Date   

Re: Carbide - Surface Finish - 9A

Bill in OKC too
 

When I got my first lathe, an HF 7x10, all I could afford was the cheap brazed carbide they sold, and it was definitely crap. The chips of carbide were not ground at all, and the they were brazed on blanks that presented the bottom edge of the carbide chip out in front of the top (should be cutting) edge. Everyone said you needed silicon carbide (green) grinding wheels to reshape them to be usable, but I was able to do it on an alox (gray) wheel. Still not the greatest tooling, but better than when I bought them. However, my 7x10 was not sufficient machine to use them, and I wasn't sufficiently good at machining to get any usable work out of them. Something about not being able to measure accurately... ;)

I still have them here somewhere, may try them on the Atlas if I can manage to finish setting up the shop. I had my 2nd cataract surgery Tuesday, can't lift more than 10lbs, not allowed to bend 90 degrees at the waist, and not supposed to do anything like normal activities for at least a week. Good news, though, is that I can see well enough to drive and read with my old glasses. I'll get a new prescription in about 2 weeks, but no shop time for the next week, so I don't really need the new glasses. And I can read micrometers and calipers just fine as is! 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 10:34:23 AM CDT, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:


I've had better luck using sharp, positive rake inserts intended for aluminum, even on steel. I've not found the negative rake or brazed carbide to be useful on a light lathe.


On Wed, Jul 13, 2022, 10:46 PM Mike Poore <mpoore10@...> wrote:
I am sure this is not the first time for this topic, but I'd like to know what setup, if any, anyone has found that provides a good surface finish using carbide on 1018?

I have acquired a lot of carbide inserts and holders along with my QCTP. I have negative rake and no rake holders. I have chipbreakers and flat carbide. I turned some aluminum after rebuilding the lathe and the surface finish was as good as one could expect so far as it was nearly a mirror finish using the slowest feed. Then I tried 1018 with the same tooling and ended up with a fairly rough finish. It looked and felt like the metal was tearing rather than cutting. I have tried other combos and nothing yet is satisfactory. I have a diamond disc sharpener, but I think the carbide is sharp enough to do better than it is. There is plenty of HSS laying around that could be used, but the idea of indexable carbide would be preferred if I can make it work.

There is plenty of experimenting left to do. I was hoping someone could give me a starting point as far as insert shape, rake, speeds (I am guessing it might be a little different than what the book says for an old WWII cast iron bearing lathe.), and tool angle. Thanks for any help.


Re: Carbide - Surface Finish - 9A

Ondrej Krejci <okrejci@...>
 

Greetings,

The theory behind cutting with carbide is that it tears instead of shears, the exclusion being polished positive rake inserts used mostly for aluminium.

And so, higher speeds lead to lower tool tip pressures and better finishes; hence, finishers have small nose radii.

You may want to check the grades of carbide you are using if possible.  There are various charts on the web.


Best of Luck,

OK


Re: Carbide - Surface Finish - 9A

m. allan noah
 

I've had better luck using sharp, positive rake inserts intended for aluminum, even on steel. I've not found the negative rake or brazed carbide to be useful on a light lathe.


On Wed, Jul 13, 2022, 10:46 PM Mike Poore <mpoore10@...> wrote:
I am sure this is not the first time for this topic, but I'd like to know what setup, if any, anyone has found that provides a good surface finish using carbide on 1018?

I have acquired a lot of carbide inserts and holders along with my QCTP. I have negative rake and no rake holders. I have chipbreakers and flat carbide. I turned some aluminum after rebuilding the lathe and the surface finish was as good as one could expect so far as it was nearly a mirror finish using the slowest feed. Then I tried 1018 with the same tooling and ended up with a fairly rough finish. It looked and felt like the metal was tearing rather than cutting. I have tried other combos and nothing yet is satisfactory. I have a diamond disc sharpener, but I think the carbide is sharp enough to do better than it is. There is plenty of HSS laying around that could be used, but the idea of indexable carbide would be preferred if I can make it work.

There is plenty of experimenting left to do. I was hoping someone could give me a starting point as far as insert shape, rake, speeds (I am guessing it might be a little different than what the book says for an old WWII cast iron bearing lathe.), and tool angle. Thanks for any help.


Re: Carbide - Surface Finish - 9A

Bill in OKC too
 

I understand your concern! It depends on what you have. Some carbide is made a bit sharper than other carbide, but carbide is granules of very high-carbon material in a softer metal binder. The granules are usually some sort of crystal, so they may have sharp edges, but those don't necessarily present at the cutting edge of the tool. Grinders that are made for sharpening carbide tooling usually have diamond grinding wheels, but they may not be the finest grain. 

Personally, I use an Eze-Lap Super fine diamond hone on my HSS cutters, and cheap chinese import carbide inserts in cheap insert holders, so haven't worried about honing them. My home machines aren't large or heavy enough to take best advantage of carbide tooling. Your 9A is probably a better machine than my 10" TH42, but neither of them are super stiff. 

If you have a 10X loupe or magnifier, you can look at the edges and select inserts that seem to be sharper for your finish work. Carbide is mostly used in production shops to get maximum productivity in minimum time on heavy machines. You won't be able to take full advantage of it on the lighter machines, but you can do good work within the limits of machine. 

There are different grades and materials used in the inserts that work better for certain materials, and if you can identify what you have you can take advantage of those differences, but if they they're unmarked you'll just have to guess, and hope it works out. Carbidedepot.com used to have some really good info on selecting carbide inserts, but their site doesn't seem to be working anymore in the Brave browser I'm using now. Comes up fine in MS Edge, so you might want to check it out. 

There is a grade of carbide insert for aluminum, and if you use it on cast iron or tool steel it might not work well, might chip badly, etc. One of the guys I was watching on youtube recently had a bunch of that stuff and was using it for everything he did, but he had to play with feeds and speeds to get it to work on the material he was using, which was mostly not aluminum. Wish I could remember who it was... Finding it might help you out. Best of luck to you, and hope this helps you.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 10:02:52 AM CDT, Mike Poore <mpoore10@...> wrote:


Ideally, I'd like to be able to use one tool to take a heavy cut followed by an acceptable finishing cut. Is that possible with carbide on a 9A?

You and Ondrej recommend 400-600 sfpm with carbide. I take it carbide cuts better at a faster sfpm? Maybe I misunderstood carbide usage. I thought it was capable of faster cutting, but faster cutting was not essential for a good cut. I know the speed effects the chipbreaking, but I did not know slower cutting will actually make the finish worse. So will cutting at a lower sfpm lead to the tearing finish that I wrote about originally?

I have about 100# of various carbide inserts, so I'd really like to find something I can use rather than buying something else.

Mike

On 7/14/2022 10:10 AM, Bill in OKC too via groups.io wrote:
I'm afraid that you need a much sturdier/more massive lathe than the lighter SB lathes. My experience is with Clausing-Colchester 13 & 15 inch school lathes. The smaller 13" lathe weighs about 2700 pounds, the 15" lathes about 3800lbs. My Heavy 10L weighs just over a third of what the smaller CC lathe weighed and about has to be a great deal less stiff. Mild steel, in our class was specified 90SFPM for HSS, and 400SFPM for carbide tooling. I could get a mirror finish on the 13" lathe. I've not gotten to use my SB yet, just the Atlas. It's about a quarter the weight of the SB. Pretty much spaghetti comparatively. Unless your SB is one of the newer lathes and a 14" or larger you're going to need slower speeds and feeds, and shallower cuts to make up for the lesser stiffness. 

You could use carbide for roughing cuts, and HSS for finish cuts if you really need or want the fine finish. You can diamond hone HSS & carbide if you need it sharper, but that can mess up your repeatability with indexable inserts. 

Arwarnerco.com sells HSS indexable inserts which the folks who use 7x mini-lathes a lot seem to find very helpful. LittleMachineShop.com sells the smaller sizes appropriate for the 7" and similar machines, and in smaller quantities IIRC.

HTH!

Bill in OKC 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Wednesday, July 13, 2022 at 09:46:54 PM CDT, Mike Poore <mpoore10@...> wrote:


I am sure this is not the first time for this topic, but I'd like to know what setup, if any, anyone has found that provides a good surface finish using carbide on 1018?

I have acquired a lot of carbide inserts and holders along with my QCTP. I have negative rake and no rake holders. I have chipbreakers and flat carbide. I turned some aluminum after rebuilding the lathe and the surface finish was as good as one could expect so far as it was nearly a mirror finish using the slowest feed. Then I tried 1018 with the same tooling and ended up with a fairly rough finish. It looked and felt like the metal was tearing rather than cutting. I have tried other combos and nothing yet is satisfactory. I have a diamond disc sharpener, but I think the carbide is sharp enough to do better than it is. There is plenty of HSS laying around that could be used, but the idea of indexable carbide would be preferred if I can make it work.

There is plenty of experimenting left to do. I was hoping someone could give me a starting point as far as insert shape, rake, speeds (I am guessing it might be a little different than what the book says for an old WWII cast iron bearing lathe.), and tool angle. Thanks for any help.


Re: Carbide - Surface Finish - 9A

Mike Poore
 

Ideally, I'd like to be able to use one tool to take a heavy cut followed by an acceptable finishing cut. Is that possible with carbide on a 9A?

You and Ondrej recommend 400-600 sfpm with carbide. I take it carbide cuts better at a faster sfpm? Maybe I misunderstood carbide usage. I thought it was capable of faster cutting, but faster cutting was not essential for a good cut. I know the speed effects the chipbreaking, but I did not know slower cutting will actually make the finish worse. So will cutting at a lower sfpm lead to the tearing finish that I wrote about originally?

I have about 100# of various carbide inserts, so I'd really like to find something I can use rather than buying something else.

Mike

On 7/14/2022 10:10 AM, Bill in OKC too via groups.io wrote:

I'm afraid that you need a much sturdier/more massive lathe than the lighter SB lathes. My experience is with Clausing-Colchester 13 & 15 inch school lathes. The smaller 13" lathe weighs about 2700 pounds, the 15" lathes about 3800lbs. My Heavy 10L weighs just over a third of what the smaller CC lathe weighed and about has to be a great deal less stiff. Mild steel, in our class was specified 90SFPM for HSS, and 400SFPM for carbide tooling. I could get a mirror finish on the 13" lathe. I've not gotten to use my SB yet, just the Atlas. It's about a quarter the weight of the SB. Pretty much spaghetti comparatively. Unless your SB is one of the newer lathes and a 14" or larger you're going to need slower speeds and feeds, and shallower cuts to make up for the lesser stiffness. 

You could use carbide for roughing cuts, and HSS for finish cuts if you really need or want the fine finish. You can diamond hone HSS & carbide if you need it sharper, but that can mess up your repeatability with indexable inserts. 

Arwarnerco.com sells HSS indexable inserts which the folks who use 7x mini-lathes a lot seem to find very helpful. LittleMachineShop.com sells the smaller sizes appropriate for the 7" and similar machines, and in smaller quantities IIRC.

HTH!

Bill in OKC 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Wednesday, July 13, 2022 at 09:46:54 PM CDT, Mike Poore <mpoore10@...> wrote:


I am sure this is not the first time for this topic, but I'd like to know what setup, if any, anyone has found that provides a good surface finish using carbide on 1018?

I have acquired a lot of carbide inserts and holders along with my QCTP. I have negative rake and no rake holders. I have chipbreakers and flat carbide. I turned some aluminum after rebuilding the lathe and the surface finish was as good as one could expect so far as it was nearly a mirror finish using the slowest feed. Then I tried 1018 with the same tooling and ended up with a fairly rough finish. It looked and felt like the metal was tearing rather than cutting. I have tried other combos and nothing yet is satisfactory. I have a diamond disc sharpener, but I think the carbide is sharp enough to do better than it is. There is plenty of HSS laying around that could be used, but the idea of indexable carbide would be preferred if I can make it work.

There is plenty of experimenting left to do. I was hoping someone could give me a starting point as far as insert shape, rake, speeds (I am guessing it might be a little different than what the book says for an old WWII cast iron bearing lathe.), and tool angle. Thanks for any help.


Re: Carbide - Surface Finish - 9A

Bill in OKC too
 

I'm afraid that you need a much sturdier/more massive lathe than the lighter SB lathes. My experience is with Clausing-Colchester 13 & 15 inch school lathes. The smaller 13" lathe weighs about 2700 pounds, the 15" lathes about 3800lbs. My Heavy 10L weighs just over a third of what the smaller CC lathe weighed and about has to be a great deal less stiff. Mild steel, in our class was specified 90SFPM for HSS, and 400SFPM for carbide tooling. I could get a mirror finish on the 13" lathe. I've not gotten to use my SB yet, just the Atlas. It's about a quarter the weight of the SB. Pretty much spaghetti comparatively. Unless your SB is one of the newer lathes and a 14" or larger you're going to need slower speeds and feeds, and shallower cuts to make up for the lesser stiffness. 

You could use carbide for roughing cuts, and HSS for finish cuts if you really need or want the fine finish. You can diamond hone HSS & carbide if you need it sharper, but that can mess up your repeatability with indexable inserts. 

Arwarnerco.com sells HSS indexable inserts which the folks who use 7x mini-lathes a lot seem to find very helpful. LittleMachineShop.com sells the smaller sizes appropriate for the 7" and similar machines, and in smaller quantities IIRC.

HTH!

Bill in OKC 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Wednesday, July 13, 2022 at 09:46:54 PM CDT, Mike Poore <mpoore10@...> wrote:


I am sure this is not the first time for this topic, but I'd like to know what setup, if any, anyone has found that provides a good surface finish using carbide on 1018?

I have acquired a lot of carbide inserts and holders along with my QCTP. I have negative rake and no rake holders. I have chipbreakers and flat carbide. I turned some aluminum after rebuilding the lathe and the surface finish was as good as one could expect so far as it was nearly a mirror finish using the slowest feed. Then I tried 1018 with the same tooling and ended up with a fairly rough finish. It looked and felt like the metal was tearing rather than cutting. I have tried other combos and nothing yet is satisfactory. I have a diamond disc sharpener, but I think the carbide is sharp enough to do better than it is. There is plenty of HSS laying around that could be used, but the idea of indexable carbide would be preferred if I can make it work.

There is plenty of experimenting left to do. I was hoping someone could give me a starting point as far as insert shape, rake, speeds (I am guessing it might be a little different than what the book says for an old WWII cast iron bearing lathe.), and tool angle. Thanks for any help.


Re: Carbide - Surface Finish - 9A

Ondrej Krejci <okrejci@...>
 

Hello,

With finishing inserts, usually D or 55 degree tip, and 0.005" to 0.010" tool nose radius, about 600sfm and 0.004" to 0.008" feed/rev. work well on 10 series steels.

OK

On Wednesday, July 13, 2022 at 10:46:53 PM EDT, Mike Poore <mpoore10@...> wrote:


I am sure this is not the first time for this topic, but I'd like to know what setup, if any, anyone has found that provides a good surface finish using carbide on 1018?

I have acquired a lot of carbide inserts and holders along with my QCTP. I have negative rake and no rake holders. I have chipbreakers and flat carbide. I turned some aluminum after rebuilding the lathe and the surface finish was as good as one could expect so far as it was nearly a mirror finish using the slowest feed. Then I tried 1018 with the same tooling and ended up with a fairly rough finish. It looked and felt like the metal was tearing rather than cutting. I have tried other combos and nothing yet is satisfactory. I have a diamond disc sharpener, but I think the carbide is sharp enough to do better than it is. There is plenty of HSS laying around that could be used, but the idea of indexable carbide would be preferred if I can make it work.

There is plenty of experimenting left to do. I was hoping someone could give me a starting point as far as insert shape, rake, speeds (I am guessing it might be a little different than what the book says for an old WWII cast iron bearing lathe.), and tool angle. Thanks for any help.


Carbide - Surface Finish - 9A

Mike Poore
 

I am sure this is not the first time for this topic, but I'd like to know what setup, if any, anyone has found that provides a good surface finish using carbide on 1018?

I have acquired a lot of carbide inserts and holders along with my QCTP. I have negative rake and no rake holders. I have chipbreakers and flat carbide. I turned some aluminum after rebuilding the lathe and the surface finish was as good as one could expect so far as it was nearly a mirror finish using the slowest feed. Then I tried 1018 with the same tooling and ended up with a fairly rough finish. It looked and felt like the metal was tearing rather than cutting. I have tried other combos and nothing yet is satisfactory. I have a diamond disc sharpener, but I think the carbide is sharp enough to do better than it is. There is plenty of HSS laying around that could be used, but the idea of indexable carbide would be preferred if I can make it work.

There is plenty of experimenting left to do. I was hoping someone could give me a starting point as far as insert shape, rake, speeds (I am guessing it might be a little different than what the book says for an old WWII cast iron bearing lathe.), and tool angle. Thanks for any help.


Re: Two and Three Point Steadies

tgerbic
 

That was a really great idea. Perhaps strengthening the attach point on the lathe would make it much heavier duty without other reinforcement.


Re: Two and Three Point Steadies

Ray De Jong
 

Real world 'recycling', gotta save that metal. Very nice warkon bothe the steady rest and thread dial. I love it!


On Sunday, July 10, 2022, 04:48:22 AM PDT, George Meinschein via groups.io <gmeinschein@...> wrote:


Nice work!


Thanks, George Meinschein 150 Brittany Drive Freehold, NJ 07728 gmeinschein@... Cell#: 732-580-1736

Sent from Proton Mail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Jul 10, 2022, 4:02 AM, davetryner via groups.io < davetryner@...> wrote:

I've had a large 10" pulley in the workshop for some years and thought that it could be turned into a 3 point fixed steady by removing the central boss and taking 120' arc from the disc to form the top part of the 3 point steady. The bottom of the disc to be shaped to suit the bed slideway. Guides were made to slide in grooves in the disc 120' apart. I later added small bearings on each guide to limit the friction when in use. It works quite well for small jobs - probably not as good as the robust 3 point steady on the market - but ok for occasional use. It's at that point that I realised that by not using the top section and re-positioning the steady on the saddle I could use it as a 2 point moving steady. Some time required shaping the pulley to suit the curvature of the saddle casting but it seems to do the job and it's nice to use the old pulley for two purposes. The photos attached show the stages of manufacture.
Oh, and what happened to the boss removed from the centre of the pulley, you may ask? I used it for the housing of thread cutting dial - see photo
--
-George M.


Re: Two and Three Point Steadies

George Meinschein
 

Nice work!


Thanks, George Meinschein 150 Brittany Drive Freehold, NJ 07728 gmeinschein@... Cell#: 732-580-1736

Sent from Proton Mail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Jul 10, 2022, 4:02 AM, davetryner via groups.io < davetryner@...> wrote:

I've had a large 10" pulley in the workshop for some years and thought that it could be turned into a 3 point fixed steady by removing the central boss and taking 120' arc from the disc to form the top part of the 3 point steady. The bottom of the disc to be shaped to suit the bed slideway. Guides were made to slide in grooves in the disc 120' apart. I later added small bearings on each guide to limit the friction when in use. It works quite well for small jobs - probably not as good as the robust 3 point steady on the market - but ok for occasional use. It's at that point that I realised that by not using the top section and re-positioning the steady on the saddle I could use it as a 2 point moving steady. Some time required shaping the pulley to suit the curvature of the saddle casting but it seems to do the job and it's nice to use the old pulley for two purposes. The photos attached show the stages of manufacture.
Oh, and what happened to the boss removed from the centre of the pulley, you may ask? I used it for the housing of thread cutting dial - see photo
--
-George M.


Two and Three Point Steadies

davetryner@...
 

I've had a large 10" pulley in the workshop for some years and thought that it could be turned into a 3 point fixed steady by removing the central boss and taking 120' arc from the disc to form the top part of the 3 point steady. The bottom of the disc to be shaped to suit the bed slideway. Guides were made to slide in grooves in the disc 120' apart. I later added small bearings on each guide to limit the friction when in use. It works quite well for small jobs - probably not as good as the robust 3 point steady on the market - but ok for occasional use. It's at that point that I realised that by not using the top section and re-positioning the steady on the saddle I could use it as a 2 point moving steady. Some time required shaping the pulley to suit the curvature of the saddle casting but it seems to do the job and it's nice to use the old pulley for two purposes. The photos attached show the stages of manufacture.
Oh, and what happened to the boss removed from the centre of the pulley, you may ask? I used it for the housing of thread cutting dial - see photo


Re: Cradle Shaft Removal

sapark123321
 

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/forum/threads/how-do-i-remove-the-cradle-shaft.160637/


Re: Cradle Shaft Removal

Todd
 

If date correct restoration is not required, remove the babbit and replace with a bronze flange bushing. I believe my 1956  14-1/2 has a flange bushing instead of babbit

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
Get Outlook for Android

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of ww_big_al <arknack@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 30, 2022 7:42:03 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Cradle Shaft Removal
 

Hope the old girl is salvageable. I can’t answer your questions but Keith Ruker has several YouTube videos on how to pour babbitt.

https://www.youtube.com/c/KeithRuckerVintageMachineryorg/search?query=babbit

 

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Cregg
Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2022 10:11 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Cradle Shaft Removal

 

Hello 

I have 1948 South Bend lathe 14-1/2" x 7' that is damaged due to a fire. The lathe was next to a house that burned down. The babbitt has melted and started to run out of the cabinet leg.

My question is how do you remove cradle shaft assuming no damage?  

Has anyone in this re-poured the babbitt that the cradle shaft slides into? If so, can you give written and/or photo instructions?

Any assistance is greatly appreciated
--
Cregg


Re: Cradle Shaft Removal

ww_big_al
 

Hope the old girl is salvageable. I can’t answer your questions but Keith Ruker has several YouTube videos on how to pour babbitt.

https://www.youtube.com/c/KeithRuckerVintageMachineryorg/search?query=babbit

 

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Cregg
Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2022 10:11 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Cradle Shaft Removal

 

Hello 

I have 1948 South Bend lathe 14-1/2" x 7' that is damaged due to a fire. The lathe was next to a house that burned down. The babbitt has melted and started to run out of the cabinet leg.

My question is how do you remove cradle shaft assuming no damage?  

Has anyone in this re-poured the babbitt that the cradle shaft slides into? If so, can you give written and/or photo instructions?

Any assistance is greatly appreciated
--
Cregg


Cradle Shaft Removal

Cregg
 

Hello 

I have 1948 South Bend lathe 14-1/2" x 7' that is damaged due to a fire. The lathe was next to a house that burned down. The babbitt has melted and started to run out of the cabinet leg.

My question is how do you remove cradle shaft assuming no damage?  

Has anyone in this re-poured the babbitt that the cradle shaft slides into? If so, can you give written and/or photo instructions?

Any assistance is greatly appreciated
--
Cregg


Re: What type of tool holder is this?

tgerbic
 

It looks like a professional made holder and it has some wear on it from use.  Since it does not appear to be a standard lathe or mill tool holder/collet tool, I suspect it fits some spin indexer or tool grinder device. It came with a bunch of machines and tooling from a long time journeyman machinist from the 50s to 70s era, so it is pretty old. Though I still have a lot of his old machine shop tools and equipment, it does not fit anything I still have.

Would be nice to figure out what this fits in case it is a hard to find item for some persons equipment.

Tony


Re: What type of tool holder is this?

mike allen
 

        looks & sounds like a end mill holder with the taper/ slot. threaded hole for a drawbar . Here's a pretty good list that may have a match for what ya got .

        https://littlemachineshop.com/reference/tapers.php

        animal

On 6/28/2022 8:55 PM, tgerbic wrote:

I am trying to organize my lathe/mill tools and came across this tool holder in a box of older tool holders I purchased decades ago. I don't seem to be able to identify the type and what it was used on.  At first glance it looks a bit like an R8 but physically not the same.  Anyone know what type it is?
No application for my SB9 or any of the fixtures/tooling for it. My vert mill is R8 and my horiz mill is one of the Atlas MFCs.

It is 4" long and the big end is 1.45" dia with a 1/2" hole in it. I assume for a 1/2" inch shank milling cutter.
The big end of the taper is 1.18".
The draw bar is 1/2-13.
The outer threads are 7/8-24.
The shaft is 0.8" dia and 3" long to edge of taper.






Re: Cleaning files fouled by aluminum

mike allen
 

Not sure where you live , but Gryphon Stringed
Instruments ( the place that Frank Ford , the guy mentioned earlier in
this thread started & still runs ) will give you a good honest

            price for it or a appraisal . In my case it's mostly the
work of a DR  that has almost stopped my playing along with 30 years as
a electrician distorting my fingers . But then I'll spin

            some Django & listen to what he could do with two fingers &
say I'll give it another try .

            https://www.gryphonstrings.com/

            animal

On 6/29/2022 6:19 AM, Nick Jonkman wrote:

Back around 1987 I bought a Martin D28 guitar kit from St. Croix Kits
now Music Makers for $299.95. Martin was selling kits of unfinished
guitars that were supposed to be seconds with some slight blemish.
Mine came with a note that said no blemish. I bought this just after
my first wife had past away from cancer in 1986 and this project kinda
kept me occupied and got me back to living again. I played it for many
years . I also have a Gibson J50, a 1953 vintage.  Now at 80 years my
fingers don't work so well any more. One of these days I am going to
have to sell them as none of my family is interested in them.
Nick


On 2022-06-29 12:23 a.m., mike allen wrote:

        Anybody can learn to play the guitar . Can they be any good
at it ? Well that's up to them . I had a DR get inside of my hand &
screw up a finger . I'm still sitting on several guitars worth some

        good $ thinking one day my hand will work right again . I
have several friends with Martins , some can play them & some just
have Martins . Myself I have never liked the way a Martin sounds

        when I played one . I had a pretty nice Gibson L5 that
sounded great  that I left at a aunts house at the wrong time & she
tossed it . She is no longer my aunt but I still don't have that
guitar .

        animal






Re: What type of tool holder is this?

houdini
 

go to       lathe collet sizes chart  on google , u can do the same for the mill

On Wednesday, June 29, 2022 at 07:10:25 AM EDT, tgerbic <tgerbic@...> wrote:


I am trying to organize my lathe/mill tools and came across this tool holder in a box of older tool holders I purchased decades ago. I don't seem to be able to identify the type and what it was used on.  At first glance it looks a bit like an R8 but physically not the same.  Anyone know what type it is?
No application for my SB9 or any of the fixtures/tooling for it. My vert mill is R8 and my horiz mill is one of the Atlas MFCs.

It is 4" long and the big end is 1.45" dia with a 1/2" hole in it. I assume for a 1/2" inch shank milling cutter.
The big end of the taper is 1.18".
The draw bar is 1/2-13.
The outer threads are 7/8-24.
The shaft is 0.8" dia and 3" long to edge of taper.





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