Date   

Re: Headstock shims...

oscar kern <kernbigo@...>
 


That was the exact. Point I was stating


Re: Headstock shims...

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

There seems to be some misunderstanding about keeping the shim
packs even.  My reference is to bearings that use two shim packs on
each bearing.  Lathes like the Heavy Ten and larger use two packs per
bearing and some older 9 inch models did too.  Shimming of bearings
between front and rear bearings have no relation to each other other
than the clearance specification.  Later 9 inch and 10K models use only
one shim pack per bearing and hence there is no point to keeping bearing
ship packs even.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: South Bend for Sale

Payson
 

wow


Re: Tumbler Mod

Roger Bickers
 

That reversing lever set up is one more reason I like the old wide bed Series O 9" lathes. It's just like the one (in design) used on the heavy 10. Roger


On Tue, Jan 21, 2020 at 9:15 PM, mike allen
<animal@...> wrote:


Tumbler Mod

mike allen
 

saw this today & moved it way up towards the top of my list

https://www.homemadetools.net/forum/sb-lathe-reverse-tumbler-mod-65181?utm_source=newsletter&;utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=01-15-20&fi=103503#post103503

        animal


South Bend for Sale

Keith Douglass
 

If I didn’t live 4 hours away, this would already be in my truck :-D

-Keith


Re: Headstock shims...

oscar kern <kernbigo@...>
 


If you have  more wear on one bearing than, the other you can not shim them the same.I used to scrape spindle  bearing  in on large grinders and it would be nice to use the same shim but realistic.  Also I use a torque  wrench so I can controll the lift better, one may have 30# the other could have40#


Re: Headstock shims...

Steven H
 

Might be blasphemy, but aluminum cooking foil is about .001” thick.
Steve Haskell


On Tuesday, January 21, 2020, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

Hi There,

1) do you try to keep both the right and left shims at the same thickness?
2) How tight are the bolts supposed to be?
3) should the shims be the right thickness so you can torque down the bolts, and the spindle still spins freely?
4) any good tutorials on how to properly adjust the headshock shims, or is it basically trial and error?

I'll try to answer your questions.  Shim packs should be kept as
even in thickness as possible.

I've never seen a torque spec. for the headstock bearing bolts but
I go with 25 to 35 lbs.-ft.

When bearing clearances are set correctly, the spindle should rotate
freely or at least, can be turned by hand.  Correct bearing clearance
depends on the type of bearings in the headstock.  Lathes with cast
iron bearings should have .0010" to .0015" clearance when the spindle
is lifted with 75lbs. of force and pushed down with the same force.

Bronze bearings are set a little tighter at .0007" to .0010" clearance
using the same lift and push force as above.  This should be measured
as close to the bearing as possible (like on the register area when
checking the front bearing). 

Originally, the shim packs included a loose single .001" shim to remove
(or add) when removing one of the laminated .002" shims is too much. 
Laminated shims were soldered together using a very soft solder. 
A sharp knife can be used to peel off one shim layer.  Always measure
the thickness of the removed shim to make sure you removed only one
layer.  I keep some .001" and .002" shim stock on hand to make a
replacement shim as needed.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Headstock shims...

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

1) do you try to keep both the right and left shims at the same thickness?
2) How tight are the bolts supposed to be?
3) should the shims be the right thickness so you can torque down the bolts, and the spindle still spins freely?
4) any good tutorials on how to properly adjust the headshock shims, or is it basically trial and error?

I'll try to answer your questions.  Shim packs should be kept as
even in thickness as possible.

I've never seen a torque spec. for the headstock bearing bolts but
I go with 25 to 35 lbs.-ft.

When bearing clearances are set correctly, the spindle should rotate
freely or at least, can be turned by hand.  Correct bearing clearance
depends on the type of bearings in the headstock.  Lathes with cast
iron bearings should have .0010" to .0015" clearance when the spindle
is lifted with 75lbs. of force and pushed down with the same force.

Bronze bearings are set a little tighter at .0007" to .0010" clearance
using the same lift and push force as above.  This should be measured
as close to the bearing as possible (like on the register area when
checking the front bearing). 

Originally, the shim packs included a loose single .001" shim to remove
(or add) when removing one of the laminated .002" shims is too much. 
Laminated shims were soldered together using a very soft solder. 
A sharp knife can be used to peel off one shim layer.  Always measure
the thickness of the removed shim to make sure you removed only one
layer.  I keep some .001" and .002" shim stock on hand to make a
replacement shim as needed.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Headstock shims...

Thomas Harrold
 

Thank you, hose pictures are a good start.  I'd still like to hear from others who have done shim adjustments on SB9 lathes.

Thanks,

-Tom


Re: Headstock shims...

Steven H
 

In the files section there is a TechInfo folder and in that folder is another folder entitled Bearing Adjustment. that info should help. Good luck.


Steve Haskell
Troy, MI

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Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com

On Tuesday, January 21, 2020, Thomas Harrold via Groups.Io <thomas.harrold@...> wrote:

Hi, I noticed some odd behavior from my SBL 9" (circa 1957).  I could visibly see stock in the chuck moving when the lathe was running.
When I put an indicator on the chuck, and even on the end of the stock (a dowel pin, or drill rod), I would see virtually NO movement.

So I lifted UP on the stock, and...I could actually see movement of the entire chuck and spindle. 

I restored this lathe 3-4 years ago, and was just learning about SBL (and older lathes in general), so when I re-assembled the headstock, I put the original shims back in, tightened down the headstock, and forgot about them. 

I pulled the shims.  Found what appears to be a solid aluminum shim, and the brass "shim pack", which is layers of .002" shim stock somehow glued together.

I remove a layer, and re-assembled.  Better, but not perfect.  Before I continue down this path, I thought I'd ask about best practices when tweaking the headstock bearing spacing.

1) do you try to keep both the right and left shims at the same thickness?
2) How tight are the bolts supposed to be?
3) should the shims be the right thickness so you can torque down the bolts, and the spindle still spins freely?
4) any good tutorials on how to properly adjust the headshock shims, or is it basically trial and error?

Thanks in advance,

-Tom


Headstock shims...

Thomas Harrold
 

Hi, I noticed some odd behavior from my SBL 9" (circa 1957).  I could visibly see stock in the chuck moving when the lathe was running.
When I put an indicator on the chuck, and even on the end of the stock (a dowel pin, or drill rod), I would see virtually NO movement.

So I lifted UP on the stock, and...I could actually see movement of the entire chuck and spindle. 

I restored this lathe 3-4 years ago, and was just learning about SBL (and older lathes in general), so when I re-assembled the headstock, I put the original shims back in, tightened down the headstock, and forgot about them. 

I pulled the shims.  Found what appears to be a solid aluminum shim, and the brass "shim pack", which is layers of .002" shim stock somehow glued together.

I remove a layer, and re-assembled.  Better, but not perfect.  Before I continue down this path, I thought I'd ask about best practices when tweaking the headstock bearing spacing.

1) do you try to keep both the right and left shims at the same thickness?
2) How tight are the bolts supposed to be?
3) should the shims be the right thickness so you can torque down the bolts, and the spindle still spins freely?
4) any good tutorials on how to properly adjust the headshock shims, or is it basically trial and error?

Thanks in advance,

-Tom


Re: Mica Undercutting Accessory.

Nitro
 

It had to do with the material that the brushes were made out of.
Higher load starting motors had higher copper content as opposed to the higher carbon contact of a generator brush that got accelerated wear from the mica.

I have the factory motorized mica undercutter for my Atlas 618, but at this stage of my game, it is purely a relic ;)


Re: Mica Undercutting Accessory.

bob
 

The bulletin printed by SB mentioned that starters don't get undercut but not why. Thanks for the additional info.


Re: Mica Undercutting Accessory.

bob
 

Thank you for the Bulletin. Printed, read and saved. Very helpful.


Re: Mica Undercutting Accessory.

Nick Jonkman
 

Hi, If memory serves me right you only undercut generator armatures not starer armatures, only those with carbon brushes not with copper brushes as starters have. Over the last 60 years I probably have done hundreds of them, not too many in the last 20 years since retiring from full time mechanicing.

I only work on some classic cars now for others and of course my own Studebaker and my modern vehicles

Nick


On 20-01-16 8:29 PM, bob wrote:
Didn't know what this was at first. Found it in the '58 South Bend Catalog. Fitted it onto my 9,10K and heavy 10. Now I have to take apart an old motor to try it. It came with the brass jaw Jacobs chuck too.


Mica Undercutting Accessory.

Jim_B
 

Here is how SB said to use it.



Sent from my iPhone-8
Jim B,

--
Jim B


Mica Undercutting Accessory.

bob
 

Didn't know what this was at first. Found it in the '58 South Bend Catalog. Fitted it onto my 9,10K and heavy 10. Now I have to take apart an old motor to try it. It came with the brass jaw Jacobs chuck too.


Re: My latest project

Roy Wall
 

Nice work as always Jim!!!


Re: My latest project

Payson
 

 Would a round, thread-in sight gage, as in a Nardini, be useful? 

Payson

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