Date   

AXA 22 Threading

Jackie Blake
 

When at KBC Tools the other day I picked up a coated threading
insert that fits this AXA 22. It's got the 1/64" radius and cost $14
CDN. I was going to buy the AXA threading tool but if this works out
then it will be a $ saver. Has anyone here have both the AXA22 and
the AXA threading tool that could tell me the one that works best for
threading? Thanks.


Re: Belts

HUNLEY31@...
 

Jim,
I just replaced the belt on my 9". Laced it on with wax thread using directions from somewhere on the Internet. Works great,hard to believe how quiet it runs.
Larry


Re: Belts

terranovapress@...
 

Gary

Thank you for that neat story. There were a lot of true patriots like that guy and his SB. During the early years of the war, the military needed something called an "Amici roof prism" that was devilishly difficult to make and for the first few years, before the big optical companies could get tooled up, all the Amici prisms for the war effort were made by amateurs working in their cellars.

Re cement: I just clipped a new leather belt but considered cementing one. I was told also to use "barge cement" and indeed, my local shoe repair shop has it in stock. I think it was 6 bucks a tube. I didn't buy it but suspect it is the same as "Pliobond" which I use to cement very thin leather to brass.

Does anyone know if Pliobond is strong enough for belts?

Frank

You would
have had to seen the one part he had left in order to appericate the
job he did.

Gary P. Hansen
ENGINEERING DRAFTING SERVICES




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Re: Shop tip of the day!

terranovapress@...
 

HCl (sold in plumbing supply places as "muriatic acid") will react, possibly violently, with aluminum.

Alum is an aluminum sulfate (or a complex thereof) and although I've never heard it used this way, probably acts electrolytically.

thanks for that tip!

Frank

Hi Dave,

Not an acid, hot saturated solution of alum in water. As noted, only
works for aluminum, it eats steels.

There may well be an acid that doesn't bother aluminum but eats steel,
for some reason I'm thinking HCl, but wouldn't want to swear to it.

Cheers,
Stan

Dave Mucha wrote:
<snip>


I'm drawing a blank on the acid, but there is also a common one that
works when you break a tap in aluminum.
> Dave


Re: Digest Number 1006

catboat15@...
 

In a message dated 6/25/2003 3:16:29 AM Pacific Standard Time, southbendlathe@... writes:


I'm looking to purchase a Jacobs style headstock chuck


I have one on my Craftsman 12 inch. And, no I don't want to sell it. The advantages over a chuck on an arbor are less overhang, and with the chuck screwed onto the spindle you can pass work through the spindle. It is more accurate than a normal three jaw, somewhere between collets and the usual amateur three jaw.  The only dis-advantage I have found is that presently I am engaged in a project that needs a bunch of small pins from 1/8 and 3/32 drill rod with 3-48 and 4-40 threaded ends. The Jacobs headstock chuck will not close down that far so have to use the big three jaw. Kind of scary with those big jaws flying around close to my nose (and hands).
John
LBSC Virginia
LBSC Tich
200 some feet of 3.5 inch ground level track


Re: For Rose (Sorry, but I gotta ask)

dennis pantazis
 

john et all:
the coding thing is true, but in a different manner. it's coded in the
catalogue number by the suffix. i only know this to be true for 9" lathes.
maybe rose can elaborate on if we can extend this to other lathe series as
well.

this is on the original south bend site. i also have it on mine-

http://personalpages.tds.net/~dpantazis/sbl-web/9centers.htm

Y is 3', Z is 3.5', A is 4', R is 4.5'

you can also get the catalogue code out of the serial number to a point,
see-

http://personalpages.tds.net/~dpantazis/sbl-web/9sncode.htm

dennis


Re: Belts

garyphansen
 

Jim:
I have read other posts that said barge cement was the stuff to
use. (what ever theat is) They claimed you could get at a shoe repair
shop or a leather shop.

When I bought my lathe it was missing the gear chart. An old guy
that worked for my dad had a 9" Southbend and told my dad to send me
over on a Saturday and I could copy down his. At the time (1979) I
think Southbend wanted $40. for a brass one. Anyway, when I went
over to his house he was gluing up a replacement belt for his
headstock. He claimed that you could do more accurate work with a
glued belt VS a cliped one.

Then he showed me a small part he made and asked me if I knew what
it was. I said I did not, and he said he did not either and he had
been trying to find out ever since World War II ended. He had been
to old to fight, so he wanted to buy a lathe and use his skills to
help the war effort. He applied to the War Dept. to buy the lathe
and they showed him this part and asked him if he could make it. It
was +/- .0001, a tolerance not easily achieved on a lathe. He said
he could and they gave him an order for nine and aproved his purchase
of the Southbend Model A bench lathe. If I remember right, I think
he paid $350.00, a huge amount at the time considering the Army was
paying my dad just a little more than that for a years worth of
fighting.

There was a number of opperations for each part and he had to design
and make the fixtures and grind the tools he needed to make the
parts. He started 30 parts and made seven into scrap. When he had
finished 12 parts Army inspectors came and rejected one and paid for
11. He finished the other 11 and before the war was over the Army
bought 10 of the last 11. (The first 9 ,more than paid for his
lathe.) He said he would have never had been able to hold those
tolerances except for three things, the lathe was new, he had glued
belts and he was praying all the time he was working. You would
have had to seen the one part he had left in order to appericate the
job he did.

Gary P. Hansen
ENGINEERING DRAFTING SERVICES


Re: Turning Troubles

JC Johnson <two-jays@...>
 

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2003 14:12:38 -0000
From: "Allen Burr" <aburr@notes.tcs.treas.gov>
Subject: Re: Turning Troubles

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "jem1043" <millermohr@w...>
wrote:
I am not very experienced at machining and I have a problem with
turning a outside diameter with my South Bend 9" lathe.
I have turned the gibs so tight that it is not easy to turn the
dials
but I still get gouges in a cylinder that I am trying to get to a
specific diameter.
Also, if I power feed towards the headstock and then power feed
toward
the tail stock the cutter removes material in both directions?
I generally use the rocker tool mount and I have used cutting tools
that are HSS, the "tangential tool" and carbide tipped tools. The
tangential cutting tool seems to give me the best control and
finish.
I have tried moving the cross slide towards the back of the lathe
and
then towards me to remove as much "play" as possible and that seems
to
be the best. But what a pain to find a place to get the tool closer
to
the turning center line and then move it back to the setting I need
to
turn.
Maybe this lathe is just worn out. I don't use it much but I would
like to be able to use it when I need it.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
John
John: What material are you trying to cut? Try changing the feed and
speed rate, usually the harder materials will give a cleaner cut at
slower speeds. The power feed on my 9" I only use for thread cutting.
I've found that the cleanest cuts are obtained by hand feeding the
carrage. Cutting fluid can sometimes help depending on the material.
5000 and 6000 series aluminum likes denatured alcohol steel cuts best
with water soluable oil (milk) cast iron brass and stainlessI cut dry.
Allen, denatured alcohol gives me an enormous headache, but have found
kerosene to give me good results cutting aluminum.

Johnny


Re: Shop tip of the day!

Gene <capper@...>
 

What is the cure for a broken tap in aluminum?

Dave Mucha wrote:


--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Jon Rolfe <southbend@g...>
wrote:
At 12:02 AM 6/25/2003 +0000, you wrote:
Here is another tip. If you break a hss tap, save the big parts
and
grind them for bits for your boring bars.

OK, and if you break it off in Stainless, overnight in nitric acid
will
save the day. Next morning, black sludge and small black chips can
be
flushed out.
Never mind how I know. An ultrasonic cleaner speeds the process a
lot.

I'm drawing a blank on the acid, but there is also a common one that
works when you break a tap in aluminum.

Dave


--
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Re: Shop tip of the day!

Stan Stocker <skstocker@...>
 

Hi Dave,

Not an acid, hot saturated solution of alum in water. As noted, only works for aluminum, it eats steels.

There may well be an acid that doesn't bother aluminum but eats steel, for some reason I'm thinking HCl, but wouldn't want to swear to it.

Cheers,
Stan

Dave Mucha wrote:
<snip>

I'm drawing a blank on the acid, but there is also a common one that works when you break a tap in aluminum.
Dave


Belts

jcp2627 <catvet@...>
 

I have made a new bench for my 9", and I'm going to replace the belt
when I mount the lathe to it. I think I would like leather this time
and found it available at several places. I have Clipper lacing at
the shop, but I would like to try a glued splice. Any suggestions on
what cement to use?
Jim Platt


Re: Shop tip of the day!

Dave Mucha <davemucha@...>
 

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Jon Rolfe <southbend@g...>
wrote:
At 12:02 AM 6/25/2003 +0000, you wrote:
Here is another tip. If you break a hss tap, save the big parts
and
grind them for bits for your boring bars.

OK, and if you break it off in Stainless, overnight in nitric acid
will
save the day. Next morning, black sludge and small black chips can
be
flushed out.
Never mind how I know. An ultrasonic cleaner speeds the process a
lot.


I'm drawing a blank on the acid, but there is also a common one that
works when you break a tap in aluminum.

Dave


Re: Shop tip of the day!

Jon Rolfe <southbend@...>
 

At 12:02 AM 6/25/2003 +0000, you wrote:
Here is another tip. If you break a hss tap, save the big parts and
grind them for bits for your boring bars.

OK, and if you break it off in Stainless, overnight in nitric acid will save the day. Next morning, black sludge and small black chips can be flushed out.
Never mind how I know. An ultrasonic cleaner speeds the process a lot.


Shop tip of the day!

garyphansen
 

We have all been guilty of not cleaning a paint bursh good enough and
having it turn stiff and useless for painting. When this happens I
often cut the bristels down to a inch or half an inch with tin
snipps. They make great chip brushes!

Here is another tip. If you break a hss tap, save the big parts and
grind them for bits for your boring bars.

Gary P. Hansen
ENGINEERING DRAFTING SERVICES


Re: Gear Chart Plates

Clint D <driggars@...>
 

Eric
here is a link to an ebay listing he has, email him and let him know that
you heard about them on the SB group
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2540857517&category=1272&
rd=1

Clint

----- Original Message -----
From: "n5xq" <n5xq@yahoo.com>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, June 24, 2003 7:17 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Gear Chart Plates



Clint,

How do we get in touch with Randy to purchase one of these?

Thanks,

Eric




--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Clint D" <driggars@e...>
wrote:
I just wanted to remind everyone that Randy Phillips has the new
Gear Chart
Plates available for the SB lathes, I purchased one a while back
and I
cannot tell any difference from the originals, nice item for those
that are
restoring

Clint


--
Web: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
More pix: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SouthBendLathePix/
Newbie guide: http://smaa.techwood.net/SBL/Newbie.pdf
FAQ: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sblinfo/files/SouthBendLatheFAQ.html
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Re: Turning Troubles

terranovapress@...
 

Unless you take very small cuts, the stock may indeed flex and you might try a follower rest. First try taking a cut of maybe .005 and using a good sulfated cutting oil and see what happens. also make certain you have lubed the dead center.

Frank


All:
Thanks for all the comments.
I was turning a .5 inch diameter steel rod that was about 5 inches
long. One end was in a 3 jaw chuck with the other by a "dead center"
in the tail stock.
The tool might have been at the wrong height, but it was aligned
by eye with the "dead center" which had been aligned with a center in
the head stock. One of the tools I was using was a brand new
indexable
carbide with a 7 degree clearance angle. Another was the "diamond
tool", which gave better results.
Which case would cause the tool bit to "dig in" more. The tool above
center or below?


Re: Turning Troubles

gorvil
 

John,

I have sometimes had the work piece try to "climb" the tool when it
is mounted below center line. In effect the tool pulls the workpiece
into itself. This is more pronounced when there is a lot of overhang
as in a rocker style toolpost.

The angle of the tool to the work should be set up so that the forces
tend to push the tool away from the work, rather than pulling it in.
I think there is a discussion of this in How To Run a Lathe.


Glen Reeser



--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "jem1043" <millermohr@w...>
wrote:
--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "jem1043" <millermohr@w...>
wrote:
I am not very experienced at machining and I have a problem with
turning a outside diameter with my South Bend 9" lathe.
I have turned the gibs so tight that it is not easy to turn the
dials
but I still get gouges in a cylinder that I am trying to get to a
specific diameter.
Also, if I power feed towards the headstock and then power feed
toward
the tail stock the cutter removes material in both directions?
I generally use the rocker tool mount and I have used cutting
tools
that are HSS, the "tangential tool" and carbide tipped tools. The
tangential cutting tool seems to give me the best control and
finish.
I have tried moving the cross slide towards the back of the lathe
and
then towards me to remove as much "play" as possible and that
seems
to
be the best. But what a pain to find a place to get the tool
closer
to
the turning center line and then move it back to the setting I
need
to
turn.
Maybe this lathe is just worn out. I don't use it much but I
would
like to be able to use it when I need it.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
John

All:
Thanks for all the comments.
I was turning a .5 inch diameter steel rod that was about 5 inches
long. One end was in a 3 jaw chuck with the other by a "dead
center"
in the tail stock.
The tool might have been at the wrong height, but it was aligned
by eye with the "dead center" which had been aligned with a center
in
the head stock. One of the tools I was using was a brand new
indexable
carbide with a 7 degree clearance angle. Another was the "diamond
tool", which gave better results.
Which case would cause the tool bit to "dig in" more. The tool
above
center or below?


Re: Turning Troubles

Thomas G Brandl
 

Basically neither is good. I would say tool below center line is the lesser
of two evils. The tool above would cause more problems of the tool digging
in. The aligning with the dead center should be correct tool height.
Smaller diameter work pieces are more critical of tool hieght, but 1/2
diameter isn't too finicky. I don't know if it was mentioned before, but
check tool over hang. I think you are using a rocker type tool holder. Keep
the length of the holder as short as posible. ie closer as possible from
the cutting tip to the tool post. The rocker post is a bit more flexable or
less ridgid than other toolholders, still it is a good idea to keep this in
mind with other setups. With a rocker type, you are rotating the rocker up
or down to achieve center hiegth. This affects the tool clearance angles.
If to great, you need to shim up the tool holder to keep the tool
angle/geometry correct.
As too 1/2 stock, what type of steel is being cut? Check the spindle
play or clearance in the headstock. It is adjustable. Check this in the
tailstock. I don't know if you are turning between centers or with a chuck
and center. Not any real difference though. Are you using a diamond tipped
(CBN) insert or some brand called 'Diamond'?
Another thing to look at is the tool nose radius and depth of cut.
Different materials are better or worst for finish. You depth of cut should
be over twice the tool nose radius. This keep even load on the tool. Just
some thoughts. Hard to give good advice without seeing whats going on.
Tom




jem1043 <millermohr@worldnet.att.net> on 06/24/2003 08:20:25 AM

Please respond to southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com

To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
cc:
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Turning Troubles


--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "jem1043" <millermohr@w...>
wrote:
I am not very experienced at machining and I have a problem with
turning a outside diameter with my South Bend 9" lathe.
I have turned the gibs so tight that it is not easy to turn the
dials
but I still get gouges in a cylinder that I am trying to get to a
specific diameter.
Also, if I power feed towards the headstock and then power feed
toward
the tail stock the cutter removes material in both directions?
I generally use the rocker tool mount and I have used cutting tools
that are HSS, the "tangential tool" and carbide tipped tools. The
tangential cutting tool seems to give me the best control and
finish.
I have tried moving the cross slide towards the back of the lathe
and
then towards me to remove as much "play" as possible and that seems
to
be the best. But what a pain to find a place to get the tool closer
to
the turning center line and then move it back to the setting I need
to
turn.
Maybe this lathe is just worn out. I don't use it much but I would
like to be able to use it when I need it.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
John

All:
Thanks for all the comments.
I was turning a .5 inch diameter steel rod that was about 5 inches
long. One end was in a 3 jaw chuck with the other by a "dead center"
in the tail stock.
The tool might have been at the wrong height, but it was aligned
by eye with the "dead center" which had been aligned with a center in
the head stock. One of the tools I was using was a brand new
indexable
carbide with a 7 degree clearance angle. Another was the "diamond
tool", which gave better results.
Which case would cause the tool bit to "dig in" more. The tool above
center or below?



--
Web: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
More pix: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SouthBendLathePix/
Newbie guide: http://smaa.techwood.net/SBL/Newbie.pdf
FAQ: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sblinfo/files/SouthBendLatheFAQ.html
Post: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Email Moderators: southbendlathe-owner@yahoogroups.com
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Re: Turning Troubles

jem1043 <millermohr@...>
 

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "jem1043" <millermohr@w...>
wrote:
I am not very experienced at machining and I have a problem with
turning a outside diameter with my South Bend 9" lathe.
I have turned the gibs so tight that it is not easy to turn the
dials
but I still get gouges in a cylinder that I am trying to get to a
specific diameter.
Also, if I power feed towards the headstock and then power feed
toward
the tail stock the cutter removes material in both directions?
I generally use the rocker tool mount and I have used cutting tools
that are HSS, the "tangential tool" and carbide tipped tools. The
tangential cutting tool seems to give me the best control and
finish.
I have tried moving the cross slide towards the back of the lathe
and
then towards me to remove as much "play" as possible and that seems
to
be the best. But what a pain to find a place to get the tool closer
to
the turning center line and then move it back to the setting I need
to
turn.
Maybe this lathe is just worn out. I don't use it much but I would
like to be able to use it when I need it.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
John

All:
Thanks for all the comments.
I was turning a .5 inch diameter steel rod that was about 5 inches
long. One end was in a 3 jaw chuck with the other by a "dead center"
in the tail stock.
The tool might have been at the wrong height, but it was aligned
by eye with the "dead center" which had been aligned with a center in
the head stock. One of the tools I was using was a brand new
indexable
carbide with a 7 degree clearance angle. Another was the "diamond
tool", which gave better results.
Which case would cause the tool bit to "dig in" more. The tool above
center or below?


Re: For Rose (Sorry, but I gotta ask)

Rose Marvin <rmarvin@...>
 

John-
It would not have been South Bend's website. The serial numbers that
consists of just numbers from 700-186000+ are numbered sequentially. When
South Bend started coded the serial numbers in the 40's they used letter
designations for the size of the lathe. That information can be found on
their website.

Thanks,
Rose Marvin
LeBlond Ltd
rmarvin@leblondusa.com

-----Original Message-----
From: J.T.Toner [SMTP:jttoner@hotmail.com]
Sent: Monday, June 23, 2003 9:46 PM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: For Rose (Sorry, but I gotta ask)

<< File: ATT00012.html >>

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