Date   

Re: Back Gears on 10K

dirigo28 <dirigo28@...>
 

Shawn,I have the South Bend procedure for adjusting the back gears
in a 10k. The set screw at the front sets the drag and the one at the
rear is the stop which controls the depth of mesh. The front set screw
should be tighten just enough to keep the gears in mesh, no more. The
back gear lever should not be hard to operate. The rear set screw
should be adjusted with back gear running and set to provide minimum
noise. A howling noise indicates too little clearance, a rattling
noise too much.

Ed P


Re: Re - Internal threading bar

Kevin Gregg
 

Bob-

That looks pretty good. My current project requires a
.5" hole to be threaded though - so that may be a
little big. I may try to make a cross between yours
and something like this:

<img
src="http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B0000DD5Z7.01-A3TQ3OIW6NTQKL._SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg"
/>


Maybe a rod with a slit cut in in for a 1/4" bit
ground down to 1/8" or so - then held in place with a
setscrew. What do you think?





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Re: 1922 9" Reverse tumbler gear

Steve Wells
 

John,
Thanks for your reply,
I am new to this group, and a "newbie" at using a lathe.
As far as I can tell, you are correct, the gears are 16 DP
and 14 1/2 PA. The DP of the gears I bought appear to be 20.
I should have done the research (sigh).
My reverse gears measure 1 1/2 x 9/16 with 1/2 bore.

Steve Wells
swells@...


End Gear Cover

fiveonepw@...
 

Howdy-

The mounting pin on my 9"SB end gear guard is loose and on close inspection seems to be soldered into the aluminum casting, not the eccentric shown in the Army Technical Manual.  Is this another factory way of installing the pin or a repair made sometime in the long history of my lathe?

I've also noted that the "bearing" for the tailstock end of the apron drive shaft appears to have a poured-in-place lead (babbit?) bearing- stock or another possible repair?  I could find no reference in the manual about the drive shaft or this bearing at all.

Thanks!
Mark Phillips


Buy New SB Lathe ?

borpe2001
 

I understand South bend still makes 10" lathes: CL187-BR -$12,950 !
See www.southbendlathe.com/eng10.htm. It is reasonable to buy these
lathes new ? How does the quality compare with lathes
manufactured earlier ?


Re: Turning 4130 Chrome Moly

bdmail <bdmail@...>
 

YOU CAN BUY THE EQUIPMENT YOU NEED WITH A QUARTER OR LESS THAN THAT!!!

So I think you should, instead of giving it to someone else to buy himself more equipment.


Bernie



on 1/24/05 10:13 PM, David J. Young at davey@... wrote:


So you think turning (for example) a 3" diameter shaft down to say
1.33" might be a son of a gun? Sounds to me it will be, but I wanted
to talk to you guys first.  He's wanting some machine work done (I
don't have the specifics of what he's got in mind yet), but a machine
shop quoted him $1800 for four of these things made, including some
splines, shoulders and accurate holes.  I'm not to the point that I
can do splines yet (nor the correct tooling), but he was trying to
reduce this cost if I could turn it down.

Thank you!!!!

Dave Young

--- In southbendlathe@..., "BOB & CINDY WRIGHT"
wrote:
>
> Hi Dave, I turn 4130 and it does turn harder. I have used carbide and
> HSS bits. The only real problem i have had is facing to a shoulder
> and trying to keep it flat, It seems to run out a few thou. But i
> will keep trying. I find it at work in the dumpster . The stud on
> my tool post is 4130 and i turned the bottom off with no problem...Bob







Re: Turning 4130 Chrome Moly

kc1fp
 

Dave, Have him drop half of that ($) and pick up a used Bridgeport to
make the splines, etc. Both of you will benefit. Pay particular
attention to the stock you get, some of it comes annealed and some
does not. JP


--- In southbendlathe@..., "David J. Young" <davey@m...>
wrote:

So you think turning (for example) a 3" diameter shaft down to say
1.33" might be a son of a gun? Sounds to me it will be, but I wanted
to talk to you guys first. He's wanting some machine work done (I
don't have the specifics of what he's got in mind yet), but a machine
shop quoted him $1800 for four of these things made, including some
splines, shoulders and accurate holes. I'm not to the point that I
can do splines yet (nor the correct tooling), but he was trying to
reduce this cost if I could turn it down.

Thank you!!!!

Dave Young

--- In southbendlathe@..., "BOB & CINDY WRIGHT"
<aametalmaster@y...> wrote:

Hi Dave, I turn 4130 and it does turn harder. I have used carbide and
HSS bits. The only real problem i have had is facing to a shoulder
and trying to keep it flat, It seems to run out a few thou. But i
will keep trying. I find it at work in the dumpster <G>. The stud on
my tool post is 4130 and i turned the bottom off with no problem...Bob


Re: Turning 4130 Chrome Moly

David J. Young <davey@...>
 

So you think turning (for example) a 3" diameter shaft down to say
1.33" might be a son of a gun? Sounds to me it will be, but I wanted
to talk to you guys first. He's wanting some machine work done (I
don't have the specifics of what he's got in mind yet), but a machine
shop quoted him $1800 for four of these things made, including some
splines, shoulders and accurate holes. I'm not to the point that I
can do splines yet (nor the correct tooling), but he was trying to
reduce this cost if I could turn it down.

Thank you!!!!

Dave Young

--- In southbendlathe@..., "BOB & CINDY WRIGHT"
<aametalmaster@y...> wrote:

Hi Dave, I turn 4130 and it does turn harder. I have used carbide and
HSS bits. The only real problem i have had is facing to a shoulder
and trying to keep it flat, It seems to run out a few thou. But i
will keep trying. I find it at work in the dumpster <G>. The stud on
my tool post is 4130 and i turned the bottom off with no problem...Bob


Re: Turning 4130 Chrome Moly

BOB WRIGHT
 

Hi Dave, I turn 4130 and it does turn harder. I have used carbide and
HSS bits. The only real problem i have had is facing to a shoulder
and trying to keep it flat, It seems to run out a few thou. But i
will keep trying. I find it at work in the dumpster <G>. The stud on
my tool post is 4130 and i turned the bottom off with no problem...Bob
--- In southbendlathe@..., "David J. Young" <davey@m...>
wrote:

My son is entering the 2006 Darpa race (http://www.darpa.mil) and
was
asking me if I can turn 4130 chrome moly. I'm assuming I can (9"
Model A SB), but was wondering what it involved. Does it turn like
316 stainless, or is it more difficult; does it require carbide
bits, etc?

Thanks again guys....

Dave


Re: Back Gears on 10K

BOB WRIGHT
 

Hi Shawn, You are on the right track. My 10K jumped out also. I
tightned up the 2 setscrews then the locknuts and that cured the
problem. Mine also stayed in if i held the handle. Try the setscrews
again it should work...Bob
--- In southbendlathe@..., "fuzzywuzzy321"
<fuzzywuzzy321@y...> wrote:

I recently joined the group after purchasing a SB 10K lathe, and I
read over the entire FAQ. I know it tells you where to find the
file on Back Gear Adjustment, and in that folder it only has
instructions on adjusting a 13 or 16 inch lathe, not a 9 or 10
inch. My Back gears pop out imediatly upon startup, and they seem
to be meshed to tight against their mating gears too. I can hold
them in place while the lathe runs, and it works just fine, but
there is a lot of force pushing them backwards. The only things I
saw to adjust this was two set-type screws underneath the
eccentrics, and they didn't help. I can't figure this one out.

Shawn


Back Gears on 10K

fuzzywuzzy321 <fuzzywuzzy321@...>
 

I recently joined the group after purchasing a SB 10K lathe, and I
read over the entire FAQ. I know it tells you where to find the
file on Back Gear Adjustment, and in that folder it only has
instructions on adjusting a 13 or 16 inch lathe, not a 9 or 10
inch. My Back gears pop out imediatly upon startup, and they seem
to be meshed to tight against their mating gears too. I can hold
them in place while the lathe runs, and it works just fine, but
there is a lot of force pushing them backwards. The only things I
saw to adjust this was two set-type screws underneath the
eccentrics, and they didn't help. I can't figure this one out.

Shawn


Turning 4130 Chrome Moly

David J. Young <davey@...>
 

My son is entering the 2006 Darpa race (http://www.darpa.mil) and was
asking me if I can turn 4130 chrome moly. I'm assuming I can (9"
Model A SB), but was wondering what it involved. Does it turn like
316 stainless, or is it more difficult; does it require carbide bits, etc?

Thanks again guys....

Dave


Millerette

Anthony Rhodes
 

After the discussion of the millerette I accessed the photos which were
referenced, then there has been some discussion of various gear setups. I don't
know what gears came with the device, and I'd like to know more about it. Did
anybody come up with a manual or instructions for it? I'd really like to get
whatever info is available. If anybody can help please contact me at:
anthrhodes @ aol dot com

Thanks.
Anthony
Berkeley, Calif.


Re: Internal Threading Bars

Alan Rothenbush <alan@...>
 

On Monday 24 January 2005 14:30, Kevin Gregg wrote:
Does anyone have a source for a good RH internal
threading bar? Or plans to make one?
Boy, can this be a can of worms.

I say this after having purchased a whole bunch of different sized internal
threading bars with matching carbide inserts, spending a zillion dollars
doing so.

You have to purchase a whole bunch because the ones small enough to cut a
1/4" dia. thread won't go deep enough to cut a decent length 1/2 " thread,
and the ones long enough to cut a decent length of 1/2 thread can't thread
anything really coarse, and so on.

(There's a reason why they make all those different sized inserts)

Then you find that to use carbide inserts, you REALLY have to have the machine
running fast (just like everyone told you but you never really believed)
because you get really lousy threads if you don't; the tool tears instead of
cuts.

If it at all works for you (micro-diameter being the only reason it wouldn't),
I would seriously consider using an old-fashioned boring tool with a 1/4 HSS
toolbit, ground to 60 degrees and held at 90 degrees by a setscrew.

Here's Harbor Fright's version, $16.00

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=2456

Spend some time making a nice jig to grind the cutters to precisely 60 degrees
and you'll be a happy guy, with lots of cash left over for some single-malt.


Alan


--
Alan Rothenbush
Academic Computing Services
Simon Fraser University
Burnaby, B.C., Canada


Before me things create were none, save things
Eternal, and eternal I endure.
All hope abandon ye who enter here.


Re - Internal threading bar

BOB WRIGHT
 


Internal Threading Bars

Kevin Gregg
 

Does anyone have a source for a good RH internal
threading bar? Or plans to make one?

-Kevin



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Re: identifying a lathe

BOB WRIGHT
 

The 10K has nice covers too. LOL ...Bob


--- In southbendlathe@..., bdmail <bdmail@o...> wrote:
Measure the height from the center of the spindle to the bed.
If it is 5² its a 10 inch

If it is less than 5² it is a 9 inch.


Bernie

I's a 10 inch, but not a heavy 10. The heavy 10 (I think) has nice
covers over the belt and such. This has change gears, open pulley
and no noticable motor mounting.

Dave


Re: Intro and question about 13" (link to pics)

Jon <hoff7133@...>
 

Thanks for the info. The # is 6836TKL13. The ways are in super shape
with almost no wear just some surface rust. The bed is over 5 feet
long which is nice.
No I'm not really "in the loop" with the AFB auctions but I hear
they have some neat stuff from time to time.


Re: identifying a lathe

Dave Mucha
 

--- In southbendlathe@..., bdmail <bdmail@o...> wrote:
Measure the height from the center of the spindle to the bed.
If it is 5² its a 10 inch

If it is less than 5² it is a 9 inch.


Bernie

I's a 10 inch, but not a heavy 10. The heavy 10 (I think) has nice
covers over the belt and such. This has change gears, open pulley
and no noticable motor mounting.

Dave


Re: gear cutting with millerett

tjg6955 <tgolden@...>
 

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Chris" <cdm337257@h...> wrote:

Hello to all,
I have a problem that maybe someone can help with. I have the S.B.
gear cutting attachment and a friend asked if I could make a couple
of gears for him. I thought I would give it a try. He needs a 20
tooth and a 110 tooth set. After making a few parts to mount the
attachment and a arbor for the cutter, I set up and made the 20
tooth gear. I think it came out pretty good. Now the problem. The
attachment has a chart that shows divisions from 2 thru 50, and
360.
It gives the change gear combination for each division, one gear on
the lever and one gear on the worm shaft. I have been trying to
figure out how to get the gear combo for 110 teeth. I assume you
have to figure the worm ratio, the divisions, and ???? All the
books
I have that deal with indexing are the plate type head. Im sure
theres a connection but Im not seeing it. The worm gear has 90
teeth
so I guess that makes it 90:1 ratio. Any ideas out there? Thanks,
Chris.
In my previous post, I forgot that you should have a 22 tooth gear in
millerette gear set. Then, if you have both the 22 tooth and 18 tooth
gears, put the 22 tooth gear on the worm shaft and the 18 tooth gear
on the index lever, one turn of the index lever will turn the gear
blank 3.272727 degrees. This combination will give you your 110
divisions per circle and you won't have to make any gears if you have
the complete millerette gear set.

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