Date   

Re: 9" Tapering Attachment

david pennington
 

Here are a couple of shots of mine on a 9C. I believe the installation is the same.

-------- Original message --------
From: "Tom Faust via groups.io" <TWFAUST@...>
Date: 10/10/21 19:59 (GMT-07:00)
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 9" Tapering Attachment

Quite a few years ago, I removed the tapering attachment from my Model A. I have decided to reinstall it for fear of parts "walking". It has been a lot of years, if anyone has a picture of one installed, I would appreciate it (time saver)


9" Tapering Attachment

Tom Faust
 

Quite a few years ago, I removed the tapering attachment from my Model A. I have decided to reinstall it for fear of parts "walking". It has been a lot of years, if anyone has a picture of one installed, I would appreciate it (time saver)


Re: Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

Roger Bickers
 

Steve,
I thought I saw a shifter knob but ruled it out as a reflection or color difference. 


Yeah milli.g that bottom flange..I almost did that once, left it to someone else and sold the lathe. Lol


On Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 11:53 AM, Steve Wells
<wswells@...> wrote:

I have OCD Roger…LOL, it’s a curse most of the time!

I can see the shifter knob peaking out just above the hand wheel.

Also I have a pristine 1935 405 bed that Turk send me a few years ago that I’ve slowly

been converting to a Model A. I’ve had to modify/mill the bed to accept the A-B apron, so

I’m familiar with the lower casting of the newer bed and the older ones. I can’t change the feet

without making an adaptor plate. I’m just going to leave the original feet on it and fill the

old casting hole for the wiring, although I’d really like to have the early 1947 intermediate style bed feet.

 

Steve

 

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Bickers via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, October 6, 2021 11:35 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

 

Damn Steve,  how'd you see those knobs for the feeds?  Must not be on a phone like I am. Lol

Roger

 

On Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 11:31 AM, Steve Wells

<wswells@...> wrote:

This is a Workshop Catalog number 477, 6-speed Model B, made between late 1939 and late 1945.

It has a keyed lead screw with an A-B apron, old style bed feet, bed mount switch with the wiring hole in the

left bed foot. Post the serial number for us for a more accurate ship date.

 

Steve

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Faust via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, October 6, 2021 7:52 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

 



Need help with ID. I'm thinking early 9", but could it be a "Junior". Sorry for bad pictures, a little crowded in there.


Re: turning hardened steel

Ondrej Krejci
 

Greetings,

The scrap stock would be turned up and left in the lathe.  That way it would be as concentric as possible when clamping the collet holder on it.
Carbide generally performs well at high speeds, but threading is done more slowly, even CNC lathes need lead in and out paths.
As for cutting depths, equal area has worked best for me; i.e. first pass at 0.015" to 0.010", then gradually down to 0.003" or 0.002" leaving 0.001" for finishing with a spring pass or air cut.

Best Wishes,


OK

On Wednesday, October 6, 2021, 11:35:09 AM EDT, William Nelson <wnnelson@...> wrote:


That was my plan with the scrap stock to get it as concentric as possible. Now the problem is taking light cuts with carbide. Carbide normally from what I've read want's high rpm and large feeds that wont work well in this situation. Will the micro grain carbide with a super sharp edge allow you to take light cuts? I have had very little opportunity to use carbide on the lathe and had mixed results. Putting the collet chuck in the 3 jaw chuck doesn't appear to give any benefit over just using the 3 jaw alone. The possibility of increased run out rather than less seem likely. I want to use the hex collet chuck so I can turn some particular parts and then bring the block to the mill and do some milling without removing the part.  I was hoping to get good repeatability this way. This seems like a simple way to machine my parts but getting there may be the problem.

Bill from Socal


Re: Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

Steve Wells
 

I have OCD Roger…LOL, it’s a curse most of the time!

I can see the shifter knob peaking out just above the hand wheel.

Also I have a pristine 1935 405 bed that Turk send me a few years ago that I’ve slowly

been converting to a Model A. I’ve had to modify/mill the bed to accept the A-B apron, so

I’m familiar with the lower casting of the newer bed and the older ones. I can’t change the feet

without making an adaptor plate. I’m just going to leave the original feet on it and fill the

old casting hole for the wiring, although I’d really like to have the early 1947 intermediate style bed feet.

 

Steve

 

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Roger Bickers via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, October 6, 2021 11:35 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

 

Damn Steve,  how'd you see those knobs for the feeds?  Must not be on a phone like I am. Lol

Roger

 

On Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 11:31 AM, Steve Wells

<wswells@...> wrote:

This is a Workshop Catalog number 477, 6-speed Model B, made between late 1939 and late 1945.

It has a keyed lead screw with an A-B apron, old style bed feet, bed mount switch with the wiring hole in the

left bed foot. Post the serial number for us for a more accurate ship date.

 

Steve

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Faust via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, October 6, 2021 7:52 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

 



Need help with ID. I'm thinking early 9", but could it be a "Junior". Sorry for bad pictures, a little crowded in there.


Re: Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

On Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 04:56 AM, m. allan noah wrote:
Looks like a regular side oiler 9C, made for several decades. Get the serial number off the top side of the bed, right end.
 
I'm not sure of that.  When I enlarge the pic, I think I can see
the lever for the cross/longitudinal feeds.  I can't see the star
clutch knob but the hand wheel is in the way.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

Roger Bickers
 

Damn Steve,  how'd you see those knobs for the feeds?  Must not be on a phone like I am. Lol
Roger


On Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 11:31 AM, Steve Wells
<wswells@...> wrote:

This is a Workshop Catalog number 477, 6-speed Model B, made between late 1939 and late 1945.

It has a keyed lead screw with an A-B apron, old style bed feet, bed mount switch with the wiring hole in the

left bed foot. Post the serial number for us for a more accurate ship date.

 

Steve

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Faust via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, October 6, 2021 7:52 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

 



Need help with ID. I'm thinking early 9", but could it be a "Junior". Sorry for bad pictures, a little crowded in there.


Re: turning hardened steel

William Nelson
 

That was my plan with the scrap stock to get it as concentric as possible. Now the problem is taking light cuts with carbide. Carbide normally from what I've read want's high rpm and large feeds that wont work well in this situation. Will the micro grain carbide with a super sharp edge allow you to take light cuts? I have had very little opportunity to use carbide on the lathe and had mixed results. Putting the collet chuck in the 3 jaw chuck doesn't appear to give any benefit over just using the 3 jaw alone. The possibility of increased run out rather than less seem likely. I want to use the hex collet chuck so I can turn some particular parts and then bring the block to the mill and do some milling without removing the part.  I was hoping to get good repeatability this way. This seems like a simple way to machine my parts but getting there may be the problem.

Bill from Socal


Re: Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

Steve Wells
 

This is a Workshop Catalog number 477, 6-speed Model B, made between late 1939 and late 1945.

It has a keyed lead screw with an A-B apron, old style bed feet, bed mount switch with the wiring hole in the

left bed foot. Post the serial number for us for a more accurate ship date.

 

Steve

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Faust via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, October 6, 2021 7:52 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

 



Need help with ID. I'm thinking early 9", but could it be a "Junior". Sorry for bad pictures, a little crowded in there.


Re: Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

Roger Bickers
 

Juniors have a more "boxy" apron..this looks like a C as it appears to only have a halfnut lever at the right side of the apron face. Google south bend A, B, and C separately to see the distinctions.

Be sure to look for the set of change gears as it has no gearbox. Should be like 13 of them. 

Look for a steady rest and a follow rest, as well as a 3&4 jaw chucks, a face plate, a dog plate and dogs. May even find a milling attachment.  

If you don't know what the stuff is, Google it.

Roger. 


On Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 7:56 AM, m. allan noah
<kitno455@...> wrote:
Looks like a regular side oiler 9C, made for several decades. Get the serial number off the top side of the bed, right end.

allan

On Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 7:51 AM Tom Faust via groups.io <TWFAUST=AOL.com@groups.io> wrote:


Need help with ID. I'm thinking early 9", but could it be a "Junior". Sorry for bad pictures, a little crowded in there.



--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

m. allan noah
 

Looks like a regular side oiler 9C, made for several decades. Get the serial number off the top side of the bed, right end.

allan


On Wed, Oct 6, 2021 at 7:51 AM Tom Faust via groups.io <TWFAUST=AOL.com@groups.io> wrote:


Need help with ID. I'm thinking early 9", but could it be a "Junior". Sorry for bad pictures, a little crowded in there.



--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Old South Bend lathe - Help with ID?

Tom Faust
 



Need help with ID. I'm thinking early 9", but could it be a "Junior". Sorry for bad pictures, a little crowded in there.


Re: turning hardened steel

Ondrej Krejci
 

Howdy,

Personally, I'd just use the hex block in a three jaw chuck, but, if one has his heart set on screwing it on the spindle, the hex block with the largest collet mounted on turned up scrap stock would be the best bet for gingerly making the needed threads.  40 to 45 Rc should pass the file test, but I'd use carbide inserts.

Enjoy,


OK


Re: turning hardened steel

Mark
 

On Mon, Oct 4, 2021 at 09:08 PM, mike allen wrote:
heres a few spindle mount ER Chucks
Good info Mike. I may use that at some point. Thanks


Re: turning hardened steel

mike allen
 

On 10/4/2021 6:21 PM, Carl Bukowsky via groups.io wrote:
Bill, 
I have to say you may not get results you are looking for by working the ER-40 collet chuck-to-spindle engagement last.  Ideal sequence is make the spindle threads first, then make the collet holder while mounted to the spindle.

Making a collet chuck in the reverse order, spindle threads last, you loose the concentricity relationship inherent in the single operation of creating the collet holder while it’s attached to the spindle.  

All your spindle-to-chuck concentricity you cut will be independent  to that of the collet block holder. Any small error in your chuck, and any error in centering the work piece in the chuck, will all be added into the spindle threads you cut. 

I just made an ER-40 collet chuck on my SB 9” from  2” piece of 4140 and it’s not that complicated.

You can make your own ER-40 nut if you don’t want to cut metric threads.  I went metric using some 3D printed change gears-my metric threads worked great with the ER-40 but I bought.  For the plans I bought a back issue Machinist’s Worshop (Feb/Mar 2015, Vol 28 No 1). Good Luck!  Carl


Sent by my iPhone

On Oct 4, 2021, at 7:04 PM, William Nelson <wnnelson@...> wrote:

I'm thinking of making a ER40 chuck for my 10K. Because I don't want to set up to thread metric and bore the 8 degree internal taper (best ground, no grinder) I was thinking of using a ER40 hex block. I would have only one operation a internal 1.5"-8 thread of which I've done a bunch in aluminum and mild steel.. Now the problem is these blocks are hardened to 40-45 HRc. I'm not really sure how hard that is comparatively speaking. I have some 5C blocks which seem pretty hard. I'm sure I could use carbide to bore it out (not a lot of material as they are already bored) with no problem but I'm not sure how well the threading would go. I know I would need carbide for this too and besides the block itself would be my only expense. Has anyone had any experience doing a internal thread on hardened steel? I can not thread mill it. If nobody has tried this does it sound feasible to anyone? I'll be going over to my local machine tool shop (1/4 mile away) and ask them what they think too lots of knowledge with the guys who work there plus I can buy my carbide threader (Solid or insert?) there too. My only other "SMALL" problem would be getting it perfectly aligned which shouldn't take me much more than a day at most.  :(

Bill form Socal


Re: turning hardened steel

Carl Bukowsky
 

Bill, 
I have to say you may not get results you are looking for by working the ER-40 collet chuck-to-spindle engagement last.  Ideal sequence is make the spindle threads first, then make the collet holder while mounted to the spindle.

Making a collet chuck in the reverse order, spindle threads last, you loose the concentricity relationship inherent in the single operation of creating the collet holder while it’s attached to the spindle.  

All your spindle-to-chuck concentricity you cut will be independent  to that of the collet block holder. Any small error in your chuck, and any error in centering the work piece in the chuck, will all be added into the spindle threads you cut. 

I just made an ER-40 collet chuck on my SB 9” from  2” piece of 4140 and it’s not that complicated.

You can make your own ER-40 nut if you don’t want to cut metric threads.  I went metric using some 3D printed change gears-my metric threads worked great with the ER-40 but I bought.  For the plans I bought a back issue Machinist’s Worshop (Feb/Mar 2015, Vol 28 No 1). Good Luck!  Carl


Sent by my iPhone

On Oct 4, 2021, at 7:04 PM, William Nelson <wnnelson@...> wrote:

I'm thinking of making a ER40 chuck for my 10K. Because I don't want to set up to thread metric and bore the 8 degree internal taper (best ground, no grinder) I was thinking of using a ER40 hex block. I would have only one operation a internal 1.5"-8 thread of which I've done a bunch in aluminum and mild steel.. Now the problem is these blocks are hardened to 40-45 HRc. I'm not really sure how hard that is comparatively speaking. I have some 5C blocks which seem pretty hard. I'm sure I could use carbide to bore it out (not a lot of material as they are already bored) with no problem but I'm not sure how well the threading would go. I know I would need carbide for this too and besides the block itself would be my only expense. Has anyone had any experience doing a internal thread on hardened steel? I can not thread mill it. If nobody has tried this does it sound feasible to anyone? I'll be going over to my local machine tool shop (1/4 mile away) and ask them what they think too lots of knowledge with the guys who work there plus I can buy my carbide threader (Solid or insert?) there too. My only other "SMALL" problem would be getting it perfectly aligned which shouldn't take me much more than a day at most.  :(

Bill form Socal


turning hardened steel

William Nelson
 

I'm thinking of making a ER40 chuck for my 10K. Because I don't want to set up to thread metric and bore the 8 degree internal taper (best ground, no grinder) I was thinking of using a ER40 hex block. I would have only one operation a internal 1.5"-8 thread of which I've done a bunch in aluminum and mild steel.. Now the problem is these blocks are hardened to 40-45 HRc. I'm not really sure how hard that is comparatively speaking. I have some 5C blocks which seem pretty hard. I'm sure I could use carbide to bore it out (not a lot of material as they are already bored) with no problem but I'm not sure how well the threading would go. I know I would need carbide for this too and besides the block itself would be my only expense. Has anyone had any experience doing a internal thread on hardened steel? I can not thread mill it. If nobody has tried this does it sound feasible to anyone? I'll be going over to my local machine tool shop (1/4 mile away) and ask them what they think too lots of knowledge with the guys who work there plus I can buy my carbide threader (Solid or insert?) there too. My only other "SMALL" problem would be getting it perfectly aligned which shouldn't take me much more than a day at most.  :(

Bill form Socal


Re: sb 13 compound angle markings. PROBLEM SOLVED ...

Bill in OKC too
 

That caffeine deficiency will get you every time! Too much blood in the caffeine system keeps your brain from functioning, and makes such errors nearly unavoidable. ;)

That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Thursday, September 30, 2021, 01:17:58 PM CDT, ken campbell <deltainc@...> wrote:


upon further review ... and a cold pepsi ... as a 40 year expert craftsman, i never admit to mistakes ... but a certain dumbutt made a teensy error and now i can happily let you know that Southbend has not let us down ... those degree marks are actually ( nearly ) correct ...   still best to set critical angles with an indicator tho ...

ken relieved ...


Re: sb 13 compound angle markings. PROBLEM SOLVED ...

ken campbell
 

upon further review ... and a cold pepsi ... as a 40 year expert craftsman, i never admit to mistakes ... but a certain dumbutt made a teensy error and now i can happily let you know that Southbend has not let us down ... those degree marks are actually ( nearly ) correct ...   still best to set critical angles with an indicator tho ...

ken relieved ...


Re: sb 13 compound angle markings.

wmrmeyers@gmail.com
 

There are a couple of ways that the angle markings on a lathe can be set up, if I understand correctly. One is with zero on the axis of the lathe bed, and the other at 90 degrees to the lathe bed. I understand that US made lathes use the axis of the lathe bed, and import (i.e., Chinese lathes) use the 90 degrees... Quinn comments on it in one of her Blondihacks lathe videos, as her lathe is an import. One of the modifications I made to my HF 7x10 mini-lathe was to pull off the degree scale and throw it away. I use a protractor to set angles on it. The Clausing Colchester lathe I use at school, however, uses the lathe bed for the reference. Once I get all my lathes at home operational, I'm probably going to be even more confused than you are while switching from one lathe to another. I have Atlas and South Bend lathes, as well as Harbor Freight and Smithy. And I had a short night last night, and I'm severely caffeine deficient, so I may be confused already! ;)

Bill in OKC <----- Not a professional machinist. Have been taking a professional machinist's course that should last for 8 months or so for more than six years... You figure it out! ;)

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.) 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Thursday, September 30, 2021, 09:00:45 AM CDT, ken campbell <deltainc@...> wrote:


oh no !! .. i needed to grind a 1.5 degree angle on a form boring bar ... so i set my trusty compound angle to 1.5 degrees and dialed the compound past a dial indicator an inch ... great, 0.012 taper or so ... hmmm .. shoulda been 0.026 ...  what the ?? ... so i set the compound to the 3 degree mark and now i get the 0.026 per 1 inch ...  what the ?? ...  yep, i indicated that i was cranking in 1.0 inch ... yep, i repeated the test against a perfectly straight piece in the chuck with the indicator stuck to the compound.  yep, the index marks read 90 degrees at 1/4 turn ... 

hey, after 40 years of this i just found out i am a beginner ...  

or maybe the compound index is for included angles ?? .. i just threw that one in there ...

help ! ... can we not even trust south bend  ? ...   i feel my dog just died ... or maybe Regan was right ... trust but verify ...  

ken the depressed 






801 - 820 of 106357