Date   

Re: Oil help

engmaxx
 

Both SAE10 and SAE30 non-detergent oil can be readily purchased at Canadian Tire in 1 litre containers.  I mention the SAE30 because you will need SAE20 (SouthBend:  Type C oil) for most oil points outside of the spindle and countershaft.  You can either buy it as 3-in-1 oil for 1/4 hp motors in the little plastic bottle (available everywhere including Canadian Tire but expensive) or make it yourself.  To make it yourself, mix it in these ratios:  SAE30 at 65% with SAE10 at 35%.  Example:  to make 40 mL use 26 mL 30W and 14 mL 10W.  Note it is not a linear combination of oil weights which is why you cannot mix them 30W and 10W at 50/50 to get 20W.  Hope this helps.


Re: Oil help

Roger Bickers
 

I needed some chainsaw bar oil this weekend, and noticed for the first time ever that a particular brand had a weight listing on it..much to my surprise its 10wt.  $12.00 (usd ) wasnt a bad price either compared to some other 10wts I've seen. Roger 


On Mon, Mar 23, 2020 at 1:47 PM, carbure2003
<guycad@...> wrote:
Spindle oil is specified as SAE10 non detergent oil. This can be found at Canadian tire
 
for ways oil I am currently using chain saw bar oil that have similar texture as ways oil seen on youtube. I use summer grade
 

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "John Dammeyer" <johnd@...>
To: <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Oil help
Date: Mon, 23 Mar 2020 08:59:40 -0700

Where does one buy those in Canada?

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Fred Flintstone via Groups.Io
Sent: March-23-20 8:53 AM
To: southbendlathe@groups.io; SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Oil help

 

Thank you,

 

I will give it a shot.

 

 

 

On Monday, March 23, 2020, 4:41:25 PM GMT+2, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:

 

 

ISO 68 and ISO 32 are hydraulic oils that are commonly sold at tractor shops. I’ve purchase all 3 oils in low volume from amazon. 


<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

On Mar 23, 2020, at 05:00, Fred Flintstone via Groups.Io <stoeger666@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,

 

I hope you are staying well,

 

While I am at home and enjoying my lathe I am running low on oil, can some one tell me the European equivalent of the oils below?:

 

 

 

  South Bend Lathe "A" type oil, which is Mobile Velocite #10 spindle lubricant. This will be used in the headstock spindle
                        bearings.

  South Bend Lathe "B" type oil.  which is Mobil DTE 24 (ISO 32), which will be used in your gearbox.


  South Bend Lathe "C" type oil,  which is Mobil DTE Heavy/Medium (ISO 68), which will be used to lubricate "everything else".
                        (that would be screws, external gears, tailstock, etc.)

  South Bend Way Oil, which is Mobil Vactra #2 Way Oil, which will be used to lubricate the sliding Way surfaces of the lathe,
                        (The ways, compound and cross slide).

 

 

 

Or if there is now better oil than those listed please let me know.

 

Thank you all in advance,

Stoeger

 

 


Re: Oil help

carbure2003
 

Spindle oil is specified as SAE10 non detergent oil. This can be found at Canadian tire
 
for ways oil I am currently using chain saw bar oil that have similar texture as ways oil seen on youtube. I use summer grade
 

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "John Dammeyer" <johnd@...>
To: <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Oil help
Date: Mon, 23 Mar 2020 08:59:40 -0700

Where does one buy those in Canada?

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Fred Flintstone via Groups.Io
Sent: March-23-20 8:53 AM
To: southbendlathe@groups.io; SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Oil help

 

Thank you,

 

I will give it a shot.

 

 

 

On Monday, March 23, 2020, 4:41:25 PM GMT+2, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:

 

 

ISO 68 and ISO 32 are hydraulic oils that are commonly sold at tractor shops. I’ve purchase all 3 oils in low volume from amazon. 


<![if !supportLineBreakNewLine]>
<![endif]>

On Mar 23, 2020, at 05:00, Fred Flintstone via Groups.Io <stoeger666@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,

 

I hope you are staying well,

 

While I am at home and enjoying my lathe I am running low on oil, can some one tell me the European equivalent of the oils below?:

 

 

 

  South Bend Lathe "A" type oil, which is Mobile Velocite #10 spindle lubricant. This will be used in the headstock spindle
                        bearings.

  South Bend Lathe "B" type oil.  which is Mobil DTE 24 (ISO 32), which will be used in your gearbox.


  South Bend Lathe "C" type oil,  which is Mobil DTE Heavy/Medium (ISO 68), which will be used to lubricate "everything else".
                        (that would be screws, external gears, tailstock, etc.)

  South Bend Way Oil, which is Mobil Vactra #2 Way Oil, which will be used to lubricate the sliding Way surfaces of the lathe,
                        (The ways, compound and cross slide).

 

 

 

Or if there is now better oil than those listed please let me know.

 

Thank you all in advance,

Stoeger

 

 


Re: New to me 14.5" and need some help

Jim_B
 

2265 was shipped around 12/6/55

In the files section of the group, you will find South Bend “Forms" of the various assemblies. These include assembly drawings showing which parts go where and a list of the South Bend Part numbers. They are usually good for the Heavy 10 through the larger lathes but not the 11” lathe, which is sort of an orphan. 

You can use these when communicating with Ted. 

There is also a Excel work sheet which gives the ship dates to a limited degree of accuracy.  Its based only on Verified ship dates, either from the factory or Grizzly. Its called South Bend Chronology-XXX. (XXX is the revision.)


On Mar 23, 2020, at 1:18 PM, sblatheman via Groups.Io <latheman2@...> wrote:

2265

Jim B.





--
Jim B


Re: New to me 14.5" and need some help

sblatheman
 

I have SOME 14 1/2” parts. Email me a list of what you need.

Ted
Latheman2@...

On Mar 22, 2020, at 9:29 PM, Todd <belvedere66@...> wrote:

I just acquired a 14.5 x 60 and will be needing some help with parts.  See it was bought, disassembled, started to be cleaned/painted and then sat in boxes for a few years.  What I know it's missing is the compound dial, screw and nut. The motor and motor pulley (4 groove), some of the taper attachment, the oil well on the back of the apron.. !! and a few other niceties.  I'm sure I will find a few other misc items of need and I understand these are the rare birds of the S.B. world. Is there anywhere I can find a parts manual to assist in reassembly ?  Also, the serial number is 2265FKL12  if anyone can decipher the date.

  Thanks, Todd


Re: New to me 14.5" and need some help

Payson
 

Send pictures.

Payson.


Re: it's alive!!!! - first run of a SB13B I am working on

RJ White
 

Thanks for showing this, good to see these old machines running.


On Mar 22, 2020, at 6:42 PM, Des via Groups.Io <desbromilow@...> wrote:


 
https://youtu.be/sNumbAgICXI

still a lot of work to do, but it's actually turning now. A very big shout out to Steve Wells for the assist on the overhead countershaft speed figure.

Des in Oz (Australia)


Re: Oil help

John Dammeyer
 

Where does one buy those in Canada?

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Fred Flintstone via Groups.Io
Sent: March-23-20 8:53 AM
To: southbendlathe@groups.io; SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Oil help

 

Thank you,

 

I will give it a shot.

 

 

 

On Monday, March 23, 2020, 4:41:25 PM GMT+2, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:

 

 

ISO 68 and ISO 32 are hydraulic oils that are commonly sold at tractor shops. I’ve purchase all 3 oils in low volume from amazon. 



On Mar 23, 2020, at 05:00, Fred Flintstone via Groups.Io <stoeger666@...> wrote:



Hi all,

 

I hope you are staying well,

 

While I am at home and enjoying my lathe I am running low on oil, can some one tell me the European equivalent of the oils below?:

 

 

 

  South Bend Lathe "A" type oil, which is Mobile Velocite #10 spindle lubricant. This will be used in the headstock spindle
                        bearings.

  South Bend Lathe "B" type oil.  which is Mobil DTE 24 (ISO 32), which will be used in your gearbox.


  South Bend Lathe "C" type oil,  which is Mobil DTE Heavy/Medium (ISO 68), which will be used to lubricate "everything else".
                        (that would be screws, external gears, tailstock, etc.)

  South Bend Way Oil, which is Mobil Vactra #2 Way Oil, which will be used to lubricate the sliding Way surfaces of the lathe,
                        (The ways, compound and cross slide).

 

 

 

Or if there is now better oil than those listed please let me know.

 

Thank you all in advance,

Stoeger

 


Re: Oil help

Fred Flintstone
 

Thank you,

I will give it a shot.



On Monday, March 23, 2020, 4:41:25 PM GMT+2, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:


ISO 68 and ISO 32 are hydraulic oils that are commonly sold at tractor shops. I’ve purchase all 3 oils in low volume from amazon. 


On Mar 23, 2020, at 05:00, Fred Flintstone via Groups.Io <stoeger666@...> wrote:


Hi all,

I hope you are staying well,

While I am at home and enjoying my lathe I am running low on oil, can some one tell me the European equivalent of the oils below?:



  South Bend Lathe "A" type oil, which is Mobile Velocite #10 spindle lubricant. This will be used in the headstock spindle
                        bearings.

  South Bend Lathe "B" type oil.  which is Mobil DTE 24 (ISO 32), which will be used in your gearbox.


  South Bend Lathe "C" type oil,  which is Mobil DTE Heavy/Medium (ISO 68), which will be used to lubricate "everything else".
                        (that would be screws, external gears, tailstock, etc.)

  South Bend Way Oil, which is Mobil Vactra #2 Way Oil, which will be used to lubricate the sliding Way surfaces of the lathe,
                        (The ways, compound and cross slide).




Or if there is now better oil than those listed please let me know.

Thank you all in advance,
Stoeger


Re: Oil help

Colin Fera
 

ISO 68 and ISO 32 are hydraulic oils that are commonly sold at tractor shops. I’ve purchase all 3 oils in low volume from amazon. 


On Mar 23, 2020, at 05:00, Fred Flintstone via Groups.Io <stoeger666@...> wrote:


Hi all,

I hope you are staying well,

While I am at home and enjoying my lathe I am running low on oil, can some one tell me the European equivalent of the oils below?:



  South Bend Lathe "A" type oil, which is Mobile Velocite #10 spindle lubricant. This will be used in the headstock spindle
                        bearings.

  South Bend Lathe "B" type oil.  which is Mobil DTE 24 (ISO 32), which will be used in your gearbox.


  South Bend Lathe "C" type oil,  which is Mobil DTE Heavy/Medium (ISO 68), which will be used to lubricate "everything else".
                        (that would be screws, external gears, tailstock, etc.)

  South Bend Way Oil, which is Mobil Vactra #2 Way Oil, which will be used to lubricate the sliding Way surfaces of the lathe,
                        (The ways, compound and cross slide).




Or if there is now better oil than those listed please let me know.

Thank you all in advance,
Stoeger


Re: Oil help

Christian Nafzger
 

Hi Stoeger,

I recently bought oil for my "new" Model A 9" lathe from a German shop.
Here is the order list with the respective letters (A-D, D for the way oil).

image.png

You can also look at the shop page for more info regarding the norms and specifications. E.g.: https://www.oeltech-apeler.de/product_info.php?info=p1536_avantol-bett--und-gleitbahnoel-cglp-iso-vg-68---1-litres.html
Its in German, but maybe this helps (you can switch to English, but then there is less information).

Cheers,
Chris

Am Mo., 23. März 2020 um 13:00 Uhr schrieb Fred Flintstone via Groups.Io <stoeger666=yahoo.com@groups.io>:

Hi all,

I hope you are staying well,

While I am at home and enjoying my lathe I am running low on oil, can some one tell me the European equivalent of the oils below?:



  South Bend Lathe "A" type oil, which is Mobile Velocite #10 spindle lubricant. This will be used in the headstock spindle
                        bearings.

  South Bend Lathe "B" type oil.  which is Mobil DTE 24 (ISO 32), which will be used in your gearbox.


  South Bend Lathe "C" type oil,  which is Mobil DTE Heavy/Medium (ISO 68), which will be used to lubricate "everything else".
                        (that would be screws, external gears, tailstock, etc.)

  South Bend Way Oil, which is Mobil Vactra #2 Way Oil, which will be used to lubricate the sliding Way surfaces of the lathe,
                        (The ways, compound and cross slide).




Or if there is now better oil than those listed please let me know.

Thank you all in advance,
Stoeger


Oil help

Fred Flintstone
 

Hi all,

I hope you are staying well,

While I am at home and enjoying my lathe I am running low on oil, can some one tell me the European equivalent of the oils below?:



  South Bend Lathe "A" type oil, which is Mobile Velocite #10 spindle lubricant. This will be used in the headstock spindle
                        bearings.

  South Bend Lathe "B" type oil.  which is Mobil DTE 24 (ISO 32), which will be used in your gearbox.


  South Bend Lathe "C" type oil,  which is Mobil DTE Heavy/Medium (ISO 68), which will be used to lubricate "everything else".
                        (that would be screws, external gears, tailstock, etc.)

  South Bend Way Oil, which is Mobil Vactra #2 Way Oil, which will be used to lubricate the sliding Way surfaces of the lathe,
                        (The ways, compound and cross slide).




Or if there is now better oil than those listed please let me know.

Thank you all in advance,
Stoeger


Re: New to me 14.5" and need some help

Steven H
 

Two other resources:

Facebook: South Bend Lathe BUY SELL TRADE group

www.Groups.io SouthBendLathe 

Steve Haskell

On Mar 22, 2020, at 10:02 PM, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:

Another great info resource is 
www.wswells.com

Steve Haskell

On Mar 22, 2020, at 9:35 PM, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:



        go here & wright what parts yer lookin for & this guy will be able to help ya out

        Ted /Latheman he used to work for SouthBend & bought up a bunch of their parts

        https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/  

        animal   

On 3/22/2020 6:25 PM, Todd wrote:
I just acquired a 14.5 x 60 and will be needing some help with parts.  See it was bought, disassembled, started to be cleaned/painted and then sat in boxes for a few years.  What I know it's missing is the compound dial, screw and nut. The motor and motor pulley (4 groove), some of the taper attachment, the oil well on the back of the apron.. !! and a few other niceties.  I'm sure I will find a few other misc items of need and I understand these are the rare birds of the S.B. world. Is there anywhere I can find a parts manual to assist in reassembly ?  Also, the serial number is 2265FKL12  if anyone can decipher the date.

  Thanks, Todd


Re: New to me 14.5" and need some help

Steven H
 

Another great info resource is 
www.wswells.com

Steve Haskell

On Mar 22, 2020, at 9:35 PM, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:



        go here & wright what parts yer lookin for & this guy will be able to help ya out

        Ted /Latheman he used to work for SouthBend & bought up a bunch of their parts

        https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/  

        animal   

On 3/22/2020 6:25 PM, Todd wrote:
I just acquired a 14.5 x 60 and will be needing some help with parts.  See it was bought, disassembled, started to be cleaned/painted and then sat in boxes for a few years.  What I know it's missing is the compound dial, screw and nut. The motor and motor pulley (4 groove), some of the taper attachment, the oil well on the back of the apron.. !! and a few other niceties.  I'm sure I will find a few other misc items of need and I understand these are the rare birds of the S.B. world. Is there anywhere I can find a parts manual to assist in reassembly ?  Also, the serial number is 2265FKL12  if anyone can decipher the date.

  Thanks, Todd


Re: New to me 14.5" and need some help

Bill in OKC too
 

You might want to buy this book:

https://www.amazon.com/Guide-Renovating-South-Lathe-Models/dp/1482334585/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=south+bend+heavy+10+lathe+book&qid=1584928328&sr=8-1

I bought it for my Heavy 10L, and it also covers your 14-1/2" lathe. I got the set that has the felts as well, you might want to the version with felts for your lathe if you don't have them already.

the book is invaluable to me for disassembly. Since you didn't get to do that, it will be invaluable for assembly, as well, I expect! Doesn't look like Amazon has the felts you might need, but they're also sold on ebay with the same book.

HTH!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Sunday, March 22, 2020, 08:29:25 PM CDT, Todd <belvedere66@...> wrote:


I just acquired a 14.5 x 60 and will be needing some help with parts.  See it was bought, disassembled, started to be cleaned/painted and then sat in boxes for a few years.  What I know it's missing is the compound dial, screw and nut. The motor and motor pulley (4 groove), some of the taper attachment, the oil well on the back of the apron.. !! and a few other niceties.  I'm sure I will find a few other misc items of need and I understand these are the rare birds of the S.B. world. Is there anywhere I can find a parts manual to assist in reassembly ?  Also, the serial number is 2265FKL12  if anyone can decipher the date.

  Thanks, Todd


it's alive!!!! - first run of a SB13B I am working on

Des
 

 
https://youtu.be/sNumbAgICXI

still a lot of work to do, but it's actually turning now. A very big shout out to Steve Wells for the assist on the overhead countershaft speed figure.

Des in Oz (Australia)


Re: New to me 14.5" and need some help

mike allen
 

        go here & wright what parts yer lookin for & this guy will be able to help ya out

        Ted /Latheman he used to work for SouthBend & bought up a bunch of their parts

        https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/  

        animal   

On 3/22/2020 6:25 PM, Todd wrote:
I just acquired a 14.5 x 60 and will be needing some help with parts.  See it was bought, disassembled, started to be cleaned/painted and then sat in boxes for a few years.  What I know it's missing is the compound dial, screw and nut. The motor and motor pulley (4 groove), some of the taper attachment, the oil well on the back of the apron.. !! and a few other niceties.  I'm sure I will find a few other misc items of need and I understand these are the rare birds of the S.B. world. Is there anywhere I can find a parts manual to assist in reassembly ?  Also, the serial number is 2265FKL12  if anyone can decipher the date.

  Thanks, Todd


New to me 14.5" and need some help

Todd
 

I just acquired a 14.5 x 60 and will be needing some help with parts.  See it was bought, disassembled, started to be cleaned/painted and then sat in boxes for a few years.  What I know it's missing is the compound dial, screw and nut. The motor and motor pulley (4 groove), some of the taper attachment, the oil well on the back of the apron.. !! and a few other niceties.  I'm sure I will find a few other misc items of need and I understand these are the rare birds of the S.B. world. Is there anywhere I can find a parts manual to assist in reassembly ?  Also, the serial number is 2265FKL12  if anyone can decipher the date.

  Thanks, Todd


Re: D1-4 chuck setup

Colin Fera
 

Thanks for the advice and videos. This has been resolved. I pulled the cams out of the spindle, there were allot of burs on them. This lathe came with a collet closer where there was a sleeve to mount the actual collet allowing the cam holes to fill with chips and swarf. I suspect that the previous owner crushed the chips with the cams leading to significant burs on the cams. I de-burred the cams and got about a tablespoon of crushed up chips and dust out of the holes. Re assembled and torqued the chuck in with a torque wrench and now the chuck face is true within 3-4 tenths and the chuck body which doesn't even matter is true within a couple thou. I don't have the patience to try and measure the chuck jaws relative to the chuck face (I guess that would be perpendicularity?). I am pretty happy with tenths from the chuck face (and this was the first mount) for such a cheap setup. I paid about 50 cents per pound for this stuff, I have no illusions of being able to do work for NASA. 


On Sat, Mar 21, 2020 at 4:42 PM ww_big_al <arknack@...> wrote:

If you want, Adam Booth talks about the cam locks, checking and setting. It starts at 22 minutes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsPuJ4RizLs

Finishes in part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1ERnlgEUr4

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jon Holmes
Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2020 7:26 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] D1-4 chuck setup

 

Sounds like it might be staying on the taper only and not bottoming out on the flat registers ?

 

On 22 Mar 2020, at 10:16 AM, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:

 

3 pins only.  This is a D1-4 spindle. D1-5 and D1-6 are 6 pin spindles. This seems like the common camlock spindle for lathes in the 10-13 inch range including the heavy 10 when that has a camlock.  It definitely does lock up. Removing the chuck after its locked requires a tap with a mallet. 

 

I just spoke to my mechanical engineer friend and he is suggesting I take the cams out of the spindle and blow out and clean the camlock holes. Basically saying that chips and maybe Chinese grinding dust could get in there and take up some of the torque applied to the cams so that when you think you have them close to evenly applied torque your actually not very close and so your pulling unevenly on the chuck.

 

On Sat, Mar 21, 2020 at 3:00 PM eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:

Are you saying you only have 3 pins on the chuck or the sockets on the spindle?  I've only ever seen 6 sockets, but things like catchplates usually have only 3 pins.  Every chuck or faceplate I've seen has 6 pins.

 

If you only have 3 pins to go at, then snugging one and hard tightening its opposite isn't an option!  You have to snug all then tighten all to seat the cone correctly.

 

If one of the cams is showing resistance gradually increasing over a significant rotation, then investigate that area.  The D1-6 on our Colchester Triumph 2000 just goes suddenly solid.  If it doesn't, there's dirt in the way.  I suggest for a start you could check the taper hole in the chuck for blemishes.

 

To check the need for adjustment on taper rollers on a horizontal shaft, use your DTI on an end face and crowbar the spindle for & aft as close as possible to its centreline, but note that for a true reading, the shaft must be rotated slightly while under load in order to settle the rollers into their correct location.

 

Eddie

 

On Saturday, 21 March 2020, 21:37:01 GMT, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:

 

 

Thanks for the reply, I don't think anything is wrong with the spindle, less than 3 tenths of runout seems reasonable to me for a Chinese lathe. I am measuring with a good mitutoyo test indicator. This apparently has tapered roller bearings in the spindle and they could potentially use some adjustment. If thats the issue the weight of the chuck would probably tend to pull the spindle out a bit against the taper. The guy that loaded the lathe for me used a forklift to pick it up under the ways with a strap (there was no chuck mounted at the time). This is a really cheap 12x36 lathe (the fully enclosed gear box style) but it appears to have seen almost no use and all of the surfaces and even the paint is like new. 

 

One other thing that was a bit strange during this process perhaps was that one of the camlocks was a bit tighter than the others and began to engage before the first mark and settled between the marks about 1/3 of the way past the first mark where as the other 2 had no engagement at all until they just crossed the first mark and tightened up about 3/4 of the way to the second mark. 

 

 

On Sat, Mar 21, 2020 at 2:02 PM eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:

You are right, Camlock spindles are supposed to align better than that.  The only adjustment they should need is the protrusion of the pins (achieved by removing the locking screw and screwing the pin itself in or out) so that the line on each locking cam head lies between the 2 lines scribed at right angles to each other on the spindle flange.  You must then fit the chuck or whatever only in the same orientation thereafter, achieved by a line on the flange and a line on the chuck.  Both should already have the line.  You should not transfer chucks between spindles without checking for the correct locking angle of the cam.

 

Tighten the cams No. 1 snug, no. 4 tight, No. 1 tight, then 2, 3, 5 & 6 all tight.

 

The taper the chuck seats onto should look after the rest.  Is that or the chuck taper damaged?  It seats on the taper, not the flat.

 

Doesn't sound like your lathe has been craned via a sling around the chuck  (gets done by non specialist removers, can bend the spindle), but check carefully.  Problem most likely lies in your chuck, I suspect.

 

Eddie

 

On Saturday, 21 March 2020, 20:28:46 GMT, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:

 

 

I just recently picked up a too cheap to pass up cheap lathe on craigslist with a D1-4 camlock spindle. I cleaned and lightly stoned the spindle surfaces which look nearly new and checked for runout with a tenths indicator and I am getting about .00025" runout on the spindle face and a bit less on the taper. A cheap fuerda 4 jaw 8" chuck came with the lathe It has the D1-4 mount integral. After cleaning and stoning the flat surfaces on the chuck I installed the chuck and check for runout and had about .005". I rotated to each of the 3 positions and had about the same runout with each. I used a couple of different techniques with the camlocks, first I just snugged and then tightened them in no particular order, attempt 2 was to tighten them clockwise and then finally counter clockwise order, this made no difference and I was always getting at least .0045" runout

 

 Finally I tried something different, I very lightly tightened the camlocks after remounting the chuck and used the tenths indicator on the face and basically tightened the camlocks like aligning work in a 4 jaw using the camlocks to pull the face into alignment tightening a little at a time and was able to get the chuck face to within .0003-.0004" by the time the camlocks were fully tight. As this is a 4 jaw independent jaw chuck I am figuring that the most important factor is having the face of the chuck perpendicular to spindle rather than checking with a test bar. The point of this whole post finally. 

 

I thought that camlock spindles where supposed to repeat better than this. Is this alignment and installation process normal?  

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: D1-4 chuck setup

ww_big_al
 

If you want, Adam Booth talks about the cam locks, checking and setting. It starts at 22 minutes.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsPuJ4RizLs

Finishes in part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1ERnlgEUr4

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jon Holmes
Sent: Saturday, March 21, 2020 7:26 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] D1-4 chuck setup

 

Sounds like it might be staying on the taper only and not bottoming out on the flat registers ?

 

On 22 Mar 2020, at 10:16 AM, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:

 

3 pins only.  This is a D1-4 spindle. D1-5 and D1-6 are 6 pin spindles. This seems like the common camlock spindle for lathes in the 10-13 inch range including the heavy 10 when that has a camlock.  It definitely does lock up. Removing the chuck after its locked requires a tap with a mallet. 

 

I just spoke to my mechanical engineer friend and he is suggesting I take the cams out of the spindle and blow out and clean the camlock holes. Basically saying that chips and maybe Chinese grinding dust could get in there and take up some of the torque applied to the cams so that when you think you have them close to evenly applied torque your actually not very close and so your pulling unevenly on the chuck.

 

On Sat, Mar 21, 2020 at 3:00 PM eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:

Are you saying you only have 3 pins on the chuck or the sockets on the spindle?  I've only ever seen 6 sockets, but things like catchplates usually have only 3 pins.  Every chuck or faceplate I've seen has 6 pins.

 

If you only have 3 pins to go at, then snugging one and hard tightening its opposite isn't an option!  You have to snug all then tighten all to seat the cone correctly.

 

If one of the cams is showing resistance gradually increasing over a significant rotation, then investigate that area.  The D1-6 on our Colchester Triumph 2000 just goes suddenly solid.  If it doesn't, there's dirt in the way.  I suggest for a start you could check the taper hole in the chuck for blemishes.

 

To check the need for adjustment on taper rollers on a horizontal shaft, use your DTI on an end face and crowbar the spindle for & aft as close as possible to its centreline, but note that for a true reading, the shaft must be rotated slightly while under load in order to settle the rollers into their correct location.

 

Eddie

 

On Saturday, 21 March 2020, 21:37:01 GMT, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:

 

 

Thanks for the reply, I don't think anything is wrong with the spindle, less than 3 tenths of runout seems reasonable to me for a Chinese lathe. I am measuring with a good mitutoyo test indicator. This apparently has tapered roller bearings in the spindle and they could potentially use some adjustment. If thats the issue the weight of the chuck would probably tend to pull the spindle out a bit against the taper. The guy that loaded the lathe for me used a forklift to pick it up under the ways with a strap (there was no chuck mounted at the time). This is a really cheap 12x36 lathe (the fully enclosed gear box style) but it appears to have seen almost no use and all of the surfaces and even the paint is like new. 

 

One other thing that was a bit strange during this process perhaps was that one of the camlocks was a bit tighter than the others and began to engage before the first mark and settled between the marks about 1/3 of the way past the first mark where as the other 2 had no engagement at all until they just crossed the first mark and tightened up about 3/4 of the way to the second mark. 

 

 

On Sat, Mar 21, 2020 at 2:02 PM eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:

You are right, Camlock spindles are supposed to align better than that.  The only adjustment they should need is the protrusion of the pins (achieved by removing the locking screw and screwing the pin itself in or out) so that the line on each locking cam head lies between the 2 lines scribed at right angles to each other on the spindle flange.  You must then fit the chuck or whatever only in the same orientation thereafter, achieved by a line on the flange and a line on the chuck.  Both should already have the line.  You should not transfer chucks between spindles without checking for the correct locking angle of the cam.

 

Tighten the cams No. 1 snug, no. 4 tight, No. 1 tight, then 2, 3, 5 & 6 all tight.

 

The taper the chuck seats onto should look after the rest.  Is that or the chuck taper damaged?  It seats on the taper, not the flat.

 

Doesn't sound like your lathe has been craned via a sling around the chuck  (gets done by non specialist removers, can bend the spindle), but check carefully.  Problem most likely lies in your chuck, I suspect.

 

Eddie

 

On Saturday, 21 March 2020, 20:28:46 GMT, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:

 

 

I just recently picked up a too cheap to pass up cheap lathe on craigslist with a D1-4 camlock spindle. I cleaned and lightly stoned the spindle surfaces which look nearly new and checked for runout with a tenths indicator and I am getting about .00025" runout on the spindle face and a bit less on the taper. A cheap fuerda 4 jaw 8" chuck came with the lathe It has the D1-4 mount integral. After cleaning and stoning the flat surfaces on the chuck I installed the chuck and check for runout and had about .005". I rotated to each of the 3 positions and had about the same runout with each. I used a couple of different techniques with the camlocks, first I just snugged and then tightened them in no particular order, attempt 2 was to tighten them clockwise and then finally counter clockwise order, this made no difference and I was always getting at least .0045" runout

 

 Finally I tried something different, I very lightly tightened the camlocks after remounting the chuck and used the tenths indicator on the face and basically tightened the camlocks like aligning work in a 4 jaw using the camlocks to pull the face into alignment tightening a little at a time and was able to get the chuck face to within .0003-.0004" by the time the camlocks were fully tight. As this is a 4 jaw independent jaw chuck I am figuring that the most important factor is having the face of the chuck perpendicular to spindle rather than checking with a test bar. The point of this whole post finally. 

 

I thought that camlock spindles where supposed to repeat better than this. Is this alignment and installation process normal?  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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