In southbendlathe@..., "seikosman"
> wrote:
> >
> > Thank you all for your input; sounds like it's unanimous;  I've
been
> > using ATF and had no problem; guess I'd better stick with it!
> >
> > Rick A.
> >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> Web: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
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> Newbie guide: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SouthBendLathePix/ Files
> area
> FAQ:
>
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/files/SouthBendLatheFAQ.h
tm
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> Post: mailto:southbendlathe@...
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> --
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Re: Wanted: 9" or 10" Back Geared Screw Cutting Lathe

Rob Purdy
 

Checkout craigs list For portland and seattle.

----Original Message Follows----
From: "bamboorodmaker" <bamboorodmaker@yahoo.com>
Reply-To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [southbendlathe] Wanted: 9" or 10" Back Geared Screw Cutting Lathe
Date: Thu, 02 Mar 2006 06:44:30 -0000

I'm looking for a 9" or 10" bench lathe for my home workshop. The bed
ways and headstock must be in good shape, and the motor should be
110v. I would prefer a QC gearbox but could live with change gears as
long as they are all included. Tooling should include tool holders
and bits, 3&4-jaw chucks, dead centers, and a live center. A collet
set-up would also be nice.

I live in Northern California but would be willing to travel to
Southern California, Nevada, or the Pacific Northwest if a really nice
well-equipped lathe was available.

Thanks


south bend lathe

winn568 <winn568@...>
 

Hi,I have a southbend lathe.I think it is a 9 inch workshop model.It
has stamped on the bottom of the tailstock 1936.I assume this isthe
year of manufacture.What I would like to know please,is it possible to
obtain a chart of the t.p.i.that this lathe can cut,and a drawing of
the arrangement of the gear train.Thank you.
Ray Winn.


OT RE: Me262

nwinblad
 

>Yes, yes, yes. Give me more! This is good stuff! Herman Goering couldn't get Hitler to see the value of the jets. Basically, old Adolph wasn't the brightest bulb in the pack, but he had a brilliant staff. Fortunately for us he had a nasty habit of killing them off!

 

Well, that…and the fact that he was an amphetamine addict who was paranoid and couldn’t thing rationally (as speed freaks are inclined to do). And then there’s the recent discovery that he had Parkinson’s disease and was dying…so, his big ego pushed the war faster than the Germans could support the effort, in order to try to conquer the world before he died.




Re: Me262

ChristopherS
 

Yes, yes, yes. Give me more! This is good stuff! Herman Goering couldn't get Hitler to see the value of the jets. Basically, old Adolph wasn't the brightest bulb in the pack, but he had a brilliant staff. Fortunately for us he had a nasty habit of killing them off!
 
Thanks,
Chris


Thomas.G.Brandl@... wrote:


From what I've read, the Me262 could have been operational about '43.
Hitler did want a dive bomber to replace the Ju-87 Stuka. Actually the
Fw-190's did well in that role. Simular to the P-47 Thunderbolt. The Me 262
did operate as a fighter. About the only way a Mustang could shoot it down
at speed was in a banked turn and full throttle. Most Me 262s were shot
down either at takeoff or landing. The Germans had some other weapons and
aircraft that were at least 10 years ahead of the time. There were other
jets that were near operational. The Me 262 was not surpassed until the Mig
15 and F-87 Sabre. Those jets were heavily influenced on a German Jet with
swept wings. The germans also had a jet bomber the Avrado at or near
operational and the Horten in the prototype stage. Plus the Heinckle
Salamander.
      The allies did have a Jet that was operating durng WWII, the Gloster
Meteor. It was used to shoot down V-1 buzz bombs over London late in the
war. The F-80 was close to being placed into service at the end of WWII.
                 Now if your impressed with all those Mustangs etc. just
remember it was the lowly Gruman F4 Wildcat that won the day at Coral Sea,
Midway and the early days of Guadal Canal.
                                                            Tom


|---------+------------------------------>
|         |           Clif               |
|         |              |
|         |           Sent by:           |
|         |           southbendlathe@yaho|
|         |           ogroups.com        |
|         |                              |
|         |                              |
|         |           03/03/2006 03:45 PM|
|         |           Please respond to  |
|         |           southbendlathe     |
|         |                              |
|---------+------------------------------>
  >---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|
  |                                                                                                               |
  |       To:       southbendlathe@...                                                                |
  |       cc:                                                                                                     |
  |       Subject:  [southbendlathe] Re: spindle lube                                                             |
  >---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|




My uncle was a tail gunner on a B26 (IIRC) he fought against the
ME262. He stated they couldn't swing the guns fast enough to stay up
with them. The thought that Hitler had a workable fighter and delayed
production for over a year while it was made into a fighter/bomber
scared the bejeezus out of him. This was after the war was over and
information was released about the Luftwaffe. His opinion was that was
one of his major blunders. The Germans would have owned the skies.

Clif


> The brilliant leader of the opposing forces declared the Me262 a
> bomber, so it was not put into fighter roles on purpose.
>
> If it had, things could have got really nasty for the 8TH Air Force.
> Brian
>
> BTW, my 1940 10L was around when they were turning scrap into all
> that wonderful stuff.
> sigh.
>
>
> --- In southbendlathe@..., Chris Strazzeri
> wrote:
> >
> > I hate to say it but I believe the Luftwaffe produced the first in
> theater jets. We had none in combat that I know of at any time during
> the war. Our P38's and Mustangs went up against them near the end of
> the war and were able to out maneuver them. I could be wrong though.
> I'd like to be!
> >
> >   Chris
> >





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