Date   

Re: 5C collet closer

Jim_B
 

Long story, so forgive me.

I had an early 405 9’ Workshop. it had a “Top Oiler” headstock, I Changed this out to a later side oiler. While I was doing thisI also used a 10K spindle.
(Yes the 9” Workshop and 10K have the same journal dimensions.)

The primary reason, at the time, was that the 10K spindle has a slightly larger bore. 55/64 vs 49/64, or 0.860 vs 0.766. This is enough to add a lot of versatility.

IN ADDITION the 10K spindle will accept a SB proprietary 6K collet. It does this without any adapter. These allow one to hold 5/8 stock through the headstock as opposed to the upper limit of 1/2 THROUGH THE HEADSTOCK with the 3C.

6K collets are expensive and rare, I took me about 8 years to collect a complete set. I can go from 1/16 to 5/8 in steps of 1/64.

I highlighted the 1/2 THROUGH THE COLLET because there are some 3C collets larger than 1/2” which, have an internal step bore, and allow you to insert material to a depth of about 1”.
I had them in steps of 1/64 to 9/16” at one time. I sold my 405 some years ago, along with the larger than 1/2 collets.

One thing which has not been mentioned. Is that the 3C/5C/6K collets are available in in botjh square and Hex. Not so with the ER’s.

I use 5C on my 10L and I do have some hex and square collets. I find them quite useful. I do have and ER-40 setup, but I mostly use that for odd size work, since my 5C’s are incremented in 1/32” steps.

I do miss having the 1/64 steps of the 6K’s but while I still have the collet set, I don't have a Lathe to take them.

One other note. The ER’s with their adapter stick out beyond the spindle 1.5 to 2”. I don't care for that.




--
Jim B


Re: collets:

Nick Andrews
 

Thanks!  I just got a set of 29 ER40 collets to use in my SB mill and this chart will be helpful for me.  I ordered a couple of tool holders to use them with to better grip random-sized mills or drills since I only have a couple of 3/8" and 1/2" BT30 tool holders but a sordid collection of cutters. I was debating if I should buy a set of metric collets too.  Figured I could get a collet block to use them for holding work in the vise or on rotary table as well.  Or in the shaper vise.  My Sheldon lathe came with a few 5C collets, but I haven't made a collet closer for the spindle to use them with yet.  While I may buy more 5C collets, a ER40 collet chuck for the lathe might be more useful and at this point cheaper.

On Sun, Jun 20, 2021 at 8:09 PM ww_big_al <arknack@...> wrote:

Here is a chart I made up

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Joaquin Pendleton via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2021 8:04 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] collets:

 

how many sizes are there on the er40?  I like the 5c cause there are 72 sizes.  Do you also have a collet block for the er40?
Joaquin


Re: 9" Taper Attachment

david pennington
 

Hi, Webb,

Thanks for the information about installation!

Here are two pictures of the end bracket that fastens to the lathe bed. Note the cotter key in the one. On the other side, the pin has been subjected to a thick coat of paint. Close examination shows it to be knurled.

Mike,

How do I access the files? I may have known at one time, but haven't a clue now.

Thanks,

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:55:55 AM MDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:


Hi There,

On Mon, Jun 21, 2021 at 09:17 AM, david pennington wrote:
"There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function."
Can you give more information?  I have looked at two parts diagrams
for the 9 Inch and 10K taper attachment (Forms 906L and 1406) and
I don't see any "pin" in the "end bracket" (SBL part no: AS864NK1).
 
Are you possibly confusing the "bed bracket" (SBL part no: AS862NK2)?
This is the bracket that bolts to the back of the saddle.  There are two pins
that can be used with it (SBL part no: 160X82) which are 1/4" x 1" long
straight pins. 

When attaching a taper attachment to a lathe, the bed bracket should be
mounted so that the top surface of the swivel bar runs flat and true to the
ways of the bed (there is some play in the mounting holes in the bracket
to allow some minimal movement for alignment).  Once the bracket and
swivel bar are set and running true, one is to drill and ream through the
pin holes in the bed bracket into the saddle and install the two 1/4" x 1"
pins.  Then, if you choose to remove the taper attachment for some
reason, you can use the pins to relocate the bed bracket and avoid the
necessity of re-aligning the bed bracket and swivel bar when re-attaching
the taper attachment.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: collets:

Glen Ruch
 


http://www.cdcotools.com/ only offers 15 different sizes of 3C collets, are you sure you don't have a full set?

Regards.

On 6/20/21 4:40 PM, Joaquin Pendleton via groups.io wrote:
Hello fellow SB machinists:
  I have about 20 3c collets, but want a full set.  I noticed that there is a set of 72 5c collets  at https://www.precisionmatthews.com/shop/72-pc-precision-inch-5-c-collet-set-164-to-1-18/  for $379, but you need an adapter face plate also, another $150.  Or should I go for the ER32 type?  Price is not an object, I just want a fuller set.  Any ideas would be very helpful.  Thanks guys.  Joaquin


Re: 9" Taper Attachment

mike allen
 

        look in the files section of this group

        animal

On 6/21/2021 9:17 AM, david pennington via groups.io wrote:
Hi, Folks,

I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)

I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.

There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.

A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?

B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.

Thanks,

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


Re: 9" Taper Attachment

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

On Mon, Jun 21, 2021 at 09:17 AM, david pennington wrote:
"There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function."
Can you give more information?  I have looked at two parts diagrams
for the 9 Inch and 10K taper attachment (Forms 906L and 1406) and
I don't see any "pin" in the "end bracket" (SBL part no: AS864NK1).
 
Are you possibly confusing the "bed bracket" (SBL part no: AS862NK2)?
This is the bracket that bolts to the back of the saddle.  There are two pins
that can be used with it (SBL part no: 160X82) which are 1/4" x 1" long
straight pins. 

When attaching a taper attachment to a lathe, the bed bracket should be
mounted so that the top surface of the swivel bar runs flat and true to the
ways of the bed (there is some play in the mounting holes in the bracket
to allow some minimal movement for alignment).  Once the bracket and
swivel bar are set and running true, one is to drill and ream through the
pin holes in the bed bracket into the saddle and install the two 1/4" x 1"
pins.  Then, if you choose to remove the taper attachment for some
reason, you can use the pins to relocate the bed bracket and avoid the
necessity of re-aligning the bed bracket and swivel bar when re-attaching
the taper attachment.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


5C collet closer

Ruth Busch
 

I purchased a 1958 South Bend 10L that came with a set of 5C collets.  The lathe has a collet closer lever that mounts on the left of the headstock. 

 

How should I be using the collet closer?  I noticed sometimes when I adjust the closer knob and pull the lever to tighten the collet, it will sort of snap and the stock seem firmly gripped.  Other times I cannot find the snap and grip point when I adjust the knob and pull the lever; this causes me to question if the work is properly gripped.

 

What is going on?


9" Taper Attachment

david pennington
 

Hi, Folks,

I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)

I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.

There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.

A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?

B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.

Thanks,

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


Re: collets:

Rick
 

I have both a SB9A and a SB13.  I have both 3C and 5C for each respectively.  That said, I also made ER40 collet chucks for both lathes.  This lets me use larger sizes on the SB9, and better grip range with much less collets.  They are slower to use than 3C or 5C, but not really an issue in a home shop.  I have also made collet blocks for the ER40 to use in my milling machine vise.


Re: collets:

Thomas Harrold
 

JohnB: exactly right on the grip range.  Go watch youtube video from Joe Pi - he covers collet grip issues, and explains it very well.

 

BTW, for the original poster of this topic: If you have 20 3c collets, you may be close to having a full set.  I rarely see a lathe with more than 15-20.

 

-Tom

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of John
Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2021 10:21 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] collets:

 

Number of collets to cover a given range is dependent on the grip range of the collet.

 

5C do not have a very wide range.

 

I think the ER series has a wider grip range per collet than the 5C.

John B

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Andrei
Sent: 21 June 2021 10:31
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] collets:

 

They go from 2 or 3mm up to 26, I rhink

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.

 


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Joaquin Pendleton via groups.io <joaquinpendleton@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2021 8:03:45 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] collets:

 

how many sizes are there on the er40?  I like the 5c cause there are 72 sizes.  Do you also have a collet block for the er40?
Joaquin


Re: collets:

John
 

Number of collets to cover a given range is dependent on the grip range of the collet.

 

5C do not have a very wide range.

 

I think the ER series has a wider grip range per collet than the 5C.

John B

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Andrei
Sent: 21 June 2021 10:31
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] collets:

 

They go from 2 or 3mm up to 26, I rhink

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.

 


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Joaquin Pendleton via groups.io <joaquinpendleton@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2021 8:03:45 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] collets:

 

how many sizes are there on the er40?  I like the 5c cause there are 72 sizes.  Do you also have a collet block for the er40?
Joaquin


Re: collets:

ww_big_al
 

Here is a chart I made up

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Joaquin Pendleton via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2021 8:04 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] collets:

 

how many sizes are there on the er40?  I like the 5c cause there are 72 sizes.  Do you also have a collet block for the er40?
Joaquin


Re: collets:

Andrei
 

They go from 2 or 3mm up to 26, I rhink

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Joaquin Pendleton via groups.io <joaquinpendleton@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2021 8:03:45 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] collets:
 
how many sizes are there on the er40?  I like the 5c cause there are 72 sizes.  Do you also have a collet block for the er40?
Joaquin


Re: collets:

Joaquin Pendleton
 

how many sizes are there on the er40?  I like the 5c cause there are 72 sizes.  Do you also have a collet block for the er40?
Joaquin


Re: collets:

ww_big_al
 

I have er40 on my 9A. Love it. I think I posted something here on making my adapter  back plate. 

Al Knack

On Jun 20, 2021, at 5:45 PM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:


How about ER40? Depends on what you want to do. 5c does hex and square collets. The ER series doesn't

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Joaquin Pendleton via groups.io <joaquinpendleton@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2021 4:40:02 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] collets:
 
Hello fellow SB machinists:
  I have about 20 3c collets, but want a full set.  I noticed that there is a set of 72 5c collets  at https://www.precisionmatthews.com/shop/72-pc-precision-inch-5-c-collet-set-164-to-1-18/  for $379, but you need an adapter face plate also, another $150.  Or should I go for the ER32 type?  Price is not an object, I just want a fuller set.  Any ideas would be very helpful.  Thanks guys.  Joaquin


Re: collets:

Andrei
 

How about ER40? Depends on what you want to do. 5c does hex and square collets. The ER series doesn't

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Joaquin Pendleton via groups.io <joaquinpendleton@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 20, 2021 4:40:02 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] collets:
 
Hello fellow SB machinists:
  I have about 20 3c collets, but want a full set.  I noticed that there is a set of 72 5c collets  at https://www.precisionmatthews.com/shop/72-pc-precision-inch-5-c-collet-set-164-to-1-18/  for $379, but you need an adapter face plate also, another $150.  Or should I go for the ER32 type?  Price is not an object, I just want a fuller set.  Any ideas would be very helpful.  Thanks guys.  Joaquin


collets:

Joaquin Pendleton
 

Hello fellow SB machinists:
  I have about 20 3c collets, but want a full set.  I noticed that there is a set of 72 5c collets  at https://www.precisionmatthews.com/shop/72-pc-precision-inch-5-c-collet-set-164-to-1-18/  for $379, but you need an adapter face plate also, another $150.  Or should I go for the ER32 type?  Price is not an object, I just want a fuller set.  Any ideas would be very helpful.  Thanks guys.  Joaquin


moderated Re: Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

Bill in OKC too
 

Nobody with any sense trusts my plans. I don't even trust my plans. I mean, look where they've brought me!

;)

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 03:44:29 PM CDT, druid_noibn via groups.io <druid_noibn@...> wrote:


Hi Bill,

Your need to tweak your last sentence to "Trust me - I have a plan...."

Keep going,
DBN aka John

On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 7:32:49 AM EDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


Thank you, Tony! That is enormously helpful! So is the note that the gears are 16DP! That is the same as the change gears on an Atlas, and I can get 3d models of those gears, so could print them!

As of last night, I can get to all my machines. This weekend I hope to get the shop layout set for now,
and then begin an orgy of machine fixing. 

I'll have to build an electrolysis tank to strip the grease, rust, and old paint off the 10L, which shipped in October 1941, so I can get it back together. 

I have the 4-1/2' bed, so I think two of the plastic chemical drums I scavenged from work a couple of years ago will work. Cut the tops out, sew them together with safety wire, cut out a chunk of the side to form a trough, and hang the bed in there from my engine hoist...

I have a plan. I'm getting dangerous!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USeAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 06:09:59 AM CDT, nzpropnut <skilton.adscan@...> wrote:


Bill,

 

The attached photos  and info show the entire package, ex-factory, for the Single Tumbler gearbox Heavy 10 only - my machine is December 1941.

The double tumbler machine uses a different set-up to this - i.e., a different banjo bar and probably some difference with the gear set.

 

Cheers,

Tony Skilton

NZ

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 18, 2021 6:51 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe. They are available for the Atlas, and it's possible to make your own, but I've not seen anything like them for the SB lathes. Also, AFAIK, the SB Heavy 10L lathes all have a quick-change gear box, and that may complicate things, too. I don't know if these for the 10L will work with the older single-tumbler gear boxes, which is what mine shipped with, and it still needs a lot of work before I need to worry about that at all. By the time I have my shop set up the way I want it, I should be able to cut my own gears, so it may not be a problem. I'll just have to figure out how to make it work.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 01:14:13 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

 

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 



Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

 


moderated Re: Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

druid_noibn
 

Hi Bill,

Your need to tweak your last sentence to "Trust me - I have a plan...."

Keep going,
DBN aka John

On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 7:32:49 AM EDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


Thank you, Tony! That is enormously helpful! So is the note that the gears are 16DP! That is the same as the change gears on an Atlas, and I can get 3d models of those gears, so could print them!

As of last night, I can get to all my machines. This weekend I hope to get the shop layout set for now,
and then begin an orgy of machine fixing. 

I'll have to build an electrolysis tank to strip the grease, rust, and old paint off the 10L, which shipped in October 1941, so I can get it back together. 

I have the 4-1/2' bed, so I think two of the plastic chemical drums I scavenged from work a couple of years ago will work. Cut the tops out, sew them together with safety wire, cut out a chunk of the side to form a trough, and hang the bed in there from my engine hoist...

I have a plan. I'm getting dangerous!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USeAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 06:09:59 AM CDT, nzpropnut <skilton.adscan@...> wrote:


Bill,

 

The attached photos  and info show the entire package, ex-factory, for the Single Tumbler gearbox Heavy 10 only - my machine is December 1941.

The double tumbler machine uses a different set-up to this - i.e., a different banjo bar and probably some difference with the gear set.

 

Cheers,

Tony Skilton

NZ

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 18, 2021 6:51 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe. They are available for the Atlas, and it's possible to make your own, but I've not seen anything like them for the SB lathes. Also, AFAIK, the SB Heavy 10L lathes all have a quick-change gear box, and that may complicate things, too. I don't know if these for the 10L will work with the older single-tumbler gear boxes, which is what mine shipped with, and it still needs a lot of work before I need to worry about that at all. By the time I have my shop set up the way I want it, I should be able to cut my own gears, so it may not be a problem. I'll just have to figure out how to make it work.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 01:14:13 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

 

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 



Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

 


moderated Re: Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

Bill in OKC too
 

The ones we've been talking about give perfect metric pitches, 0% error, where Adam's gears have a small error. I'm at least intending to make leadscrews over a foot long, so his gears won't help me, and they aren't for my lathe anyway. I've got a 10L. Anyone who only needs a short metric screw would probably do fine with them, though I've seen 3D printed gears for that purpose for under $100 on Ebay. I bought my own 3D printer so I can learn to make my own. Not that I've gotten there yet.;)

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 06:55:13 AM CDT, ww_big_al <arknack@...> wrote:


Just a FYI. Here is a link for 9A/10K gear set Metric Transposing Gear Set (Metric Change Gears) for Cutting Metric Threads on South Bend 9A and 10K Lathe (monroelawncare.com)

 

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, June 19, 2021 7:32 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Thank you, Tony! That is enormously helpful! So is the note that the gears are 16DP! That is the same as the change gears on an Atlas, and I can get 3d models of those gears, so could print them!

 

As of last night, I can get to all my machines. This weekend I hope to get the shop layout set for now,

and then begin an orgy of machine fixing. 

 

I'll have to build an electrolysis tank to strip the grease, rust, and old paint off the 10L, which shipped in October 1941, so I can get it back together. 

 

I have the 4-1/2' bed, so I think two of the plastic chemical drums I scavenged from work a couple of years ago will work. Cut the tops out, sew them together with safety wire, cut out a chunk of the side to form a trough, and hang the bed in there from my engine hoist...

 

I have a plan. I'm getting dangerous!

 

Bill in OKC

 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USeAF(Ret.)

 

 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)

 

 

 

 

On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 06:09:59 AM CDT, nzpropnut <skilton.adscan@...> wrote:

 

 

Bill,

 

The attached photos  and info show the entire package, ex-factory, for the Single Tumbler gearbox Heavy 10 only - my machine is December 1941.

The double tumbler machine uses a different set-up to this - i.e., a different banjo bar and probably some difference with the gear set.

 

Cheers,

Tony Skilton

NZ

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 18, 2021 6:51 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe. They are available for the Atlas, and it's possible to make your own, but I've not seen anything like them for the SB lathes. Also, AFAIK, the SB Heavy 10L lathes all have a quick-change gear box, and that may complicate things, too. I don't know if these for the 10L will work with the older single-tumbler gear boxes, which is what mine shipped with, and it still needs a lot of work before I need to worry about that at all. By the time I have my shop set up the way I want it, I should be able to cut my own gears, so it may not be a problem. I'll just have to figure out how to make it work.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 01:14:13 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

 

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 



Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

 

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