Date   

Re: Warm left/rear bearing

motopreserveshop
 

Thanks again Webb. The parts list I have seems similar. I don’t see page numbers, but PDF reader shows page 12/13. It is also form 908C. The “description” on the list for small bearing sleeve shows on the line below “11-12-15-16-18-20-21”

I think that’s what was throwing me off. No specific mention of 10 or 13. 

There is no question the previous owner was careless (that may be putting it mildly). I know this is not uncommon, but knowing it never really prevents the frustration :)

We haven’t put the spindle back on the lathe yet to see if the bearing cap reduces the gap. We figured we would get a new thrust bearing before we reinstall it for further assessment. Also, there is no wick on the large bearing expander. Figures it the one that doesn’t fall out on its own! :) so the whole thing needs to come apart. 

The concerning thing is that the play while on the lathe was not progressive. It was a sudden jump of .010. With spindle on the bench and holding the small sleeve tight, same type of sudden jump happens when you pull up/push down. I know this is not a definitive test, but it seems the sleeve may be out-of-round and it suddenly popping to the opposite mating surface. 

Not sure if that makes sense. But it makes me worry that the cap may not be able to fully close the bearing sleeve to round. 

Scott

On Feb 14, 2021, at 8:07 AM, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

Hi There,

In my copy of CE3458, the break-down showing the spindle bearings
and part  numbers is on pages 13 and 14 (Form 908C). 

If your gap in the bearing seems too wide, it is probably because someone
has been removing the bearing cap without unscrewing the expander (which
forces it through the slot).  Also, the bearing may be sprung slightly.  Does the
slot become more narrow when the bearing cap is screwed down?  Then the
bearing has been sprung open by a careless owner at some time.  Hopefully,
it won't cause you any major problems. 

If the slot is still too wide, then you can make a new oversized expander.  It can
be done by careful filing of the dovetail. 

On a side note, did you notice a letter "F" scribed on the bearing shell?  It is
place there to indicate which end of the bearing should be facing front.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Left Side Cover Hinge

david pennington
 

That looks familiar. :)

The knurling on my hinge pin was not exposed. I only became aware of it after drilling out a lot of the lead (or babbitt).

Have you decided how you're going to fix the thing?

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Saturday, February 13, 2021, 08:39:55 PM MST, Payson <egreene104@...> wrote:


Here's my cover. I don't know why the iphone couldn't complete the process.
Payson.Payson.


Restoring a 9A, and a crunched-up worm gear

ThreeReefs
 

Hi All - great to see such an active group.
I'm restoring a 9A which I acquired from a retired engineer (a lot of them seem to come that way !)
He hadn't touched it for about ten years, so plenty of dust and grime, but well-oiled and well-used and a fair bit of tooling with it..
I'm working through the teardown and "How worn is this part?" stages - some early experiences on a UK forum here if you want to look.
The guy was a professional engineer and this was his "home" lathe, hence a few of the accessories are quite unusual including a hydraulic (yes really) variable speed drive and a motor I struggle to lift.

Going pretty well so far, but the apron mechanics are giving me concern because the worm gear is incredibly worn - the teeth are thin and crumbling, like this :


The worm itself seems fine, which is weird.
The half-nuts are very worn but the leadscrew seems in good condition, so I'm not too bothered there, it's not too hard to find good-condition halfnuts or people who will recondition them.
But the worm gear is going to be impossible to repair and quite hard to replace, I suspect. Oddly, there are worms for sale here and there, but no worm gears, which doesn't make a lot of sense because they kind of come in pairs :-)
Finding a 'for spares' apron seems to be the only route, the problem there being that you can't assess the condition of the work gear from photos of the apron - it's hidden.
So :

- Has anyone seen this type of wear on a worm gear ? is it common to have this much wear on the gear but the worm look good ?
- Does it suggest over-use in a particular way, or lack of lubrication  maybe ? There was plenty of oil in the apron when I dismantled it
- If anyone comes across a spare, or even an apron with such a gear in good condition, please let me know !

Thanks - these are lovely lathes and I'm looking forward to getting it running and generating some chips.
Richard


Re: Warm left/rear bearing

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

In my copy of CE3458, the break-down showing the spindle bearings
and part  numbers is on pages 13 and 14 (Form 908C). 

If your gap in the bearing seems too wide, it is probably because someone
has been removing the bearing cap without unscrewing the expander (which
forces it through the slot).  Also, the bearing may be sprung slightly.  Does the
slot become more narrow when the bearing cap is screwed down?  Then the
bearing has been sprung open by a careless owner at some time.  Hopefully,
it won't cause you any major problems. 

If the slot is still too wide, then you can make a new oversized expander.  It can
be done by careful filing of the dovetail. 

On a side note, did you notice a letter "F" scribed on the bearing shell?  It is
place there to indicate which end of the bearing should be facing front.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Warm left/rear bearing

motopreserveshop
 

Thanks Webb. The parts list I have (forget where I got it but it likely originally from you or Steve) is CE3458. It was a little confusing because the bearing parts in the parts list mentions by name just about every lathe except the 10 & 13. 

I shot an email to Ted to see if he might have some stashed away. 

Do you know offhand whether there is any drawbacks to replacing the thrust bearings with more modern version (with correct dimensions of course)? A quick search of eBay showed only 1 available for $50+shipping. Good grief!

The Small bearing on this spindle doesn’t have scoring, but the gap is so big the expander just falls out. Not sure that’s going to be able to be fixed. 

 


Re: Warm left/rear bearing

motopreserveshop
 

Steve,
 
Looks like a cool project, but might I suggest you turn your considerable skills to developing a robotic chip sweeper? :) That floor in front of the mill looks like progress, progress, progress!!!
 
I designed and built a small DIY gantry-style CNC a few years ago - chassis is mostly alum tooling plate and extrusion. THK linear rails and trucks. Cheap import ball screws. Gives me a work zone of about 18x24 which I needed for some of the custom motorcycle parts. A very challenging project, but well worth the effort. And yes, many moments of stepping back, assessing, crying, and then diving back in :)
 
Have you settled on a control software yet?


Re: Warm left/rear bearing

Steve Wells
 

Scott,

You are so right, I’ve been fighting a spindle for a CNC conversion lathe

all month, but just slowing down and taking in one step at a time has really helped

this last week. Got the headstock rebuilt and have three holes to drill tomorrow and I’ll have

the spindle drive custom pulley completed. I ended up having to make most of it as the original

three groove pulley was used to retain the rear bearing inner race. Installing the servo spindle drive

is next so I can run in my new bearings too.

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of motopreserveshop
Sent: Saturday, February 13, 2021 7:57 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Warm left/rear bearing

 

Thanks so much Steve. After all the help here and just digging into it - you realize the intimidation factor doesn’t actually match the task. :)

 

I’ll follow your advice and keep an eye on everything. Keep testing and checking temps. Got a tenth indicator today (nice Swiss Tesa) to do more final/accurate spindle readings. Not sure why I put off getting one so long - but this repair made it the perfect time. 

 

There is an old worn SB13 in my new shop that belongs to my buddy. Sadly, after testing my lathe, he said; “let’s throw the indicator on mine....” .010 out on both ends. Eek!  Opening the thing made mine look spotless! :). Going to require a more thorough rehab for his spindle. 

 

Any idea if the 10L and the 13” (same era I think - mid-50’s with the extended QC) share the same bearing sleeves? I didn’t measure mine before I buttoned it up.  I know the spindle thread is the same, but the rest is very different. I think he may need new sleeves, and one of his thrust washers are itself. 

 

Here we go again!

 

Scott

 



On Feb 13, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Steve Wells <wswells@...> wrote:



Scott,

Good Job, it sounds like your spindle bearing temperatures are becoming homogeneous,

and that is important. Step through the RPM range, giving it a rest between them, like you are doing

and it should be fine, keep checking you temps and after your final hi speed run, make some chips fly!!

 

Steve   

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of motopreserveshop
Sent: Saturday, February 13, 2021 5:39 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Warm left/rear bearing

 

Thanks once again folks. 

 

Since I emailed last, I threw the chuck on it and ran it for about 30 minutes (no cutting) at the 740RPM speed. The small bearing hovered right around 90f. The large/front was still lower, but only by a bit (82f). For sure an improvement from the the first test. Id say the ambient temps have been around 65f in the shop today. 

 

I don’t have the final shim measurements with me. IIRC they were roughly in the .016 area - giving me very near .001 runout on the large  bearing, and a tad under .001 for the small bearing. I will wait to see if I need further changes when I can measure with the tenth indicator. 

 

I will also keep an eye on the temps over the next couple days and projects. I can see fluctuations in ambient temps requiring changes, or at least it effecting initial bearings temps as the oil reacts to the ambient shop temperature. 

 

And the most important thing - no binding so far.  Let’s hope it stays that way!

 

Thanks so much for all your help!!!

 

Scott




On Feb 13, 2021, at 2:56 PM, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

Hi There,

There are several reasons why a bearing will run warmer than another. 
Not the least of which are the clearances in the bearings.  Unfortunately,
the OP hasn't posted his readings.  I understand that a 1/2 thousandths
indicator isn't the best type to use in this situation but if it is the best one
has at the moment...

To discuss why a bearing may run warmer (clearances aside) can be dirt,
burrs, or anything else that might interfere with alignment and clamping
pressure on the bearing shell.  The slightest nick or ding can be the problem.

I will have to disagree with Steve on bearing break-in.  Even though the spindle
has run-in with the current bearings, if the shim packs have been adjusted,
it will change the shape of the bearing and the points of contact will change
(or more correctly, the highs and lows of the bearing will change).  This will
necessitate a certain amount of run-in to even out (depending on the amount 
of change that has taken place).

In my experience, I have adjusted the spindle bearings and brought them
into spec. and then a month later, found that they needed adjustment again.
So, things do change while the spindle runs and subject to vibration and
hot/cold cycling.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Warm left/rear bearing

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

The 10R/10L and the 13" bearings carry different part numbers so they are
not the same but they are the same type of technology.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: 27" South Bend TURN-NADO

sblatheman
 

Jim,
 Your 27” was sold on a military contract to South West Truck (SWT) for an  off-road mobile machine shop.
Most of the 27” were made for the military .

Ted

On Feb 13, 2021, at 6:34 PM, Jim Schwitters <jrschwit@...> wrote:

Ted,
Many thanks.  That clears up a lot.

As an aside, I called SB/Grizzly to get the lathe "build card", but not really expecting success.  They were courteous and helpful, certain that they had cards on file "for every lathe they ever made".  But after a couple days they acknowledged they did not have one for this lathe though they did say the SN (00120SWT) was valid.

Thanks again,
Jim


Re: Warm left/rear bearing

motopreserveshop
 

I figured. Thanks!

On Feb 13, 2021, at 8:14 PM, Steve Wells <wswells@...> wrote:



Scott,

No, not the same as the R, the  T, F and H are different.

 

Steve

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of motopreserveshop
Sent: Saturday, February 13, 2021 7:57 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Warm left/rear bearing

 

Thanks so much Steve. After all the help here and just digging into it - you realize the intimidation factor doesn’t actually match the task. :)

 

I’ll follow your advice and keep an eye on everything. Keep testing and checking temps. Got a tenth indicator today (nice Swiss Tesa) to do more final/accurate spindle readings. Not sure why I put off getting one so long - but this repair made it the perfect time. 

 

There is an old worn SB13 in my new shop that belongs to my buddy. Sadly, after testing my lathe, he said; “let’s throw the indicator on mine....” .010 out on both ends. Eek!  Opening the thing made mine look spotless! :). Going to require a more thorough rehab for his spindle. 

 

Any idea if the 10L and the 13” (same era I think - mid-50’s with the extended QC) share the same bearing sleeves? I didn’t measure mine before I buttoned it up.  I know the spindle thread is the same, but the rest is very different. I think he may need new sleeves, and one of his thrust washers are itself. 

 

Here we go again!

 

Scott

 



On Feb 13, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Steve Wells <wswells@...> wrote:



Scott,

Good Job, it sounds like your spindle bearing temperatures are becoming homogeneous,

and that is important. Step through the RPM range, giving it a rest between them, like you are doing

and it should be fine, keep checking you temps and after your final hi speed run, make some chips fly!!

 

Steve   

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of motopreserveshop
Sent: Saturday, February 13, 2021 5:39 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Warm left/rear bearing

 

Thanks once again folks. 

 

Since I emailed last, I threw the chuck on it and ran it for about 30 minutes (no cutting) at the 740RPM speed. The small bearing hovered right around 90f. The large/front was still lower, but only by a bit (82f). For sure an improvement from the the first test. Id say the ambient temps have been around 65f in the shop today. 

 

I don’t have the final shim measurements with me. IIRC they were roughly in the .016 area - giving me very near .001 runout on the large  bearing, and a tad under .001 for the small bearing. I will wait to see if I need further changes when I can measure with the tenth indicator. 

 

I will also keep an eye on the temps over the next couple days and projects. I can see fluctuations in ambient temps requiring changes, or at least it effecting initial bearings temps as the oil reacts to the ambient shop temperature. 

 

And the most important thing - no binding so far.  Let’s hope it stays that way!

 

Thanks so much for all your help!!!

 

Scott




On Feb 13, 2021, at 2:56 PM, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

Hi There,

There are several reasons why a bearing will run warmer than another. 
Not the least of which are the clearances in the bearings.  Unfortunately,
the OP hasn't posted his readings.  I understand that a 1/2 thousandths
indicator isn't the best type to use in this situation but if it is the best one
has at the moment...

To discuss why a bearing may run warmer (clearances aside) can be dirt,
burrs, or anything else that might interfere with alignment and clamping
pressure on the bearing shell.  The slightest nick or ding can be the problem.

I will have to disagree with Steve on bearing break-in.  Even though the spindle
has run-in with the current bearings, if the shim packs have been adjusted,
it will change the shape of the bearing and the points of contact will change
(or more correctly, the highs and lows of the bearing will change).  This will
necessitate a certain amount of run-in to even out (depending on the amount 
of change that has taken place).

In my experience, I have adjusted the spindle bearings and brought them
into spec. and then a month later, found that they needed adjustment again.
So, things do change while the spindle runs and subject to vibration and
hot/cold cycling.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Warm left/rear bearing

Steve Wells
 

Scott,

No, not the same as the R, the  T, F and H are different.

 

Steve

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of motopreserveshop
Sent: Saturday, February 13, 2021 7:57 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Warm left/rear bearing

 

Thanks so much Steve. After all the help here and just digging into it - you realize the intimidation factor doesn’t actually match the task. :)

 

I’ll follow your advice and keep an eye on everything. Keep testing and checking temps. Got a tenth indicator today (nice Swiss Tesa) to do more final/accurate spindle readings. Not sure why I put off getting one so long - but this repair made it the perfect time. 

 

There is an old worn SB13 in my new shop that belongs to my buddy. Sadly, after testing my lathe, he said; “let’s throw the indicator on mine....” .010 out on both ends. Eek!  Opening the thing made mine look spotless! :). Going to require a more thorough rehab for his spindle. 

 

Any idea if the 10L and the 13” (same era I think - mid-50’s with the extended QC) share the same bearing sleeves? I didn’t measure mine before I buttoned it up.  I know the spindle thread is the same, but the rest is very different. I think he may need new sleeves, and one of his thrust washers are itself. 

 

Here we go again!

 

Scott

 



On Feb 13, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Steve Wells <wswells@...> wrote:



Scott,

Good Job, it sounds like your spindle bearing temperatures are becoming homogeneous,

and that is important. Step through the RPM range, giving it a rest between them, like you are doing

and it should be fine, keep checking you temps and after your final hi speed run, make some chips fly!!

 

Steve   

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of motopreserveshop
Sent: Saturday, February 13, 2021 5:39 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Warm left/rear bearing

 

Thanks once again folks. 

 

Since I emailed last, I threw the chuck on it and ran it for about 30 minutes (no cutting) at the 740RPM speed. The small bearing hovered right around 90f. The large/front was still lower, but only by a bit (82f). For sure an improvement from the the first test. Id say the ambient temps have been around 65f in the shop today. 

 

I don’t have the final shim measurements with me. IIRC they were roughly in the .016 area - giving me very near .001 runout on the large  bearing, and a tad under .001 for the small bearing. I will wait to see if I need further changes when I can measure with the tenth indicator. 

 

I will also keep an eye on the temps over the next couple days and projects. I can see fluctuations in ambient temps requiring changes, or at least it effecting initial bearings temps as the oil reacts to the ambient shop temperature. 

 

And the most important thing - no binding so far.  Let’s hope it stays that way!

 

Thanks so much for all your help!!!

 

Scott




On Feb 13, 2021, at 2:56 PM, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

Hi There,

There are several reasons why a bearing will run warmer than another. 
Not the least of which are the clearances in the bearings.  Unfortunately,
the OP hasn't posted his readings.  I understand that a 1/2 thousandths
indicator isn't the best type to use in this situation but if it is the best one
has at the moment...

To discuss why a bearing may run warmer (clearances aside) can be dirt,
burrs, or anything else that might interfere with alignment and clamping
pressure on the bearing shell.  The slightest nick or ding can be the problem.

I will have to disagree with Steve on bearing break-in.  Even though the spindle
has run-in with the current bearings, if the shim packs have been adjusted,
it will change the shape of the bearing and the points of contact will change
(or more correctly, the highs and lows of the bearing will change).  This will
necessitate a certain amount of run-in to even out (depending on the amount 
of change that has taken place).

In my experience, I have adjusted the spindle bearings and brought them
into spec. and then a month later, found that they needed adjustment again.
So, things do change while the spindle runs and subject to vibration and
hot/cold cycling.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Warm left/rear bearing

motopreserveshop
 

Thanks so much Steve. After all the help here and just digging into it - you realize the intimidation factor doesn’t actually match the task. :)

I’ll follow your advice and keep an eye on everything. Keep testing and checking temps. Got a tenth indicator today (nice Swiss Tesa) to do more final/accurate spindle readings. Not sure why I put off getting one so long - but this repair made it the perfect time. 

There is an old worn SB13 in my new shop that belongs to my buddy. Sadly, after testing my lathe, he said; “let’s throw the indicator on mine....” .010 out on both ends. Eek!  Opening the thing made mine look spotless! :). Going to require a more thorough rehab for his spindle. 

Any idea if the 10L and the 13” (same era I think - mid-50’s with the extended QC) share the same bearing sleeves? I didn’t measure mine before I buttoned it up.  I know the spindle thread is the same, but the rest is very different. I think he may need new sleeves, and one of his thrust washers are itself. 

Here we go again!

Scott


On Feb 13, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Steve Wells <wswells@...> wrote:



Scott,

Good Job, it sounds like your spindle bearing temperatures are becoming homogeneous,

and that is important. Step through the RPM range, giving it a rest between them, like you are doing

and it should be fine, keep checking you temps and after your final hi speed run, make some chips fly!!

 

Steve   

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of motopreserveshop
Sent: Saturday, February 13, 2021 5:39 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Warm left/rear bearing

 

Thanks once again folks. 

 

Since I emailed last, I threw the chuck on it and ran it for about 30 minutes (no cutting) at the 740RPM speed. The small bearing hovered right around 90f. The large/front was still lower, but only by a bit (82f). For sure an improvement from the the first test. Id say the ambient temps have been around 65f in the shop today. 

 

I don’t have the final shim measurements with me. IIRC they were roughly in the .016 area - giving me very near .001 runout on the large  bearing, and a tad under .001 for the small bearing. I will wait to see if I need further changes when I can measure with the tenth indicator. 

 

I will also keep an eye on the temps over the next couple days and projects. I can see fluctuations in ambient temps requiring changes, or at least it effecting initial bearings temps as the oil reacts to the ambient shop temperature. 

 

And the most important thing - no binding so far.  Let’s hope it stays that way!

 

Thanks so much for all your help!!!

 

Scott



On Feb 13, 2021, at 2:56 PM, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

Hi There,

There are several reasons why a bearing will run warmer than another. 
Not the least of which are the clearances in the bearings.  Unfortunately,
the OP hasn't posted his readings.  I understand that a 1/2 thousandths
indicator isn't the best type to use in this situation but if it is the best one
has at the moment...

To discuss why a bearing may run warmer (clearances aside) can be dirt,
burrs, or anything else that might interfere with alignment and clamping
pressure on the bearing shell.  The slightest nick or ding can be the problem.

I will have to disagree with Steve on bearing break-in.  Even though the spindle
has run-in with the current bearings, if the shim packs have been adjusted,
it will change the shape of the bearing and the points of contact will change
(or more correctly, the highs and lows of the bearing will change).  This will
necessitate a certain amount of run-in to even out (depending on the amount 
of change that has taken place).

In my experience, I have adjusted the spindle bearings and brought them
into spec. and then a month later, found that they needed adjustment again.
So, things do change while the spindle runs and subject to vibration and
hot/cold cycling.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Lathe Origins

Jim_B
 

here:


also in the files section is a Hercus folder with their version of HTRAL


On Feb 13, 2021, at 7:46 PM, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:

        so the Turn-Nado thread brought up a question I have . I have seen pic's & read on forums about a Hercules lathes that were made on Australia I believe & look to be South Bend's brother lathes . Any one know what

        the story is ?

        animal








Jim B.





--
Jim B


Lathe Origins

mike allen
 

so the Turn-Nado thread brought up a question I have . I have seen pic's & read on forums about a Hercules lathes that were made on Australia I believe & look to be South Bend's brother lathes . Any one know what

        the story is ?

        animal


Re: Follow rest

mike allen
 

        sorry , only have a follow rest to trade

        animal

On 2/12/2021 8:45 PM, John Amundson via groups.io wrote:
I could use a center rest, if your trading doesn't follow through!


Re: Warm left/rear bearing

Steve Wells
 

Scott,

Good Job, it sounds like your spindle bearing temperatures are becoming homogeneous,

and that is important. Step through the RPM range, giving it a rest between them, like you are doing

and it should be fine, keep checking you temps and after your final hi speed run, make some chips fly!!

 

Steve   

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of motopreserveshop
Sent: Saturday, February 13, 2021 5:39 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Warm left/rear bearing

 

Thanks once again folks. 

 

Since I emailed last, I threw the chuck on it and ran it for about 30 minutes (no cutting) at the 740RPM speed. The small bearing hovered right around 90f. The large/front was still lower, but only by a bit (82f). For sure an improvement from the the first test. Id say the ambient temps have been around 65f in the shop today. 

 

I don’t have the final shim measurements with me. IIRC they were roughly in the .016 area - giving me very near .001 runout on the large  bearing, and a tad under .001 for the small bearing. I will wait to see if I need further changes when I can measure with the tenth indicator. 

 

I will also keep an eye on the temps over the next couple days and projects. I can see fluctuations in ambient temps requiring changes, or at least it effecting initial bearings temps as the oil reacts to the ambient shop temperature. 

 

And the most important thing - no binding so far.  Let’s hope it stays that way!

 

Thanks so much for all your help!!!

 

Scott



On Feb 13, 2021, at 2:56 PM, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

Hi There,

There are several reasons why a bearing will run warmer than another. 
Not the least of which are the clearances in the bearings.  Unfortunately,
the OP hasn't posted his readings.  I understand that a 1/2 thousandths
indicator isn't the best type to use in this situation but if it is the best one
has at the moment...

To discuss why a bearing may run warmer (clearances aside) can be dirt,
burrs, or anything else that might interfere with alignment and clamping
pressure on the bearing shell.  The slightest nick or ding can be the problem.

I will have to disagree with Steve on bearing break-in.  Even though the spindle
has run-in with the current bearings, if the shim packs have been adjusted,
it will change the shape of the bearing and the points of contact will change
(or more correctly, the highs and lows of the bearing will change).  This will
necessitate a certain amount of run-in to even out (depending on the amount 
of change that has taken place).

In my experience, I have adjusted the spindle bearings and brought them
into spec. and then a month later, found that they needed adjustment again.
So, things do change while the spindle runs and subject to vibration and
hot/cold cycling.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: 27" South Bend TURN-NADO

Jim Schwitters
 

Ted,
Many thanks.  That clears up a lot.

As an aside, I called SB/Grizzly to get the lathe "build card", but not really expecting success.  They were courteous and helpful, certain that they had cards on file "for every lathe they ever made".  But after a couple days they acknowledged they did not have one for this lathe though they did say the SN (00120SWT) was valid.

Thanks again,
Jim


Re: Warm left/rear bearing

motopreserveshop
 

Thanks once again folks. 

Since I emailed last, I threw the chuck on it and ran it for about 30 minutes (no cutting) at the 740RPM speed. The small bearing hovered right around 90f. The large/front was still lower, but only by a bit (82f). For sure an improvement from the the first test. Id say the ambient temps have been around 65f in the shop today. 

I don’t have the final shim measurements with me. IIRC they were roughly in the .016 area - giving me very near .001 runout on the large  bearing, and a tad under .001 for the small bearing. I will wait to see if I need further changes when I can measure with the tenth indicator. 

I will also keep an eye on the temps over the next couple days and projects. I can see fluctuations in ambient temps requiring changes, or at least it effecting initial bearings temps as the oil reacts to the ambient shop temperature. 

And the most important thing - no binding so far.  Let’s hope it stays that way!

Thanks so much for all your help!!!

Scott

On Feb 13, 2021, at 2:56 PM, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

Hi There,

There are several reasons why a bearing will run warmer than another. 
Not the least of which are the clearances in the bearings.  Unfortunately,
the OP hasn't posted his readings.  I understand that a 1/2 thousandths
indicator isn't the best type to use in this situation but if it is the best one
has at the moment...

To discuss why a bearing may run warmer (clearances aside) can be dirt,
burrs, or anything else that might interfere with alignment and clamping
pressure on the bearing shell.  The slightest nick or ding can be the problem.

I will have to disagree with Steve on bearing break-in.  Even though the spindle
has run-in with the current bearings, if the shim packs have been adjusted,
it will change the shape of the bearing and the points of contact will change
(or more correctly, the highs and lows of the bearing will change).  This will
necessitate a certain amount of run-in to even out (depending on the amount 
of change that has taken place).

In my experience, I have adjusted the spindle bearings and brought them
into spec. and then a month later, found that they needed adjustment again.
So, things do change while the spindle runs and subject to vibration and
hot/cold cycling.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: 27" South Bend TURN-NADO

m. allan noah
 



On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 3:53 PM glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...> wrote:


So it seems, anybody that reports a SB made in Europe, Asia or elsewhere simply is repeating a nonsensical claim, or is describing a pirated copycat of some sort.


Nonsense. Ted just told you about the later Asian made Turnados, plus there was a rebadged Hercus, and those Korean made 10Ks, and others.

allan

--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: 27" South Bend TURN-NADO

James Rice
 

That explains the Turnado at the plant being different from the Turnado at the college.  Different vintages, different manufacturers.  

Thanks, Ted.

On Sat, Feb 13, 2021 at 2:23 PM sblatheman via groups.io <latheman2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
The 17”, 20”, & 27” Turnados were made in South Bend up until circa 1993. That year, SBL was sold out of bankruptcy to the guy that owned Republic Lagun. He started using the Turnado name on the machines he imported from Taiwan. They looked nothing like the originals and were 14”, 16”, 18”, and 21 or 22”?

Ted

On Feb 13, 2021, at 2:50 PM, Jim Schwitters <jrschwit@...> wrote:

Ted,
Thanks for the reply.  I was hopeful that you would add your expertise.

I'll take your answer at face value, but could you please clarify some of the confusion around where Turn-nados were built.  I've spent a good bit of time reading on the web and various sources claim built in Belgium, Spain, France, Italy and Taiwan, though no source of the info inspires confidence.  I'm specifically referring to 17" lathes made prior to , say, 1990.  17" because this looks exactly like 17s that I have seen pictured except for what look like 5" risers to the headstock, compound, and tailstock making it 27" swing.

Bottom line, it does not really matter to me where this was made since it looks like a good machine.  Really just looking for accurate knowledge.  BTW, this lathe has a two-speed UK made motor with 10/5 Hp.  More Hp than the 7.5 that I have seen on 17" presumably because of the added swing.
Regards,
Jim

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