Date   

Re: 14 1/2" tailstock taper

Dave Eggebraaten (AF5IA)
 

Get one capable of 5/8".  You won't be sorry.

On 2/17/2020 5:30 AM, Jeremy Summers wrote:
So now I'm shopping for an economical drill chuck.   Does anyone have a suggestion for a MT3 chuck up to 1/2"?

Anyone had experience with this Vertex keyless  chuck or can I find a better value elsewhere?  It has pretty good reviews.

I'm just using this for some hobby work and don't need to invest a ton of money, but I don't want junk.


Re: 14 1/2" tailstock taper

Harry Ruble
 

I have a vertex keyless chuck but with a r8 taper, I think I have the 1/8 to 5/8 version. It's a great chuck. I suppose it might not be albrecht worthy but it is fine for my needs. I also have a vertex boring head and really like that as well. Vertex tools are pretty good for import stuff from what I have seen.

Harry


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Jeremy Summers <jeremy@...>
Sent: Monday, February 17, 2020 5:30 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 14 1/2" tailstock taper
 
So now I'm shopping for an economical drill chuck.   Does anyone have a suggestion for a MT3 chuck up to 1/2"?

Anyone had experience with this Vertex keyless  chuck or can I find a better value elsewhere?  It has pretty good reviews.

I'm just using this for some hobby work and don't need to invest a ton of money, but I don't want junk.


Re: 14 1/2" tailstock taper

Jeremy Summers
 

So now I'm shopping for an economical drill chuck.   Does anyone have a suggestion for a MT3 chuck up to 1/2"?

Anyone had experience with this Vertex keyless  chuck or can I find a better value elsewhere?  It has pretty good reviews.

I'm just using this for some hobby work and don't need to invest a ton of money, but I don't want junk.


Re: Pearl Harbor WWII SB 10 L markings

Sam
 

I hope you have a succession plan in place for all your info.

On Sat, Feb 15, 2020 at 8:21 AM Steve Wells <wswells@...> wrote:
Glenn,
Copy of old post on the subject:

In the serial number file, which I am always several years behind on, I only
list the information I am provided with. The posts with my personal opinions
are also kind of old when we were first chatting about the stamps. My
opinions are subject to change…lol, and I have flipped flopped somewhat on
this subject in regards to the JAN stamp, which would/could appear to be a
military spec stamp. Inspectors at the military arms or provision suppliers,
used their initials. The inspectors could be military or military employed
civilian, not important, the point is they are inspection and acceptance
stamps. See info below.

It is well known that SBL was a major machine supplier with the Navy.

Listed Inspection stamps found on SBL machines:

AROTUL USA,  DPC 10
DWW, JFP
D.W.W, W.E.F
D.W.W. , F.W.M
D.W.W & J.F.P.  U.S.N. Property
D.W.W. , J.F.P. USA-HEW,  Defense Plant Corporation tags for Boeing Corp
D.W.W.,  US, navy stamp (ANCHOR)
D.W.W., D.R.M, US, navy stamp (ANCHOR)
FWM
JAN
JAN, JOD
JBL
J.B.R
JFP
JFP, DWW
JFP, LOR & Flaming Bomb
LQR
LOR, JAN
LOR, JOD
L.O.R., J.F.N., US, navy stamp (ANCHOR)
LOR, JFP
WEF
WBL,  DETRO DPC T 505
US 47,  J.A.N
Property of USAF 875747

Web search Info found on Inspector stamps:

For Sale: Oficial U.S. Navy inspector's hammer with dies at each end. The
large die is 1 3/16" W x 1 6/16" H. The small die is 9/16" W x 9/16" H. The
mark stamped on an item indicated it has passed inspection.

It is reported by companies that made these items during WW II, that the
inspectors kept these tools under lock and key, and that they never had
access to them. At the end of the War, when the inspectors left the plants,
this tool went with them

JAN = joint Army-Navy [specification]

Inspection and acceptance marks:
The US Navy 'Anchor' stamp indicated the item had been inspected and
accepted by the US Navy.
The U.S. Navy's inspector's mark -- the initials "U S" with a small anchor
between

Small arms of the United States Army and Navy bear an initial or initials
which are called inspector’s marks. These marks appear on stocks, grips or
metal parts. Some arms, especially older ones, have more than one inspector’s
initial or initials.

The Army and Navy purchased arms from commercial outlets and also contracted
directly with the manufacturers. The Navy also purchased some arms from the
Army. From the early days of 1831, most small arms contract inspectors were
civilians or Springfield Armory employees. Officers who served as inspectors
were from the Army Ordnance Department or the Navy Bureau of Ordnance. There
were also sub-inspectors who had regular jobs at Springfield Armory, and
small arms inspection was in addition to their regular duties. Army or Navy
inspectors had control over all sub-inspectors.

It must be noted that in some cases, these inspectors are civilian
personnel. Others will be military personnel

Initials    Name, Title                         Period

SPS       Sidney P. Spaulding, Lt. Col., USA- 1940
RS        Robert Sears, Col., USA- 1940-45
MS        Maurice Sherman, Armory S-l-   1940
LAS       Laurence A. Stone, Lt., USA- 1940
GHS     Gilbert H. Stewart, Col., USA- 1938-40
CES      Clarence E. Simpson, Armory S-l- 1939
ECP      Edward C. Perry, Armor) S-l- 1937-40
WCO      Warren C. Odell, Armory S-l-    1939
RSJ       Robert S. Johnson, Armory S-l-   1940
SLG      Sidney L. Gibson, Lt., USA-  1941
SGG      Samuel G. Green, Lt. Col., USA- 1939
JKC       John K. Christmas, Lt. Col., USA- 1942
JJC       John J. Callahan, Armory S-l- 1940
AC        Alexander Cameron, Armory S-l-940
WAB      William A. Borden, Lt. Col., USA 1936-39
WB       Waldemar Broberg, Col., USA-  1941
JAB       John A. Brooks, Jr.., Lt. Col., USA- 1940
FJA       Frank 1. Atwood, Lt. Col., USA- 1943-45



Steve Wells
The SBL Workshop
www.wswells.com


-----Original Message-----
From: mike allen
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2020 12:20 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Pearl Harbor WWII SB 10 L markings

        ya might ask the same question here , Steve Well's or Ted
Latheman could probably tell ya the scoop

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/

         animal

On 2/12/2020 12:10 AM, glenn brooks wrote:
> Hello All,
>
> The Hawaii Railway Society, in Ewa Beach,  has an old surplus WWII Pearl
> Harbor SB 10L in our back shops.  I would like to come up with some
> explanation of the WW II stampings on the end side of the bed/ways.
>
> Can anyone advise what these markings may indicate?
>
> FYI, we know the lathe was produced in 1942, and came from the Navy to the
> HRS from the Pearl Harbor naval machine shop some years ago. But I haven’t
> been able to interpret the markings that have been added since new, or
> find anyone who knows what they mean.
>
> Clearly the lathe contributed to the war effort in the Pacific. I think it
> would be cool to learn more about where it has been used.
>
> Thanks much if anyone can shed any light on its history.
>
> Thanks much,
> Glenn
>
>
>








Re: Pearl Harbor WWII SB 10 L markings

glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
 

Steve,

This is incredible information. Thanks very much for sending it along! Our lathe does indeed display the W.E.F and L.Q.R. Inspector stamps, near the Navy anchor mark.so we know the inspectors initials, at least.

Now the final marking is still interesting: “ MA E127”

Wondering if this stamping appears on other SB lathes?

Here at Pearl Harbor, all equipment usually ends up with a separate facilities inventory ID number either stamped or riveted to the equipment - sort of like the unit identification numbers painted on the bumpers of army trucks.

However, none of the PH facility tags match the MA E127 number sequence. So maybe it’s a ship number or some other unit designator??

Steve, again, many thanks for the work you accomplish, tracking the history of these old lathes.

Regards
Glenn

On Feb 15, 2020, at 3:21 AM, Steve Wells <wswells@earthlink.net> wrote:

Glenn,
Copy of old post on the subject:

In the serial number file, which I am always several years behind on, I only list the information I am provided with. The posts with my personal opinions are also kind of old when we were first chatting about the stamps. My opinions are subject to change…lol, and I have flipped flopped somewhat on this subject in regards to the JAN stamp, which would/could appear to be a military spec stamp. Inspectors at the military arms or provision suppliers, used their initials. The inspectors could be military or military employed civilian, not important, the point is they are inspection and acceptance stamps. See info below.

It is well known that SBL was a major machine supplier with the Navy.

Listed Inspection stamps found on SBL machines:

AROTUL USA, DPC 10
DWW, JFP
D.W.W, W.E.F
D.W.W. , F.W.M
D.W.W & J.F.P. U.S.N. Property
D.W.W. , J.F.P. USA-HEW, Defense Plant Corporation tags for Boeing Corp
D.W.W., US, navy stamp (ANCHOR)
D.W.W., D.R.M, US, navy stamp (ANCHOR)
FWM
JAN
JAN, JOD
JBL
J.B.R
JFP
JFP, DWW
JFP, LOR & Flaming Bomb
LQR
LOR, JAN
LOR, JOD
L.O.R., J.F.N., US, navy stamp (ANCHOR)
LOR, JFP
WEF
WBL, DETRO DPC T 505
US 47, J.A.N
Property of USAF 875747

Web search Info found on Inspector stamps:

For Sale: Oficial U.S. Navy inspector's hammer with dies at each end. The large die is 1 3/16" W x 1 6/16" H. The small die is 9/16" W x 9/16" H. The mark stamped on an item indicated it has passed inspection.

It is reported by companies that made these items during WW II, that the inspectors kept these tools under lock and key, and that they never had access to them. At the end of the War, when the inspectors left the plants, this tool went with them

JAN = joint Army-Navy [specification]

Inspection and acceptance marks:
The US Navy 'Anchor' stamp indicated the item had been inspected and accepted by the US Navy.
The U.S. Navy's inspector's mark -- the initials "U S" with a small anchor between

Small arms of the United States Army and Navy bear an initial or initials which are called inspector’s marks. These marks appear on stocks, grips or metal parts. Some arms, especially older ones, have more than one inspector’s initial or initials.

The Army and Navy purchased arms from commercial outlets and also contracted directly with the manufacturers. The Navy also purchased some arms from the Army. From the early days of 1831, most small arms contract inspectors were civilians or Springfield Armory employees. Officers who served as inspectors were from the Army Ordnance Department or the Navy Bureau of Ordnance. There were also sub-inspectors who had regular jobs at Springfield Armory, and small arms inspection was in addition to their regular duties. Army or Navy inspectors had control over all sub-inspectors.

It must be noted that in some cases, these inspectors are civilian personnel. Others will be military personnel

Initials Name, Title Period

SPS Sidney P. Spaulding, Lt. Col., USA- 1940
RS Robert Sears, Col., USA- 1940-45
MS Maurice Sherman, Armory S-l- 1940
LAS Laurence A. Stone, Lt., USA- 1940
GHS Gilbert H. Stewart, Col., USA- 1938-40
CES Clarence E. Simpson, Armory S-l- 1939
ECP Edward C. Perry, Armor) S-l- 1937-40
WCO Warren C. Odell, Armory S-l- 1939
RSJ Robert S. Johnson, Armory S-l- 1940
SLG Sidney L. Gibson, Lt., USA- 1941
SGG Samuel G. Green, Lt. Col., USA- 1939
JKC John K. Christmas, Lt. Col., USA- 1942
JJC John J. Callahan, Armory S-l- 1940
AC Alexander Cameron, Armory S-l-940
WAB William A. Borden, Lt. Col., USA 1936-39
WB Waldemar Broberg, Col., USA- 1941
JAB John A. Brooks, Jr.., Lt. Col., USA- 1940
FJA Frank 1. Atwood, Lt. Col., USA- 1943-45



Steve Wells
The SBL Workshop
www.wswells.com


-----Original Message----- From: mike allen
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2020 12:20 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Pearl Harbor WWII SB 10 L markings

ya might ask the same question here , Steve Well's or Ted
Latheman could probably tell ya the scoop

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/

animal

On 2/12/2020 12:10 AM, glenn brooks wrote:
Hello All,

The Hawaii Railway Society, in Ewa Beach, has an old surplus WWII Pearl Harbor SB 10L in our back shops. I would like to come up with some explanation of the WW II stampings on the end side of the bed/ways.

Can anyone advise what these markings may indicate?

FYI, we know the lathe was produced in 1942, and came from the Navy to the HRS from the Pearl Harbor naval machine shop some years ago. But I haven’t been able to interpret the markings that have been added since new, or find anyone who knows what they mean.

Clearly the lathe contributed to the war effort in the Pacific. I think it would be cool to learn more about where it has been used.

Thanks much if anyone can shed any light on its history.

Thanks much,
Glenn







Re: Pearl Harbor WWII SB 10 L markings

Steve Wells
 

Glenn,
Copy of old post on the subject:

In the serial number file, which I am always several years behind on, I only list the information I am provided with. The posts with my personal opinions are also kind of old when we were first chatting about the stamps. My opinions are subject to change…lol, and I have flipped flopped somewhat on this subject in regards to the JAN stamp, which would/could appear to be a military spec stamp. Inspectors at the military arms or provision suppliers, used their initials. The inspectors could be military or military employed civilian, not important, the point is they are inspection and acceptance stamps. See info below.

It is well known that SBL was a major machine supplier with the Navy.

Listed Inspection stamps found on SBL machines:

AROTUL USA, DPC 10
DWW, JFP
D.W.W, W.E.F
D.W.W. , F.W.M
D.W.W & J.F.P. U.S.N. Property
D.W.W. , J.F.P. USA-HEW, Defense Plant Corporation tags for Boeing Corp
D.W.W., US, navy stamp (ANCHOR)
D.W.W., D.R.M, US, navy stamp (ANCHOR)
FWM
JAN
JAN, JOD
JBL
J.B.R
JFP
JFP, DWW
JFP, LOR & Flaming Bomb
LQR
LOR, JAN
LOR, JOD
L.O.R., J.F.N., US, navy stamp (ANCHOR)
LOR, JFP
WEF
WBL, DETRO DPC T 505
US 47, J.A.N
Property of USAF 875747

Web search Info found on Inspector stamps:

For Sale: Oficial U.S. Navy inspector's hammer with dies at each end. The large die is 1 3/16" W x 1 6/16" H. The small die is 9/16" W x 9/16" H. The mark stamped on an item indicated it has passed inspection.

It is reported by companies that made these items during WW II, that the inspectors kept these tools under lock and key, and that they never had access to them. At the end of the War, when the inspectors left the plants, this tool went with them

JAN = joint Army-Navy [specification]

Inspection and acceptance marks:
The US Navy 'Anchor' stamp indicated the item had been inspected and accepted by the US Navy.
The U.S. Navy's inspector's mark -- the initials "U S" with a small anchor between

Small arms of the United States Army and Navy bear an initial or initials which are called inspector’s marks. These marks appear on stocks, grips or metal parts. Some arms, especially older ones, have more than one inspector’s initial or initials.

The Army and Navy purchased arms from commercial outlets and also contracted directly with the manufacturers. The Navy also purchased some arms from the Army. From the early days of 1831, most small arms contract inspectors were civilians or Springfield Armory employees. Officers who served as inspectors were from the Army Ordnance Department or the Navy Bureau of Ordnance. There were also sub-inspectors who had regular jobs at Springfield Armory, and small arms inspection was in addition to their regular duties. Army or Navy inspectors had control over all sub-inspectors.

It must be noted that in some cases, these inspectors are civilian personnel. Others will be military personnel

Initials Name, Title Period

SPS Sidney P. Spaulding, Lt. Col., USA- 1940
RS Robert Sears, Col., USA- 1940-45
MS Maurice Sherman, Armory S-l- 1940
LAS Laurence A. Stone, Lt., USA- 1940
GHS Gilbert H. Stewart, Col., USA- 1938-40
CES Clarence E. Simpson, Armory S-l- 1939
ECP Edward C. Perry, Armor) S-l- 1937-40
WCO Warren C. Odell, Armory S-l- 1939
RSJ Robert S. Johnson, Armory S-l- 1940
SLG Sidney L. Gibson, Lt., USA- 1941
SGG Samuel G. Green, Lt. Col., USA- 1939
JKC John K. Christmas, Lt. Col., USA- 1942
JJC John J. Callahan, Armory S-l- 1940
AC Alexander Cameron, Armory S-l-940
WAB William A. Borden, Lt. Col., USA 1936-39
WB Waldemar Broberg, Col., USA- 1941
JAB John A. Brooks, Jr.., Lt. Col., USA- 1940
FJA Frank 1. Atwood, Lt. Col., USA- 1943-45



Steve Wells
The SBL Workshop
www.wswells.com

-----Original Message-----
From: mike allen
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2020 12:20 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Pearl Harbor WWII SB 10 L markings

ya might ask the same question here , Steve Well's or Ted
Latheman could probably tell ya the scoop

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/

animal

On 2/12/2020 12:10 AM, glenn brooks wrote:
Hello All,

The Hawaii Railway Society, in Ewa Beach, has an old surplus WWII Pearl Harbor SB 10L in our back shops. I would like to come up with some explanation of the WW II stampings on the end side of the bed/ways.

Can anyone advise what these markings may indicate?

FYI, we know the lathe was produced in 1942, and came from the Navy to the HRS from the Pearl Harbor naval machine shop some years ago. But I haven’t been able to interpret the markings that have been added since new, or find anyone who knows what they mean.

Clearly the lathe contributed to the war effort in the Pacific. I think it would be cool to learn more about where it has been used.

Thanks much if anyone can shed any light on its history.

Thanks much,
Glenn



Another 14 1/2 question-- spindle

John M
 

My 14 1/2" uses the cast or iron bearing with the 2 1/4x6 tpi and wanted to find out if anyone knows are all the spindle shafts on the 14 1/2 interchangeable. Mine has some wobble and found a replacement but it came out of a 14 1/2 that orig has the bronz bearing. Ideally I would like to change it out to the larger 2 3/8 or d1 but I think that requires an entire change over.


Re: 14 1/2" tailstock taper

Jeremy Summers
 

Thanks everyone for the info.  Now off to purchase a chuck after which I'm sure to find the one I thought I already had.
Jeremy


Re: 14 1/2" tailstock taper

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

The spindle taper is .602 t.p.f. (taper per foot) which is
the same t.p.f. as Morse Taper #3 but the diameter is
different.  The diameter depends on which 14.5" model
you have. 

If yours has the 2-1/4 x 6 tpi, threaded spindle,  The major
inside diameter should be 1.325".  If yours have 2-3/8 x 6 tpi,
then the major diameter should be 1.629"

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: 14 1/2" tailstock taper

Dave Eggebraaten (AF5IA)
 

I have a 14 1/2 lathe and the tail stock is a MT3.  The spindle is larger (about a MT 4ish).  It wasn't a standard MT.  Mine has a L00 spindle mount. Use an MT3/Jacobs size for whatever drill chuck you like.

On 2/12/2020 12:06 PM, Jeremy Summers wrote:
I have a 14 1/2" x 6 lathe that I had listed here for sale a time back.  I decided to go ahead and finish getting it wired up and put it to use and I need a drill chuck for it.  I could have sworn it came with a Jacob's chuck but I can't find it so perhaps I never received it.  I know the spindle uses a custom taper, but what taper does the tailstock use?  Is it MT2 or does it match the spindle?


Re: 14 1/2" tailstock taper

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Golden Valley Light Railway's 14.5" x 6' toolroom SB WW2 era has a MT3 tailstock.

Eddie

On Wednesday, 12 February 2020, 19:09:30 GMT, George Meinschein <bustedguns@...> wrote:


MT3.  Should be a match with your spindle.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com
On 2/12/2020 1:06 PM, Jeremy Summers wrote:
I have a 14 1/2" x 6 lathe that I had listed here for sale a time back.  I decided to go ahead and finish getting it wired up and put it to use and I need a drill chuck for it.  I could have sworn it came with a Jacob's chuck but I can't find it so perhaps I never received it.  I know the spindle uses a custom taper, but what taper does the tailstock use?  Is it MT2 or does it match the spindle?


Re: 14 1/2" tailstock taper

George Meinschein
 

MT3.  Should be a match with your spindle.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com
On 2/12/2020 1:06 PM, Jeremy Summers wrote:

I have a 14 1/2" x 6 lathe that I had listed here for sale a time back.  I decided to go ahead and finish getting it wired up and put it to use and I need a drill chuck for it.  I could have sworn it came with a Jacob's chuck but I can't find it so perhaps I never received it.  I know the spindle uses a custom taper, but what taper does the tailstock use?  Is it MT2 or does it match the spindle?


14 1/2" tailstock taper

Jeremy Summers
 

I have a 14 1/2" x 6 lathe that I had listed here for sale a time back.  I decided to go ahead and finish getting it wired up and put it to use and I need a drill chuck for it.  I could have sworn it came with a Jacob's chuck but I can't find it so perhaps I never received it.  I know the spindle uses a custom taper, but what taper does the tailstock use?  Is it MT2 or does it match the spindle?


Re: Pearl Harbor WWII SB 10 L markings

mike allen
 

ya might ask the same question here , Steve Well's or Ted Latheman could probably tell ya the scoop

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/

        animal

On 2/12/2020 12:10 AM, glenn brooks wrote:
Hello All,

The Hawaii Railway Society, in Ewa Beach, has an old surplus WWII Pearl Harbor SB 10L in our back shops. I would like to come up with some explanation of the WW II stampings on the end side of the bed/ways.

Can anyone advise what these markings may indicate?

FYI, we know the lathe was produced in 1942, and came from the Navy to the HRS from the Pearl Harbor naval machine shop some years ago. But I haven’t been able to interpret the markings that have been added since new, or find anyone who knows what they mean.

Clearly the lathe contributed to the war effort in the Pacific. I think it would be cool to learn more about where it has been used.

Thanks much if anyone can shed any light on its history.

Thanks much,
Glenn


Pearl Harbor WWII SB 10 L markings

glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
 

Hello All,

The Hawaii Railway Society, in Ewa Beach, has an old surplus WWII Pearl Harbor SB 10L in our back shops. I would like to come up with some explanation of the WW II stampings on the end side of the bed/ways.

Can anyone advise what these markings may indicate?

FYI, we know the lathe was produced in 1942, and came from the Navy to the HRS from the Pearl Harbor naval machine shop some years ago. But I haven’t been able to interpret the markings that have been added since new, or find anyone who knows what they mean.

Clearly the lathe contributed to the war effort in the Pacific. I think it would be cool to learn more about where it has been used.

Thanks much if anyone can shed any light on its history.

Thanks much,
Glenn


Re: Found on Dallas Craigslist - 27" SBL

john kling
 

Are lathes like this one that are modified with huge riser blocks subject to a lot of twisting?

On Saturday, February 8, 2020, 7:27:45 PM EST, sblatheman via Groups.Io <latheman2@...> wrote:


Steve,
The 14” Turn ado was an import like what grizzly sells, a “South Bend” in name only.
Note: not to be confused with the Fourteen (made in South Bend)
Ted

> On Feb 8, 2020, at 5:50 PM, Steve Wells <wswells@...> wrote:
>
> Ted, did you ever see one of the 14's built?
>
> Steve
>
> -----Original Message----- From: sblatheman via Groups.Io
> Sent: Saturday, February 8, 2020 5:30 PM
> To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Found on Dallas Craigslist - 27" SBL
>
> It is a 27” (17” with risers) built for the military in South Bend, Indiana.
> Most of them were built for off-road mobile machine shops.
>
> Ted
>
>> On Feb 8, 2020, at 3:07 PM, bclong7@... wrote:
>>
>> Claims it is NOS.  Not involved - just passing this along....
>>
>> https://dallas.craigslist.org/ndf/tls/d/sadler-new-southbend-27-engine-lathe/7052505638.html
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>




Re: Found on Dallas Craigslist - 27" SBL

Steve Wells
 

Is it a 612 ?
Steve

On Feb 8, 2020, at 7:43 PM, ken campbell <deltainc@grm.net> wrote:

Magnaturn ... i have one that was working when i shut it off in 2006. has 6 ft. air barfeed. sw iowa ... pm me if interested.





Re: Found on Dallas Craigslist - 27" SBL

ken campbell
 

Magnaturn ... i have one that was working when i shut it off in 2006.  has 6 ft. air barfeed.  sw iowa ... pm me if interested.


Re: Found on Dallas Craigslist - 27" SBL

sblatheman
 

Steve,
The 14” Turn ado was an import like what grizzly sells, a “South Bend” in name only.
Note: not to be confused with the Fourteen (made in South Bend)
Ted

On Feb 8, 2020, at 5:50 PM, Steve Wells <wswells@earthlink.net> wrote:

Ted, did you ever see one of the 14's built?

Steve

-----Original Message----- From: sblatheman via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, February 8, 2020 5:30 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Found on Dallas Craigslist - 27" SBL

It is a 27” (17” with risers) built for the military in South Bend, Indiana.
Most of them were built for off-road mobile machine shops.

Ted

On Feb 8, 2020, at 3:07 PM, bclong7@runbox.com wrote:

Claims it is NOS. Not involved - just passing this along....

https://dallas.craigslist.org/ndf/tls/d/sadler-new-southbend-27-engine-lathe/7052505638.html











Re: Found on Dallas Craigslist - 27" SBL

Bill in OKC too
 

Well, I was apparently wrong. They no longer list a 27" lathe, though they do have lathes up to 41". 



They have several lathes that are not branded South Bend but nothing in that size. 


Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Saturday, February 8, 2020, 02:48:32 PM CST, bclong7@... <bclong7@...> wrote:


The plaques riveted to it mention "South Bend Lathe Company South Bend, Indiana" and "An Employee Owned Company".  The patina and design - to me it just looks like a lathe that would have been made in South Bend.  And the serial number appears to follow the same pattern as other later production SB machines.  However, there is no mention of a machine bigger than 17 inch in Steve Wells' database. 

I'm certainly no expert on the subject - this is all just enjoyable speculation. 

Bernie

On 2/8/2020 2:19 PM, James Rice wrote:
It's been listed for months now.  Same price which is about the retail price quoted by South Bend/Grizzly.  It's only 15 minutes from me, I should call them and check it out.  


James

On Sat, Feb 8, 2020 at 2:05 PM <bclong7@...> wrote:
Claims it is NOS.  Not involved - just passing this along....

https://dallas.craigslist.org/ndf/tls/d/sadler-new-southbend-27-engine-lathe/7052505638.html







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