Date   

Re: Getting my SB 9C working

mike allen
 

        Mark , It's really not a big deal to pull the spindle . You should make sure that you have new felts for a machine that sat that long . You can get the felts in a set for the whole lathe & then some & a book that walks you

        through the process . You will be glad you , alot cheaper than buying a new spindle & headstock

        https://www.amazon.com/South-Bend-Lathe-Rebuild-Kit/dp/B01K4Z686K/ref=sr_1_11?dchild=1&keywords=south+bend+9c+Lathe+rebuild+manual&qid=1608171634&sr=8-11

        animal

On 12/16/2020 5:58 PM, Mark Moulding wrote:
My father bought this South Bend 9C, possibly new or with some demo deal (as he had almost no money at the time), around 1940.  I purchased the serial card from Grizzly, and it all matches up except, oddly, the length of the bed (the card says 3', but it's actually 3-1/2'); since the serial number is on the bed, it's hard to understand that mismatch.

Regardless, he used it for a while, then while I was growing up we'd make a few projects with me "helping" (I was around 10 to 15 at the time).  He died, far too young at 55, in 1980, and the lathe had a tarp thrown over it.  There it sat at my mother's house until she died about a year ago (at 96).  I cleaned out her house, and put it in a storage unit for the next year.  The unit was fairly near the waterfront in the San Francisco bay area, but when I stored it I drenched everything with BoeShield.  Now I've moved it up to my new (heated, dehumidified) shop in Oregon, and one of my first retirement projects is to get it working again.

Amazingly, there is essentially no rust anywhere.  The exposed iron and steel has darkened a bit, but appears to be in good shape.  Because I know its entire history, I'm certain that it wasn't mechanically mistreated, so it shouldn't be too difficult to bring back to life.  I've mounted the lathe and motor on a new table, and replaced the leather drive belt with a new one - the V-belt, although aged, still appears to be usable.  But there seems to be a problem...

The main spindle won't turn.  If I disengage the back gears and pull the locking pin, the cone pulley spins fairly freely, but I've been unable to get the spindle to move.  I also disengaged the change gear reversing gears, to no effect - it's the spindle itself that's really locked up solidly.  I feel as though it must just be dried lubricant on the bearings, because it was working when stored, but if so it's a lot more locked-up than I would have expected.  I tried mounting a 10-inch faceplate, and even with that I couldn't apply enough torque to break it free (I may be retired, but I'm not too feeble yet...).  I stopped short of putting a pipe wrench on it, but just barely...

Any other ideas about what I should try, before breaking down and disassembling the whole thing (which I've been trying to avoid)?  And once I get it moving, any recommendations for chemicals and methods to clean off the 50 years of crud?  I already have a rebuild kit (felts and such-like) and a kit of oils, but I'd like to get it cleaned up first.

(I'm still moving into the shop - please forgive all the boxes in the background...)


~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


Re: Getting my SB 9C working

Jim_B
 

Are you I back Gear?????
I don’t see the handle. 
It’s on the back of the head stock. 
Parallel to the spindle. 
It has two gears, one on either end. 
One engages the spindle gears, the other the bull gear. 
With the pin engaged and the back gear engaged the spindle is locked. 


-8
Jim B,

On Dec 16, 2020, at 8:58 PM, Mark Moulding <mark@...> wrote:

My father bought this South Bend 9C, possibly new or with some demo deal (as he had almost no money at the time), around 1940.  I purchased the serial card from Grizzly, and it all matches up except, oddly, the length of the bed (the card says 3', but it's actually 3-1/2'); since the serial number is on the bed, it's hard to understand that mismatch.

Regardless, he used it for a while, then while I was growing up we'd make a few projects with me "helping" (I was around 10 to 15 at the time).  He died, far too young at 55, in 1980, and the lathe had a tarp thrown over it.  There it sat at my mother's house until she died about a year ago (at 96).  I cleaned out her house, and put it in a storage unit for the next year.  The unit was fairly near the waterfront in the San Francisco bay area, but when I stored it I drenched everything with BoeShield.  Now I've moved it up to my new (heated, dehumidified) shop in Oregon, and one of my first retirement projects is to get it working again.

Amazingly, there is essentially no rust anywhere.  The exposed iron and steel has darkened a bit, but appears to be in good shape.  Because I know its entire history, I'm certain that it wasn't mechanically mistreated, so it shouldn't be too difficult to bring back to life.  I've mounted the lathe and motor on a new table, and replaced the leather drive belt with a new one - the V-belt, although aged, still appears to be usable.  But there seems to be a problem...

The main spindle won't turn.  If I disengage the back gears and pull the locking pin, the cone pulley spins fairly freely, but I've been unable to get the spindle to move.  I also disengaged the change gear reversing gears, to no effect - it's the spindle itself that's really locked up solidly.  I feel as though it must just be dried lubricant on the bearings, because it was working when stored, but if so it's a lot more locked-up than I would have expected.  I tried mounting a 10-inch faceplate, and even with that I couldn't apply enough torque to break it free (I may be retired, but I'm not too feeble yet...).  I stopped short of putting a pipe wrench on it, but just barely...

Any other ideas about what I should try, before breaking down and disassembling the whole thing (which I've been trying to avoid)?  And once I get it moving, any recommendations for chemicals and methods to clean off the 50 years of crud?  I already have a rebuild kit (felts and such-like) and a kit of oils, but I'd like to get it cleaned up first.

(I'm still moving into the shop - please forgive all the boxes in the background...)

<20201216_165137.jpg>

~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


--
Jim B


Getting my SB 9C working

Mark Moulding
 

My father bought this South Bend 9C, possibly new or with some demo deal (as he had almost no money at the time), around 1940.  I purchased the serial card from Grizzly, and it all matches up except, oddly, the length of the bed (the card says 3', but it's actually 3-1/2'); since the serial number is on the bed, it's hard to understand that mismatch.

Regardless, he used it for a while, then while I was growing up we'd make a few projects with me "helping" (I was around 10 to 15 at the time).  He died, far too young at 55, in 1980, and the lathe had a tarp thrown over it.  There it sat at my mother's house until she died about a year ago (at 96).  I cleaned out her house, and put it in a storage unit for the next year.  The unit was fairly near the waterfront in the San Francisco bay area, but when I stored it I drenched everything with BoeShield.  Now I've moved it up to my new (heated, dehumidified) shop in Oregon, and one of my first retirement projects is to get it working again.

Amazingly, there is essentially no rust anywhere.  The exposed iron and steel has darkened a bit, but appears to be in good shape.  Because I know its entire history, I'm certain that it wasn't mechanically mistreated, so it shouldn't be too difficult to bring back to life.  I've mounted the lathe and motor on a new table, and replaced the leather drive belt with a new one - the V-belt, although aged, still appears to be usable.  But there seems to be a problem...

The main spindle won't turn.  If I disengage the back gears and pull the locking pin, the cone pulley spins fairly freely, but I've been unable to get the spindle to move.  I also disengaged the change gear reversing gears, to no effect - it's the spindle itself that's really locked up solidly.  I feel as though it must just be dried lubricant on the bearings, because it was working when stored, but if so it's a lot more locked-up than I would have expected.  I tried mounting a 10-inch faceplate, and even with that I couldn't apply enough torque to break it free (I may be retired, but I'm not too feeble yet...).  I stopped short of putting a pipe wrench on it, but just barely...

Any other ideas about what I should try, before breaking down and disassembling the whole thing (which I've been trying to avoid)?  And once I get it moving, any recommendations for chemicals and methods to clean off the 50 years of crud?  I already have a rebuild kit (felts and such-like) and a kit of oils, but I'd like to get it cleaned up first.

(I'm still moving into the shop - please forgive all the boxes in the background...)


~~

Mark Moulding
South Bend 9" Model C, Walker Turner drill press, Rong Fu table-top mill, "Mini" lathe, a whole bunch of Shopsmith gear


Re: missing bolts for 9"/10k milling attachment 827NK1

Kenneth Beesley
 

Many thanks to David, George, and all who responded to my question.

Ken


Re: missing bolts for 9"/10k milling attachment 827NK1

david pennington
 

Thanks for the additional information, George.

Your response reminded me that there are a host of options at the hardware store, and that the original bolts are unplated, uncoated, plain steel hex head cap screws. The washers--I have fair reason to believe mine are original--are also not plated and are of modest thickness. 

In general, I have a preference for socket head cap screws and thick, precision washers. While I won't replace the bolts on my milling attachment, since they are in good condition, were some elf to make off with them, I'd yield to my preference.

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744 - Please note the new number.


On Tuesday, December 15, 2020, 09:29:51 AM MST, George Meinschein <bustedguns@...> wrote:


+1 on what David said.  If I did all my checking correctly, South Bend part# is 112x120, which is a commercially available 5/16-18 x 1-1/4" hex head cap screw.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

WANTED: Bent, busted, rusted, and/or generally dysfunctional "C&R Eligible" firearms

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Email: bustedguns@...
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
www.meinscheinengineering.com
On 12/15/2020 1:35 AM, david pennington via groups.io wrote:
On the SB milling attachment for my 9C, those two bolts are 5/16 x 1.25, coarse thread.

I don't know the part number for my attachment.

The width of the "vise" is 3", and the opening is about 1.125", with the insert removed. The two bolts are spaced 1.625".

-------- Original message --------
From: Kenneth Beesley <krbeesley@...>
Date: 12/14/20 21:02 (GMT-07:00)
To: SouthBend Lathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] missing bolts for 9"/10k milling attachment 827NK1

Dear Group,

I have a milling attachment 827NK1 for my SB 10k lathe,
but it’s missing the two bolts shown in the following photo.



If some kind soul could identify for me the dimensions of these
bolts (diameter of shaft, length of shaft, and thread pitch) I would be
most grateful.

Best wishes to all,

Ken

*******************************
Kenneth R. Beesley, D.Phil.
PO Box 540475
North Salt Lake UT 84054
USA







Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: missing bolts for 9"/10k milling attachment 827NK1

George Meinschein
 

+1 on what David said.  If I did all my checking correctly, South Bend part# is 112x120, which is a commercially available 5/16-18 x 1-1/4" hex head cap screw.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

WANTED: Bent, busted, rusted, and/or generally dysfunctional "C&R Eligible" firearms

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Email: bustedguns@...
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
www.meinscheinengineering.com
On 12/15/2020 1:35 AM, david pennington via groups.io wrote:
On the SB milling attachment for my 9C, those two bolts are 5/16 x 1.25, coarse thread.

I don't know the part number for my attachment.

The width of the "vise" is 3", and the opening is about 1.125", with the insert removed. The two bolts are spaced 1.625".

-------- Original message --------
From: Kenneth Beesley <krbeesley@...>
Date: 12/14/20 21:02 (GMT-07:00)
To: SouthBend Lathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] missing bolts for 9"/10k milling attachment 827NK1

Dear Group,

I have a milling attachment 827NK1 for my SB 10k lathe,
but it’s missing the two bolts shown in the following photo.



If some kind soul could identify for me the dimensions of these
bolts (diameter of shaft, length of shaft, and thread pitch) I would be
most grateful.

Best wishes to all,

Ken

*******************************
Kenneth R. Beesley, D.Phil.
PO Box 540475
North Salt Lake UT 84054
USA







Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: missing bolts for 9"/10k milling attachment 827NK1

david pennington
 

On the SB milling attachment for my 9C, those two bolts are 5/16 x 1.25, coarse thread.

I don't know the part number for my attachment.

The width of the "vise" is 3", and the opening is about 1.125", with the insert removed. The two bolts are spaced 1.625".

-------- Original message --------
From: Kenneth Beesley <krbeesley@...>
Date: 12/14/20 21:02 (GMT-07:00)
To: SouthBend Lathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] missing bolts for 9"/10k milling attachment 827NK1

Dear Group,

I have a milling attachment 827NK1 for my SB 10k lathe,
but it’s missing the two bolts shown in the following photo.



If some kind soul could identify for me the dimensions of these
bolts (diameter of shaft, length of shaft, and thread pitch) I would be
most grateful.

Best wishes to all,

Ken

*******************************
Kenneth R. Beesley, D.Phil.
PO Box 540475
North Salt Lake UT 84054
USA







Re: missing bolts for 9"/10k milling attachment 827NK1

David R8
 

I have one of those. I’ll dig it out and see if it has the bolts. 

David

On Dec 14, 2020, at 8:02 PM, Kenneth Beesley <krbeesley@...> wrote:


Dear Group,

I have a milling attachment 827NK1 for my SB 10k lathe,
but it’s missing the two bolts shown in the following photo.


<$_0.JPG>

If some kind soul could identify for me the dimensions of these
bolts (diameter of shaft, length of shaft, and thread pitch) I would be
most grateful.

Best wishes to all,

Ken

*******************************
Kenneth R. Beesley, D.Phil.
PO Box 540475
North Salt Lake UT 84054
USA







missing bolts for 9"/10k milling attachment 827NK1

Kenneth Beesley
 

Dear Group,

I have a milling attachment 827NK1 for my SB 10k lathe,
but it’s missing the two bolts shown in the following photo.



If some kind soul could identify for me the dimensions of these
bolts (diameter of shaft, length of shaft, and thread pitch) I would be
most grateful.

Best wishes to all,

Ken

*******************************
Kenneth R. Beesley, D.Phil.
PO Box 540475
North Salt Lake UT 84054
USA







Re: Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys

john kling
 

I have a 415 (converted to an A). On this machine and many of the early ones, there is but a single pulley (i.e. one  step or speed) between the motor and counter shaft so the benefit from easier shifting does not exist.

On Friday, December 11, 2020, 12:38:03 AM EST, Milan Trcka <milan.v.trcka@...> wrote:


I confirm (on my 9A) that the flat countershaft pulley makes changing speeds much easier (almost pleasant). I also find that the V belt needs to be quite accurate and straight otherwise it wanders side to side and tends to rub on one side. This happens especially when the belt is cold. I had to "file" the belt sides to straighten its tracking. Countershaft alignment is also important.
Milan


Re: Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys

glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
 

I have a couple of lathes with these three speed countershaft pulley’s: a SB 9x48” and and an old 1919 7x36” Dalton.  If you run grooved automotive flat belts on the pulley’s you won’t have any trouble. The countershaft pulley’s are all made with a slight crown that aides in self centering.  The only v belt I use connects the drive motor pulley with the large counter shaft drive pulley.

Glenn B.


On Dec 10, 2020, at 9:37 PM, Milan Trcka <milan.v.trcka@...> wrote:

I confirm (on my 9A) that the flat countershaft pulley makes changing speeds much easier (almost pleasant). I also find that the V belt needs to be quite accurate and straight otherwise it wanders side to side and tends to rub on one side. This happens especially when the belt is cold. I had to "file" the belt sides to straighten its tracking. Countershaft alignment is also important.
Milan


Re: Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys

Milan Trcka
 

I confirm (on my 9A) that the flat countershaft pulley makes changing speeds much easier (almost pleasant). I also find that the V belt needs to be quite accurate and straight otherwise it wanders side to side and tends to rub on one side. This happens especially when the belt is cold. I had to "file" the belt sides to straighten its tracking. Countershaft alignment is also important.
Milan


Re: Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys

john kling
 

Thanks for the understanding of the probable motivation for the  design. I have an atlas lathe (also) that has V pulleys on both ends of the motor to counter shaft connection. The large pulley was damaged and I replaced it with a flat pulley of a logan (and it works). The motor on the atlas is on a hinge so shiffting step is relatively easy.

On Thursday, December 10, 2020, 11:55:24 AM EST, David R8 <davidwrate1@...> wrote:


I have a 1975 SB10K with the original countershaft system and guard. It has a two step v-groove motor pulley, flat countershaft pulley and cone pulleys. 
I think part of the reason for the flat countershaft is ease of changing v-belt positions because it is a royal pain in the behind to loosen the motor mount to release belt tension.
But with the flat countershaft, the belt can be eased off the side of the countershaft and moved without releasing the tension.
David

On Dec 10, 2020, at 8:42 AM, john kling via groups.io <jkling222@...> wrote:

The manufacture's decision to have a v belt run (on one side) on a large flat  pulley is counter intuitive. Several other manufactures also used this set up. When i noticed that a new to me SB had this set up. I assumed it was a previous owners set up/ mistake. Perhaps a large v pulley  was expansion or increases friction from the side of the belt.

On Thursday, December 10, 2020, 11:34:37 AM EST, E A <b-arch@...> wrote:


Now if I could only find one of those flat countershaft pulleys, I'd be in like Flynn.
Erik A


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of comstock_friend <jfriend314@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 10:55 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys
 
Here are the South Bend Forms for the belts and pulleys, and the horizontal and underdrive for 9" and 10K lathes. Also the speed chard from my HTRAL.

Note that while the motor pulleys are V-pulleys, the countershaft is flat. The V-Belt runs on it perfectly.

John


Re: Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys

David R8
 

I have a 1975 SB10K with the original countershaft system and guard. It has a two step v-groove motor pulley, flat countershaft pulley and cone pulleys. 
I think part of the reason for the flat countershaft is ease of changing v-belt positions because it is a royal pain in the behind to loosen the motor mount to release belt tension.
But with the flat countershaft, the belt can be eased off the side of the countershaft and moved without releasing the tension.
David

On Dec 10, 2020, at 8:42 AM, john kling via groups.io <jkling222@...> wrote:

The manufacture's decision to have a v belt run (on one side) on a large flat  pulley is counter intuitive. Several other manufactures also used this set up. When i noticed that a new to me SB had this set up. I assumed it was a previous owners set up/ mistake. Perhaps a large v pulley  was expansion or increases friction from the side of the belt.

On Thursday, December 10, 2020, 11:34:37 AM EST, E A <b-arch@...> wrote:


Now if I could only find one of those flat countershaft pulleys, I'd be in like Flynn.
Erik A


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of comstock_friend <jfriend314@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 10:55 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys
 
Here are the South Bend Forms for the belts and pulleys, and the horizontal and underdrive for 9" and 10K lathes. Also the speed chard from my HTRAL.

Note that while the motor pulleys are V-pulleys, the countershaft is flat. The V-Belt runs on it perfectly.

John


Re: Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys

E A
 

Doesn't the large flat pulley allow you to move the belt easily between the two sizes? Otherwise you have to stretch it over the Vee "sides"...
Erik A


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of john kling via groups.io <jkling222@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 10, 2020 11:42 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys
 
The manufacture's decision to have a v belt run (on one side) on a large flat  pulley is counter intuitive. Several other manufactures also used this set up. When i noticed that a new to me SB had this set up. I assumed it was a previous owners set up/ mistake. Perhaps a large v pulley  was expansion or increases friction from the side of the belt.

On Thursday, December 10, 2020, 11:34:37 AM EST, E A <b-arch@...> wrote:


Now if I could only find one of those flat countershaft pulleys, I'd be in like Flynn.
Erik A


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of comstock_friend <jfriend314@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 10:55 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys
 
Here are the South Bend Forms for the belts and pulleys, and the horizontal and underdrive for 9" and 10K lathes. Also the speed chard from my HTRAL.

Note that while the motor pulleys are V-pulleys, the countershaft is flat. The V-Belt runs on it perfectly.

John


Re: Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys

john kling
 

The manufacture's decision to have a v belt run (on one side) on a large flat  pulley is counter intuitive. Several other manufactures also used this set up. When i noticed that a new to me SB had this set up. I assumed it was a previous owners set up/ mistake. Perhaps a large v pulley  was expansion or increases friction from the side of the belt.

On Thursday, December 10, 2020, 11:34:37 AM EST, E A <b-arch@...> wrote:


Now if I could only find one of those flat countershaft pulleys, I'd be in like Flynn.
Erik A


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of comstock_friend <jfriend314@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 10:55 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys
 
Here are the South Bend Forms for the belts and pulleys, and the horizontal and underdrive for 9" and 10K lathes. Also the speed chard from my HTRAL.

Note that while the motor pulleys are V-pulleys, the countershaft is flat. The V-Belt runs on it perfectly.

John


Re: Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys

E A
 

Now if I could only find one of those flat countershaft pulleys, I'd be in like Flynn.
Erik A


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of comstock_friend <jfriend314@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 9, 2020 10:55 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys
 
Here are the South Bend Forms for the belts and pulleys, and the horizontal and underdrive for 9" and 10K lathes. Also the speed chard from my HTRAL.

Note that while the motor pulleys are V-pulleys, the countershaft is flat. The V-Belt runs on it perfectly.

John


Re: Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys

comstock_friend
 

The spindle speed chart doesn't show up well, here it is in pdf...

John


Re: Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys

comstock_friend
 

Here are the South Bend Forms for the belts and pulleys, and the horizontal and underdrive for 9" and 10K lathes. Also the speed chard from my HTRAL.

Note that while the motor pulleys are V-pulleys, the countershaft is flat. The V-Belt runs on it perfectly.

John


Re: Lathe horizontal drive motor and pulleys

Ray De Jong
 

Interesting; I have two of the stock pulleys and both the one on my lathe and the spare have 5/8 bore. the original motor on my 10K has of course the 5/8 shaft.
I used to have a 1948 9 inch SB and still have the original motor and it also is 5/8" as well. The later 10L etc. may be 3/4" shaft/pulley but there are options listed, some 3PH and single phase 1/2 and 3/4 HP.
My spare pulley is listed as having a 3/4" bore but in fact is 5/8"
Strange is often, me thinks.
Ray

On Tuesday, December 8, 2020, 8:23:48 AM PST, E A <b-arch@...> wrote:


As I sort out my "new" 1942 9A, and look at pictures of many others, it hit me that the drive pulleys on mine have been replaced (along with the motor of course).
Motor shaft measures 1/2"... So, Ebay has a number of the motor pulleys listed, but all say they are for 3/4" shaft...? That seems like a big shaft!
(And I have not seen one of the larger two step pulleys so far.)
Questions... what was the original motor shaft size, and is it worth attempting to find original pulleys to have the extra speed options?
Erik A

1921 - 1940 of 105508