Date   

Re: Thread dial gear

Anthony Rhodes
 

In a message dated Fri, 25 Apr 2003 23:57:17 -0000, Dave Mucha writes:

<< I am not sure of the gear size, >>

25.13274 DP. Worm pitch (8 TPI of leadscrew) times pi.

<< but if you had an ACME tap of the same size as the lead screw, you could
easily make your won gear. If you wanted to make one of Nylon or Delrin or
PVC, that too would be a piece of cake provided you have the tap.

Barring having a tap, considder making an ACME tap. just thread a steel piece
and then saw or mill the chip grouves. i think wooddragon had a 'how to' on
his site. >>

If you do this make your tap the same size as your leadscrew. If you make it
a larger os smaller OD it will change the helix angle. This has the
additional benefit that in the future you can use the tap for cleaning up
your split nuts or even make new ones.

Anthony
Berkeley, Calif.


Re: Tool holder part needed

Frank Black <frankblack@...>
 

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Mucha" <davemucha@j...>
wrote:
Hi Sam,

The curved round donut thingie actually has a scouped radius kinda
like your cerial bowl that matches the bananna looking thingie.
I wish you guys would quit using such technical language ;-)


that way, when they match the clamping force is straight down and
the tool
does not rotate from either clamping forces or cutter forces.

you might considder a QC tool post if you want to really move up
into
simplier tool changing.
Check out http://www.metalwebnews.com/howto/toolpost/toolpost.html
I've built one, and though it looks like quite a project it's major
improvement over the lantern toolpost. (And in my opinion as good
if not better than the Aloris I have for my 6" Atlas)


The main thing for you is to get the OD of the lantern so you know
the ID of your round donut thingie.

Dave





--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, cbetlyon <cbetlyon@f...>
wrote:
Hi folks,

I'm in need of the little round donut looking thing (I don't
think
that's the
correct term) that goes over the toolpost and under the tool.

If anyone has a spare to sell, I'd appreciate it.

Thanks,

Sam B.
http://www.fireflyarms.com


Re: Tool holder part needed

pjwizr_1999 <pjwizr_1999@...>
 

you could actually cheat around not having one to get you set up to
make one. if you have a thick washer ( doesnt have to be hardened)
then you can use it in a pinch as a base washer for a ( square or
rectangular - I used a couple of tool blanks) spacer used in place of
the curved wedge ( or banana - your choice of nomenclature is your
bid'ness). this will let you hold a tool in the holder and then you
can turn a normal base washer with the radius you want cut into it.
cutting the radius to a perfect contour is not a critical item as it
will quickly get pressed by the wedge, you could easily polish the
new washer by hand ( leave it in the spindle chuck and polish the
radius relief with a handheld dremel or a piece of emery wrapped
around a round stick) As long as you get a fair degree of contact
between the wedge and washer the tool should not slip, the topscrew
is supposed to be fairly snug as this is what maintains the pressure
on the washer. neither the washer nor the wedge need to be really
hard, although some are forged, they always need to have some small
degree of flex to be able to conform to each other - the area of
surface in contact is what lets them hold the position firmly. they
should NOT have grease or lubricating oil on these mating surfaces



"Dave Mucha" <davemucha@j...> wrote:
Hi Sam,
The curved round donut thingie actually has a scouped radius kinda
like your cerial bowl that matches the bananna looking thingie.
that
way, when they match the clamping force is straight down and the
tool
does not rotate from either clamping forces or cutter forces.
The main thing for you is to get the OD of the lantern so you know
the ID of your round donut thingie.


Re: Tool holder part needed

pjwizr_1999 <pjwizr_1999@...>
 

well spake, DM.

I still think the donut and bawama thingie arrangement is quite
serviceable when you find need to quickly change tool angle or some
such variable and dont want to fuss with re-alingning something in a
fixed holder and grinding the tool over and over. the lantern also
lets you use the toolpost as a workholder in a pinch, using the slot
for clamping a small piece or a work holder. I have been know to try
using two at a time to clamp a piece for boring where I couldnt turn
the piece in the chuck. also good for holding things that do not fit
in the squarish shaped slots in other toolholders, its much easier
to trap the item in the slot with shims etc. than to try to clamp it
in the open-sided slot of a QC toolpost. the lantern post is a handy
thing to hang on-to even if it's not the cat's bananas for toolposts.



"Dave Mucha" <davemucha@j...> wrote:
Hi Sam,
when they match the clamping force is straight down and the tool
does not rotate from either clamping forces or cutter forces.
you might considder a QC tool post if you want to really move up
into > simplier tool changing.

The main thing for you is to get the OD of the lantern so you know
the ID of your round donut thingie.


Re: SB & Boxford

Len Smith <parnobal2@...>
 

Maybe the real story was a variant on this, as Boxford didn't start manufacture until 1948. Perhaps the large numbers of SB machines, generously supplied to UK during the war, were put out onto the market, and needed the parts and support in the same way that Anthony suggests here..leading to the agreement. It's also probable that in the depleted economy after the war, parts shipped over from the US would have been too expensive in comparative terms.
Len

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 25, 2003 3:32 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: SB & Boxford

In a message dated Thu, 24 Apr 2003 09:12:11 -0400, Frank writes:

<< Just out of curiosity, does anyone know if Boxford bought a licence from
SB or did they Hong Kong the machine? >>

I don't have the papers on this but it was a WW2 lend lease issue.

Machines were being shipped to the UK for the Brits to be better able to
fight Hitler. Machines required service parts. While SB probably did ship
*some* service parts it's not possible to predict with complete accuracy what
parts will be needed at any particular time. In order not to have machines
inoperative for extended periods of time while waiting for parts from
America, or to rob other parts from inoperative machines (they needed all the
machines they could get) UK sources were authorized to manufacture service
parts. The same thing happened with Atlas lathes and possibly a number of
other makes.

Possibly during the war, and certainly after, the UK sources found themselves
in possession of parts and no machines needing them after the demob but shops
wanting new machines to replace the ones worn out by the war effort. Why not
assemble service parts into complete machines?

I'm reasonably certain that Boxford and the various other clone manufacturers
(check Tony Griffiths' South Bend pages for more info about SB clones) came
to some sort of licensing agreement on this issue. Since then the clone
makers have engineered their own modifications to the original SB designs so
they often have uniquely interesting features different from SB but I think
each of them would graciously and gratefully acknowledge their debt to SB for
having provided them with such an excellent starting point.

Anthony
Berkeley, Calif.


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Re: SB 9A Feed questions

gorvil
 

The star knob engages a clutch. This clutch feature is useful for
turning up to a shoulder. I engage the proper feed gear,
longitudinal or crossfeed, and then turn the clutch knob until the
tool starts moving and maybe a scoche more so it won't hesitate if
the gibs are a bit tighter at one end or the other. I keep one hand
on the knob so I can quickly disengage when the end of the cut is
reached. If you come up to a shoulder and are sleeping on the job
the clutch should start slipping and not ruin your part. I don't
like to depend on this, though.

Some people have reported sticky clutch problems when the apron has
not been cleaned out or flushed with kerosene for 60 years. Make
sure it all works as I described befor you start taking a 1/2
diameter reducing cut on an expensive piece of metal.

Glen Reeser

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "qbox09" <mg.bug@v...> wrote:
I couldn't find this in the How to run books.

When threading I know to use the half nuts to move the carriage.

When turning down stock should you engage the feed lever to start
the cut or engage it first then use the star nut to start and stop
carriage?

Same ? for power cross feed also.


Thread dial gear

M. Ruffin
 

When I recently purchased my 9" lathe the threading dial was
missing, I am going to build me the housing and parts according to
the file in the archives , what I wanted to know was is the worm
gear that goes on the dial available from a standard gear catalog or
must it be made or ordered from Leblond, I kind of figure that the
gear is going to be really expensive to order from Leblond.


Re: Digest Number 903 - Rear cut-off post topic

Bill Collins <bill_collins14@...>
 

Hi ave.The steel I am using is 4140.It's the same metal I make my
cannon barrels from.Thanks and God Bless.
Bill C.


SB 9A Feed questions

qbox09
 

I couldn't find this in the How to run books.

When threading I know to use the half nuts to move the carriage.

When turning down stock should you engage the feed lever to start
the cut or engage it first then use the star nut to start and stop
carriage?

Same ? for power cross feed also.


Re: lathe info

gorvil
 

Hi Bill,

I made a few 20 tooth gears this week to offer to folks on this
list. I bought a set of 18 DP 14.5 degree PA cutters and have been
playing with them to figure out how it all works. Broaching the
keyway turned out to be the most interesting part of the process.

The gears are made of 360 brass and I'll take $20 each for them to
try to recoup the cost of the cutters and the material I bought.

Send me an email directly if you want one.

GOrvil(at)aol.com

Glen Reeser

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "teckman11" <teckman@g...>
wrote:
Hello Man
I have a Model 9b S/N 45273nbr9 can someone help me with date of
manf. and original owner. And Im makeing my model B in to a model
A.
I still need a 20 tooth gear and a lead screw for a 42" bed. can I
cut the lead screw? if so anyone have a print for a lead screw for
a
model A with a 42" bed

Thanks Bill


Re: Digest Number 903 - Rear cut-off post topic

Dave Mucha <davemucha@...>
 

Hi Bill,

I have run the lathe at medium speed and pushed the hacksaw into the
part. makes a much cleaner cut, and less arm work.

You didn't mention material, but lube will go a long way as will the
proper cutting angle. I have some cutoff bits with a very high rake.

Dave




--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Collins"
<bill_collins14@y...> wrote:
Hi JWE.Could you or anyone else on the group tell me what the rear
tool post looks like.I need to cut roundels that fit between the
cheek pieces and tongue on my Civil War style cannon carriages.I
tried to use a cutoff tool to do this from the regular tool post
and
was afraid of the piece climbing up onto the cutoff tool.I
immediately stopped trying this way.I have been cutting the
roundels
by hand with a hacksaw then facing them off in the chuck.This takes
quite a bit of arm power and setup time to cut them by hand since
there are six roundels to each cannon carriage.Any help is greatly
appreciated.Also can the rear tool post be made in the shop easily?
Thanks in advance and God Bless.
Bill C.


Re: threading on 9 A

Dave Mucha <davemucha@...>
 

Hi Rob,

As I re-read your question, it dealt specifically with the back gear.

The normal gearing is set so the motor spins the jackshaft and then
that in turn spins he lathe spindle which in turn spins the gear
train.

with the back gear disengaged, the lathe is running full speed or
high gear. the gear train starts on the back of the spindle and runs
through some different gears. on a Model C or Workshop, you must
manually change the gear ratio to get the thread correct. the label
on the gear cover would indicate what the proper gears to be used are.

The back gear comes into play as reagards to lathe speed. I call it
low gear. the motor spins the jackshaft which spins the step pully
which spins the back-gear which spins the spindle. everything is in
slow motion, but all the thread and feed ratios are unchanged.

Of course you need the stack of gears to know change them.

Also as was pointed out, the half nuts are the ones to use, not the
feed lever.

And regards the thread dial, always start at 1 regarless where you
need to put the carrage or thread pitch and you will find it doesn't
matter for the rest of the thread pitches, or leave the half nuts
engaged and feed the carrage back and forth by reveresing the motor.

HTH

Dave



--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "cantstop47" <rlandes@c...>
wrote:
My " How to run a lathe " does not say. Do you use your back gears
to thread? I,ve tryed eveything I could think of and is still not
coming out right. Have read all kinds of books, and none of them
say. Could anyone give me i.g. on this machine to try? Used thread
dial, and will not cut in the same place. Rob.


Re: Tool holder part needed

Dave Mucha <davemucha@...>
 

Hi Sam,

The curved round donut thingie actually has a scouped radius kinda
like your cerial bowl that matches the bananna looking thingie. that
way, when they match the clamping force is straight down and the tool
does not rotate from either clamping forces or cutter forces.

you might considder a QC tool post if you want to really move up into
simplier tool changing.

The main thing for you is to get the OD of the lantern so you know
the ID of your round donut thingie.

Dave





--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, cbetlyon <cbetlyon@f...> wrote:
Hi folks,

I'm in need of the little round donut looking thing (I don't think
that's the
correct term) that goes over the toolpost and under the tool.

If anyone has a spare to sell, I'd appreciate it.

Thanks,

Sam B.
http://www.fireflyarms.com


Re: To Rose: ser # information request.

Rose Marvin <rmarvin@...>
 

Bob-
Our records indicate that your 11" lathe shipped on 4-7-1937 to the US
Marine Corps in San Diego, CA. Please let me know if you need any other
information.

Thanks,
Rose Marvin
LeBlond Ltd
rmarvin@leblondusa.com

-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Streimikes [SMTP:rjs@tmisnet.com]
Sent: Wednesday, April 23, 2003 12:45 AM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [southbendlathe] To Rose: ser # information request.

<< File: ATT00010.html >>


Re: Beginners Workshop

James W. Early <j.w.early@...>
 

Geometer starts his seven part hints on thread cutting with some of the
basics to correct peoples understanding of the process

JWE
Long Beach, CA


Re: Digest Number 905

catboat15@...
 

In a message dated 4/24/2003 2:50:37 PM Pacific Standard Time, southbendlathe@... writes:


Do you use your back gears
to thread? I,ve tryed eveything I could think of and is still not
coming out right.


Yes, use the back gears specially when you are a beginner. Tool does not track into the same cut?  Check that the thread dial is fully engaged, if it is not the gear may skip a tooth from the lead screw to threading dial.  Keep the lead screw engaged through the full operation (My first attempt at threading I did not do this and had a mess) Make sure of the engagement of the change gears. Atlas (sorry, but that is what I have at present) recomends change gears be set up by putting a sheet of newspaper between gears to give working clearance. (Take the paper out of course) If you have any compound gears in the set up be sure they are keyed together. The process goes this way. Set compound at a mite less than 30 degrees (about 29.5 degrees). Start the lathe in back gear and feed with the cross slide to give only a scratch on the surface of the work. Note the dial setting on the cross slide at this point. (I keep a black board handy for this kind of stuff) When your scratch mark reaches to where you want to end the thread (You did use a parting tool to make a "run out" groove, I hope.) When you reach that spot, disengage the power feed, crank back the cross feed,  use the hand crank to move the carrage back to the start. Feed in the compound about .001 (for a beginner) and crank up the cross slide to your previously noted dial position. Now, when the threading dial comes up to the same mark that you started with engage the power feed again.  (There are rules on where on the thread dial to engage the feed, depending on what thread you are cutting, but for a start to be safe use the same mark on the thread dial and you can not go wrong.) 
John
LBSC Virginia
LBSC Tich
200 some feet of 3.5 inch ground level track


Re: Digest Number 903

Bill Collins <bill_collins14@...>
 

Hi Bill,I have the right type of switch but need someone to hook it
up for me.I won't mess with AC wiring.Don't know enough about
it.Thanks for the reply.
Bill C.


Re: Digest Number 903

Bill Collins <bill_collins14@...>
 

Hi J.S.I really didn't pay attention when I looked at the photo.I
don't have that type of cross slide on my SB.You can see a photo of
my cross slide in my album.Can't rtemember which photo it is you will
have to look.I guess that means I can't use a taper attachment on it
either.Thanks for your help man,I appreciate it.Thanks,God Bless.
Bill C.


Re: Digest Number 903

bill stuart
 

bill,, a regular drum switch for reversing is set up
for 3 phase where switching any two leads will rev.
the motor..single phase 110 or 220 will require
something special such as stackable contacts.. hope
this helps stirboy
--- Bill Collins <bill_collins14@yahoo.com> wrote:
Hi Dennis.I have the original switch box that came
on the lathe with
the wiring diagram still under the cover but I am
not too swift when
it comes to wiring.The motor has terminals also so
the motor can be
reversed from the switch.I will have to get someone
here to wire it
up so I can reverse the motor and direction of the
spindle.Thanks a
lot for your help.Much appreciated,thanks and God
Bless.
Bill C.


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Re: Digest Number 903

JS. EARLY <j.w.early@...>
 

Bill
The message I posted last night had a very good picture of mine attached but
as you get the digest you will need to go to the group site to get it.
JWE
Long Beach, CA

----- Original Message -----
From: Bill Collins <bill_collins14@yahoo.com>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2003 10:27 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Digest Number 903


Hi JWE.Could you or anyone else on the group tell me what the rear
tool post looks like.I need to cut roundels that fit between the
cheek pieces and tongue on my Civil War style cannon carriages.I
tried to use a cutoff tool to do this from the regular tool post and
was afraid of the piece climbing up onto the cutoff tool.I
immediately stopped trying this way.I have been cutting the roundels
by hand with a hacksaw then facing them off in the chuck.This takes
quite a bit of arm power and setup time to cut them by hand since
there are six roundels to each cannon carriage.Any help is greatly
appreciated.Also can the rear tool post be made in the shop easily?
Thanks in advance and God Bless.
Bill C.

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