Date   

Re: cut an M1.75 thread

Glenn N
 

Here is the info I have from a different source
M1.75
Stud gear 28
Screw gear 56
Plunger whole B
Plunger hole 1
Gear 1 127/100

I hope this is helpful.

Glenn

On Sep 15, 2021, at 2:51 PM, Jack Dinan <jack@...> wrote:

I need to cut an M1.75 thread on my English SB9A.

I’ve ordered a 120/100 transposing gear.

In the How to run a Lathe manual:

1. In the index chart Figure 249 I see for M1.75 the combination is a 56 tooth stud gear and an 80 tooth screw gear.

2. In the chart Figure 253, for the same thread I see a 50 tooth stud gear listed.

I’m misreading these, I’m sure, but I don’t know how.

For M1.75 and a 127/100 transposing gear, what stud and screw gears should I use?







cut an M1.75 thread

Jack Dinan
 

I need to cut an M1.75 thread on my English SB9A.

I’ve ordered a 120/100 transposing gear.

In the How to run a Lathe manual:

1. In the index chart Figure 249 I see for M1.75 the combination is a 56 tooth stud gear and an 80 tooth screw gear.

2. In the chart Figure 253, for the same thread I see a 50 tooth stud gear listed.

I’m misreading these, I’m sure, but I don’t know how.

For M1.75 and a 127/100 transposing gear, what stud and screw gears should I use?


Re: What's this?

Bill in OKC too
 

No clue here, anyway! Good luck finding out!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Wednesday, September 15, 2021, 09:36:49 AM CDT, William Nelson <wnnelson@...> wrote:


The listing says milling attachment South Bend. But what is it? 
www.ebay.com/itm/165072266390


Re: 1-7/8 x 8 backplate for 10R Spindles

Thomas Tallant
 

Did you sell the tap? Sent pm no reply still wont it it if available.

On Mon, Sep 13, 2021 at 4:11 PM wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:
Hi There, 

I have three of the 10R's at present.  One I converted to 10L by changing
the spindle over to an L00 taper (because I have a lot of L00 tooling). 
The other two are original 1-7/8" x 8tpi spindles.

I can do internal threading but long ago I bought a 1-7/8 x 8tpi tap just
in case.  I noticed that my tap is slightly bigger than the thread on the
spindle.  Not really a problem but it will leave a shallow helix groove on
the register area of the backing plate because the crest of the tap threads
are slightly taller than the SBL spindle threads. 

The 10R has a stronger spindle than the 10L but the through hole is only
slightly larger that one inch (I believe it is something like 1.050").  The
original SBL collets only go up to 11/16" but if you mount a collet type
chuck, you can get up to 1" capacity.

I've always wondered why SBL offered the 10R.  The larger capacity of
the 10L and its ability to use 5C collets made it a superior seller to the
10R and the only difference was the spindle. 

My theory is that the 10R was the "original" Heavy Ten but when the
Cataract lathe came out with the number 5 Cataract collets (5C),  They
were in high demand in the industrial world.  SBL reacted by changing
the spindle in the Heavy Ten so that it could accept 5C collets and could
be more competitive (i.e. the 10L)

So I look at the Heavy Ten's as the 10R  (R meaning "regular spindle") and
the 10L (L meaning "large spindle").

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: What's this?

m. allan noah
 

Interesting, looks like some kind of hand shaper. SB made a mica undercutter, but it is much lighter duty than this.

allan


On Wed, Sep 15, 2021 at 10:36 AM William Nelson <wnnelson@...> wrote:
The listing says milling attachment South Bend. But what is it? 
www.ebay.com/itm/165072266390



--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


What's this?

William Nelson
 

The listing says milling attachment South Bend. But what is it? 
www.ebay.com/itm/165072266390


Re: 1-7/8 x 8 backplate for 10R Spindles

wlw19958
 

Hi There, 

I have three of the 10R's at present.  One I converted to 10L by changing
the spindle over to an L00 taper (because I have a lot of L00 tooling). 
The other two are original 1-7/8" x 8tpi spindles.

I can do internal threading but long ago I bought a 1-7/8 x 8tpi tap just
in case.  I noticed that my tap is slightly bigger than the thread on the
spindle.  Not really a problem but it will leave a shallow helix groove on
the register area of the backing plate because the crest of the tap threads
are slightly taller than the SBL spindle threads. 

The 10R has a stronger spindle than the 10L but the through hole is only
slightly larger that one inch (I believe it is something like 1.050").  The
original SBL collets only go up to 11/16" but if you mount a collet type
chuck, you can get up to 1" capacity.

I've always wondered why SBL offered the 10R.  The larger capacity of
the 10L and its ability to use 5C collets made it a superior seller to the
10R and the only difference was the spindle. 

My theory is that the 10R was the "original" Heavy Ten but when the
Cataract lathe came out with the number 5 Cataract collets (5C),  They
were in high demand in the industrial world.  SBL reacted by changing
the spindle in the Heavy Ten so that it could accept 5C collets and could
be more competitive (i.e. the 10L)

So I look at the Heavy Ten's as the 10R  (R meaning "regular spindle") and
the 10L (L meaning "large spindle").

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: 1-7/8 x 8 backplate for 10R Spindles

Thomas Tallant
 

I  Will buy the 1 7/8 tap fro you will pm address to you need info to send payment.

On Mon, Sep 13, 2021 at 12:11 PM <v.gearheardt@...> wrote:

 


I have a little used SB, used by USN, 10R, 36” bed, with a 1-⅞” spindle. It has the original 5”, 3 jaw, but only one set of jaws and the run out is bad. They made very few small spindle lathes so If you want a new 3 or 4 jaw, there aren't any unless you change out to the larger spindle, which I don’t need for my work.

Here was my solution:

I purchased a 1-3/4 x 8 , 6” dia cast iron backplate from Little Machine shop for $53. As I was unsure of my internal threading skills,I purchased a 

1-⅞ x8 tap for final threading/cleanup. You need to first increase the bore (check the spec in Machinery Handbook), and then I ran enough threading  runs to get my tap started. If you are good with internal threading or have a machinist friend, the Tap is not needed. 


I purchased a Shars 3 jaw for approx $100, and for a total cost of $150, plus $60 for my “tap insurance”, I have a new, 6”  1-⅞ 3 jaw at 6”. 

Easy to machine the backplate to fit indent in 3 jaw. 


If anyone wants to buy my little used 1-⅞ x 8 TAP, I will sell it for $35 including postage.

 


1-7/8 x 8 backplate for 10R Spindles

v.gearheardt@...
 

 


I have a little used SB, used by USN, 10R, 36” bed, with a 1-⅞” spindle. It has the original 5”, 3 jaw, but only one set of jaws and the run out is bad. They made very few small spindle lathes so If you want a new 3 or 4 jaw, there aren't any unless you change out to the larger spindle, which I don’t need for my work.

Here was my solution:

I purchased a 1-3/4 x 8 , 6” dia cast iron backplate from Little Machine shop for $53. As I was unsure of my internal threading skills,I purchased a 

1-⅞ x8 tap for final threading/cleanup. You need to first increase the bore (check the spec in Machinery Handbook), and then I ran enough threading  runs to get my tap started. If you are good with internal threading or have a machinist friend, the Tap is not needed. 


I purchased a Shars 3 jaw for approx $100, and for a total cost of $150, plus $60 for my “tap insurance”, I have a new, 6”  1-⅞ 3 jaw at 6”. 

Easy to machine the backplate to fit indent in 3 jaw. 


If anyone wants to buy my little used 1-⅞ x 8 TAP, I will sell it for $35 including postage.

 


Re: Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

rlm_mcv
 

Eddie, you are asking questions from 30 years ago.  Settings and wire were the same as I was using for mild steel, it was a standard co2/argon mix (I did increase the flow but it might not be required). I used no preheat or special cool down.  I suggest you watch this video, it is more current and he is attempting a comparison.







On Sunday, September 12, 2021, 02:26:45 AM CDT, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:


Apologies to all for going a bit off topic, but I'm fascinated by this and would like to try it. What filler wire did you use, please? Was the current & wire feed the same as you would use on mild steel? Any pre / post heating? Any limit to duration of welding if intermittent? How much did you turn up the gas cf steel work, and what mix was it?


Thanks,


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "rlm_mcv via groups.io" <rlm_mcv@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, 11 Sep, 21 At 21:38
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

I know it is not common excepted practice, but I used to turn up the argon/mix on my Mig and welded cast all the time without failure of the welds. I did weld some broken castings from a 24 inch X 12 foot South Bend of about 1920 vintage. They welded easily with the mig and were still in service when the lathe sold 30 yrs later. My guess is the mig allowed less heat and a more flexible filler metal. It has worked for me on a multitude of items, but try at your own risk.

On Saturday, September 11, 2021, 03:07:11 PM CDT, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:


I have a good number of successful C/I weld repairs to my name. I use only pure Nickel MMA (stick) rods and a DC welder, with the job bombarding the electrode with electrons so it gets 2/3rds of the heat and the job only 1/3rd. (I.e. electrode +, job -, the usual arrangement with DC welding.)


There are 2 ways to proceed, either you need lots of tea and get very thirsty, or you can drink lots of tea.


The first way is to make the whole job red hot and keep it that way throughout the process, allowing it to cool uniformly afterwards. One way to achieve uniform cooling is to insulate and therefore cool slowly, but there are other ways. This is very good where the size of the workpiece brings it within your heating capabilities. There are professional outfits that weld large objects like this, by building a firebrick oven around the job, sticking a gas torch through a hole, and then welding via another hole. Not a pleasant way to earn a living on a hot day. British Rail used to have locomotive cylinder heads of V16 3300 HP Diesel engines (10" bore x 12" stroke, which is approximately 15 litres per cylinder) welded like this, and they lasted no worse than a new one.


The other way is to heat only to take the chill off, say 50C, and weld for no more than 3 seconds at a time, immediately then hammering with a pointed chipping hammer, then allowing heat soak for a while to spread the temperature throughout the object. For large objects, and especially handy where there is more than one job to work on. I once repaired 5 cast iron window frames like this, keeping moving from one to the next almost without dead time.


Both methods need a weld prep that is virtually like one for steel, BUT the materials have a quirk, and that is that the arc tries to stick to one side of the groove or the other so you need to have a groove that is wide enough for you to be able to keep pulling it back & forth.


I always try to make the job stronger than the original, especially if I don't know why the crack occurred. One of the attached photos shows a radius rod lifter from my steam loco which contained a longitudinal crack. I can't imagine how that occurred, so after welding, I shrank on some steel reinforcing rings. The original profile is still on the RH end.


The other photo is me grooving out an oil tray from the underside of an axle bearing. I could see why this was cracked, a weak design in conjunction with heavy handed spannering, so the only post weld "reinforcement" here has been painting the oil side with fibre glass resin to keep the oil from penetrating any porosity, and being careful with the spanners.


Both the above jobs were in the "small" i.e. hot category. I welded a longitudinal crack in one of the cylinders the cold way, as heating the whole cylinder was entirely unfeasible (just over 8" bore and probably weighs 1/4 ton). Additionally, it had just been rebored and the valve face skimmed, so I didn't want any distortion. The crack started at a weak point where a cylinder drain cock hole was in line with a hole for a cover fastening stud (it would have been so simple to avoid this alignment and weakness at the design stage, but that was pre 1914). In addition to welding up as much of the crack as I could, I drilled & tapped across the line of the crack through the drain cock boss for a grade 12.9 Allen screw, bolted a block either side of the crack and pulled these together with 2 more Allen screws, and added some extra cylinder cover fasteners either side of the existing and made sure those were properly tight. The weld needed to be ground back a little below the rubbing surface for the piston rings, as Nickel is a poor bearing material, known to cause crankshaft bearing seizures in Diesel engines if the interlayer that prevents diffusion between layers of a shell becomes exposed to any great extent.


I suggest you practice on a piece of scrap first, in order to prevent the job from becoming just that! Take care to preserve critical alignments during all processes. In the case of you gearbox, it would be the holes for your shafts. Maybe clamping across the crack to hold it shut during the hot work would be the right thing to do.


Good luck and best wishes,


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "Vince Eugenio" <vince.eugenio.phd@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Friday, 10 Sep, 21 At 21:53
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

Thanks Dave, that is what I have found as well.


Re: Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Apologies to all for going a bit off topic, but I'm fascinated by this and would like to try it. What filler wire did you use, please? Was the current & wire feed the same as you would use on mild steel? Any pre / post heating? Any limit to duration of welding if intermittent? How much did you turn up the gas cf steel work, and what mix was it?


Thanks,


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "rlm_mcv via groups.io" <rlm_mcv@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, 11 Sep, 21 At 21:38
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

I know it is not common excepted practice, but I used to turn up the argon/mix on my Mig and welded cast all the time without failure of the welds. I did weld some broken castings from a 24 inch X 12 foot South Bend of about 1920 vintage. They welded easily with the mig and were still in service when the lathe sold 30 yrs later. My guess is the mig allowed less heat and a more flexible filler metal. It has worked for me on a multitude of items, but try at your own risk.

On Saturday, September 11, 2021, 03:07:11 PM CDT, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:


I have a good number of successful C/I weld repairs to my name. I use only pure Nickel MMA (stick) rods and a DC welder, with the job bombarding the electrode with electrons so it gets 2/3rds of the heat and the job only 1/3rd. (I.e. electrode +, job -, the usual arrangement with DC welding.)


There are 2 ways to proceed, either you need lots of tea and get very thirsty, or you can drink lots of tea.


The first way is to make the whole job red hot and keep it that way throughout the process, allowing it to cool uniformly afterwards. One way to achieve uniform cooling is to insulate and therefore cool slowly, but there are other ways. This is very good where the size of the workpiece brings it within your heating capabilities. There are professional outfits that weld large objects like this, by building a firebrick oven around the job, sticking a gas torch through a hole, and then welding via another hole. Not a pleasant way to earn a living on a hot day. British Rail used to have locomotive cylinder heads of V16 3300 HP Diesel engines (10" bore x 12" stroke, which is approximately 15 litres per cylinder) welded like this, and they lasted no worse than a new one.


The other way is to heat only to take the chill off, say 50C, and weld for no more than 3 seconds at a time, immediately then hammering with a pointed chipping hammer, then allowing heat soak for a while to spread the temperature throughout the object. For large objects, and especially handy where there is more than one job to work on. I once repaired 5 cast iron window frames like this, keeping moving from one to the next almost without dead time.


Both methods need a weld prep that is virtually like one for steel, BUT the materials have a quirk, and that is that the arc tries to stick to one side of the groove or the other so you need to have a groove that is wide enough for you to be able to keep pulling it back & forth.


I always try to make the job stronger than the original, especially if I don't know why the crack occurred. One of the attached photos shows a radius rod lifter from my steam loco which contained a longitudinal crack. I can't imagine how that occurred, so after welding, I shrank on some steel reinforcing rings. The original profile is still on the RH end.


The other photo is me grooving out an oil tray from the underside of an axle bearing. I could see why this was cracked, a weak design in conjunction with heavy handed spannering, so the only post weld "reinforcement" here has been painting the oil side with fibre glass resin to keep the oil from penetrating any porosity, and being careful with the spanners.


Both the above jobs were in the "small" i.e. hot category. I welded a longitudinal crack in one of the cylinders the cold way, as heating the whole cylinder was entirely unfeasible (just over 8" bore and probably weighs 1/4 ton). Additionally, it had just been rebored and the valve face skimmed, so I didn't want any distortion. The crack started at a weak point where a cylinder drain cock hole was in line with a hole for a cover fastening stud (it would have been so simple to avoid this alignment and weakness at the design stage, but that was pre 1914). In addition to welding up as much of the crack as I could, I drilled & tapped across the line of the crack through the drain cock boss for a grade 12.9 Allen screw, bolted a block either side of the crack and pulled these together with 2 more Allen screws, and added some extra cylinder cover fasteners either side of the existing and made sure those were properly tight. The weld needed to be ground back a little below the rubbing surface for the piston rings, as Nickel is a poor bearing material, known to cause crankshaft bearing seizures in Diesel engines if the interlayer that prevents diffusion between layers of a shell becomes exposed to any great extent.


I suggest you practice on a piece of scrap first, in order to prevent the job from becoming just that! Take care to preserve critical alignments during all processes. In the case of you gearbox, it would be the holes for your shafts. Maybe clamping across the crack to hold it shut during the hot work would be the right thing to do.


Good luck and best wishes,


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "Vince Eugenio" <vince.eugenio.phd@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Friday, 10 Sep, 21 At 21:53
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

Thanks Dave, that is what I have found as well.


Re: Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

Ondrej Krejci
 

Hello,

Hopefully you can find a replacement easily, if not, I vote for simple bronze brazing.
Oxy-propane kits aren´t expensive and for the occasional brazing job sufficient.
Personally, I´ve used mine to braze a 1917 Monarch lathe gear quadrant and an ancient electric motor frame, both cast iron.

Happy hunting or brazing,


OK


Re: Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

rlm_mcv
 

I know it is not common excepted practice, but I used to turn up the argon/mix on my Mig and welded cast all the time without failure of the welds.  I did weld some broken castings from a 24 inch X 12 foot South Bend of about 1920 vintage.  They welded easily with the mig and were still in service when the lathe sold 30 yrs later.  My guess is the mig allowed less heat and a more flexible filler metal.  It has worked for me on a multitude of items, but try at your own risk.

On Saturday, September 11, 2021, 03:07:11 PM CDT, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:


I have a good number of successful C/I weld repairs to my name. I use only pure Nickel MMA (stick) rods and a DC welder, with the job bombarding the electrode with electrons so it gets 2/3rds of the heat and the job only 1/3rd. (I.e. electrode +, job -, the usual arrangement with DC welding.)


There are 2 ways to proceed, either you need lots of tea and get very thirsty, or you can drink lots of tea.


The first way is to make the whole job red hot and keep it that way throughout the process, allowing it to cool uniformly afterwards. One way to achieve uniform cooling is to insulate and therefore cool slowly, but there are other ways. This is very good where the size of the workpiece brings it within your heating capabilities. There are professional outfits that weld large objects like this, by building a firebrick oven around the job, sticking a gas torch through a hole, and then welding via another hole. Not a pleasant way to earn a living on a hot day. British Rail used to have locomotive cylinder heads of V16 3300 HP Diesel engines (10" bore x 12" stroke, which is approximately 15 litres per cylinder) welded like this, and they lasted no worse than a new one.


The other way is to heat only to take the chill off, say 50C, and weld for no more than 3 seconds at a time, immediately then hammering with a pointed chipping hammer, then allowing heat soak for a while to spread the temperature throughout the object. For large objects, and especially handy where there is more than one job to work on. I once repaired 5 cast iron window frames like this, keeping moving from one to the next almost without dead time.


Both methods need a weld prep that is virtually like one for steel, BUT the materials have a quirk, and that is that the arc tries to stick to one side of the groove or the other so you need to have a groove that is wide enough for you to be able to keep pulling it back & forth.


I always try to make the job stronger than the original, especially if I don't know why the crack occurred. One of the attached photos shows a radius rod lifter from my steam loco which contained a longitudinal crack. I can't imagine how that occurred, so after welding, I shrank on some steel reinforcing rings. The original profile is still on the RH end.


The other photo is me grooving out an oil tray from the underside of an axle bearing. I could see why this was cracked, a weak design in conjunction with heavy handed spannering, so the only post weld "reinforcement" here has been painting the oil side with fibre glass resin to keep the oil from penetrating any porosity, and being careful with the spanners.


Both the above jobs were in the "small" i.e. hot category. I welded a longitudinal crack in one of the cylinders the cold way, as heating the whole cylinder was entirely unfeasible (just over 8" bore and probably weighs 1/4 ton). Additionally, it had just been rebored and the valve face skimmed, so I didn't want any distortion. The crack started at a weak point where a cylinder drain cock hole was in line with a hole for a cover fastening stud (it would have been so simple to avoid this alignment and weakness at the design stage, but that was pre 1914). In addition to welding up as much of the crack as I could, I drilled & tapped across the line of the crack through the drain cock boss for a grade 12.9 Allen screw, bolted a block either side of the crack and pulled these together with 2 more Allen screws, and added some extra cylinder cover fasteners either side of the existing and made sure those were properly tight. The weld needed to be ground back a little below the rubbing surface for the piston rings, as Nickel is a poor bearing material, known to cause crankshaft bearing seizures in Diesel engines if the interlayer that prevents diffusion between layers of a shell becomes exposed to any great extent.


I suggest you practice on a piece of scrap first, in order to prevent the job from becoming just that! Take care to preserve critical alignments during all processes. In the case of you gearbox, it would be the holes for your shafts. Maybe clamping across the crack to hold it shut during the hot work would be the right thing to do.


Good luck and best wishes,


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "Vince Eugenio" <vince.eugenio.phd@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Friday, 10 Sep, 21 At 21:53
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

Thanks Dave, that is what I have found as well.


Re: Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

I have a good number of successful C/I weld repairs to my name. I use only pure Nickel MMA (stick) rods and a DC welder, with the job bombarding the electrode with electrons so it gets 2/3rds of the heat and the job only 1/3rd. (I.e. electrode +, job -, the usual arrangement with DC welding.)


There are 2 ways to proceed, either you need lots of tea and get very thirsty, or you can drink lots of tea.


The first way is to make the whole job red hot and keep it that way throughout the process, allowing it to cool uniformly afterwards. One way to achieve uniform cooling is to insulate and therefore cool slowly, but there are other ways. This is very good where the size of the workpiece brings it within your heating capabilities. There are professional outfits that weld large objects like this, by building a firebrick oven around the job, sticking a gas torch through a hole, and then welding via another hole. Not a pleasant way to earn a living on a hot day. British Rail used to have locomotive cylinder heads of V16 3300 HP Diesel engines (10" bore x 12" stroke, which is approximately 15 litres per cylinder) welded like this, and they lasted no worse than a new one.


The other way is to heat only to take the chill off, say 50C, and weld for no more than 3 seconds at a time, immediately then hammering with a pointed chipping hammer, then allowing heat soak for a while to spread the temperature throughout the object. For large objects, and especially handy where there is more than one job to work on. I once repaired 5 cast iron window frames like this, keeping moving from one to the next almost without dead time.


Both methods need a weld prep that is virtually like one for steel, BUT the materials have a quirk, and that is that the arc tries to stick to one side of the groove or the other so you need to have a groove that is wide enough for you to be able to keep pulling it back & forth.


I always try to make the job stronger than the original, especially if I don't know why the crack occurred. One of the attached photos shows a radius rod lifter from my steam loco which contained a longitudinal crack. I can't imagine how that occurred, so after welding, I shrank on some steel reinforcing rings. The original profile is still on the RH end.


The other photo is me grooving out an oil tray from the underside of an axle bearing. I could see why this was cracked, a weak design in conjunction with heavy handed spannering, so the only post weld "reinforcement" here has been painting the oil side with fibre glass resin to keep the oil from penetrating any porosity, and being careful with the spanners.


Both the above jobs were in the "small" i.e. hot category. I welded a longitudinal crack in one of the cylinders the cold way, as heating the whole cylinder was entirely unfeasible (just over 8" bore and probably weighs 1/4 ton). Additionally, it had just been rebored and the valve face skimmed, so I didn't want any distortion. The crack started at a weak point where a cylinder drain cock hole was in line with a hole for a cover fastening stud (it would have been so simple to avoid this alignment and weakness at the design stage, but that was pre 1914). In addition to welding up as much of the crack as I could, I drilled & tapped across the line of the crack through the drain cock boss for a grade 12.9 Allen screw, bolted a block either side of the crack and pulled these together with 2 more Allen screws, and added some extra cylinder cover fasteners either side of the existing and made sure those were properly tight. The weld needed to be ground back a little below the rubbing surface for the piston rings, as Nickel is a poor bearing material, known to cause crankshaft bearing seizures in Diesel engines if the interlayer that prevents diffusion between layers of a shell becomes exposed to any great extent.


I suggest you practice on a piece of scrap first, in order to prevent the job from becoming just that! Take care to preserve critical alignments during all processes. In the case of you gearbox, it would be the holes for your shafts. Maybe clamping across the crack to hold it shut during the hot work would be the right thing to do.


Good luck and best wishes,


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "Vince Eugenio" <vince.eugenio.phd@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Friday, 10 Sep, 21 At 21:53
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

Thanks Dave, that is what I have found as well.


Re: Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

Tim Bowers
 

You might rethink the difficulty of welding cast iron after watching these videos. I am planning to attempt it this way. The reason for all the traditional heating/cooling process is due to the characteristics of CI and Brass which leads to cracking.

https://youtu.be/adcdC8uAhR0

https://youtu.be/xfXqcOYqByQ


Re: Switch Smoke

comstock_friend
 
Edited

I run my 13" South Bend, Bridgeport J Head vertical mill and Diamond B12 horizontal at home on an RPC (Rotary Phase Converter) (240 volt single phase in, 240 volt 3 phase out). At the vacation house the Diamond 22M horizontal is run on 240 V 3 phase via an Emerson VFD, 240 VAC single phase in. The Rusnok Model 70 vertical has a Leeson brushed 190 VDC motor running on a Leeson variable speed controller with 240 VAC, single phase input.

They all run fine and are happy...

The Tormach PCNC 1100 takes 240 and 120 volt single phase in and takes care of itself getting the correct voltage to all its motors.

John


Re: Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

Vince Eugenio
 

Thanks Dave, that is what I have found as well. 


Re: Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

david_g4000
 

Vince,

I also have a single tumbler 1933 and love it. Used it today in fact.

If you do not find a replacement casting, they can be brazed back together by a skilled welder. It must be cleaned and ground for filling with brazing. Then heated carefully to a high temperture, then brazed, and then allowed to cool very slowly while wrapped in a fiberglass welding blanket or buried in dry sand overnight. I have successfully done so with some smaller castings.

Good luck, I hope you find a casting.

Dave

On 9/10/2021 4:31 PM, Vince Eugenio wrote:
Hi Folks,

I have a bad crack the gear box casting of my single tumbler 1938 heavy 9 wide bed lathe. (My fault, long shameful story.) I am looking to buy a complete unit that is good, or just the main casting that all the gears are housed in including the single tumbler lever. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

Vince.Eugenio.Phd@...


Heavy 10 Single Tumbler Gearbox - Want to Buy

Vince Eugenio
 

Hi Folks,

I have a bad crack the gear box casting of my single tumbler 1938 heavy 9 wide bed lathe. (My fault, long shameful story.) I am looking to buy a complete unit that is good, or just the main casting that all the gears are housed in including the single tumbler lever. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

Vince.Eugenio.Phd@...


Re: Switch Smoke

Joe
 

At 3/4 HP it is almost certain to be a single phase capacitor start or repulsion induction motor depending on age. 3 phase motor with a VFD would nowadays be a simpler conversion if you want more variable speeds but with the counter shaft and multiple speed set up you have there's little advantage to convert. It is true 3 phase motors are more reliable, but adding a VFD cancels that advantage. DC servo motors with controllers are probably about the same or lesser in reliability as the 3 phase with VFD and more expensive if you get the type for machinery.

Joe

981 - 1000 of 106475