Date   

Re: Ordering Parts for a Southbend Lathe

glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
 

Joel, another good resource is to join the South Bend lathe group on Groups.io. Used to be on Yahoo groups- but Yahoo is now kaput and the company is deleting all groups info inDecember.   There are also SB pages on home shop machinist and a more general lathe page on Chaski.org.  

When you look for actual parts, versus tooling, you will need to know the SB catalog number for your lathe.  The catalog Number is key to identifying which  part run SB used to build your lathe.  Every year or two SB changed their catalog listing and published a new sales catalog, showing their current inventory. Each lathe corresponds to a specific catalog.  Hopefully you will still have a builders plate on your machine- this plate contains the catalog number.

There is a guy on the SB groups.io who has compiled a list of all known SB lathes, by serial number.  He can ID your catalog number, via serial number, if you can’t find it otherwise.

Glenn 


On Oct 25, 2019, at 6:02 AM, Joel Turner <jturner421@...> wrote:

Good morning,

I just recently purchased a Model 9A bench lathe that had very little tooling and needs some repair.  I ordered my serial number card and learned that the machine was produce in December of 1946.  Now that I have the card, how do I use the information to look up parts on the Grizzly site?  For example, on the card, the apron is listed as A101.  Does this correspond to a parts listing?  If so, where can I obtain one?

Thanks in advance for replies,

Joel


Re: Ordering Parts for a Southbend Lathe

glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
 

Joel, grizzly doesn't carry any parts for the older SB lathes. However, you can order lots of stuff for older SB lathes from Latheman Ted. He is a wonderful resource and free with info and advice if something ever breaks on your lathe.

Here’s his contact info: latheman2@...

For tooling, EBay is your friend - lots of SB stuff there.


Glenn 


On Oct 25, 2019, at 6:02 AM, Joel Turner <jturner421@...> wrote:

Good morning,

I just recently purchased a Model 9A bench lathe that had very little tooling and needs some repair.  I ordered my serial number card and learned that the machine was produce in December of 1946.  Now that I have the card, how do I use the information to look up parts on the Grizzly site?  For example, on the card, the apron is listed as A101.  Does this correspond to a parts listing?  If so, where can I obtain one?

Thanks in advance for replies,

Joel


Re: Acquiring Tooling for a Lathe

Steven H
 

Suggestion: You can look up the dimensions for Morse tapers online (Google) or in Machinery’s Handbook. The sizes are not that close together. Easy to tell the difference between MT1-2-3. The large end dimension is what you need. Make yourself a cheat-sheet card and carry it in your pocket when shopping at sales. 

As far as a 4-chuck, yes carry a 6 inch steel rule with you. Measure across the opening and estimate the depth of the thread to get the thread major diameter. Your SB lathe probably has 1.5”-8tpi threaded spindle nose? If so, 8 threads per inch is 1/8” between the crests, also pretty easy to estimate with a “trained eye” or a steel rule. Good luck.

Steve Haskell

On Oct 25, 2019, at 11:50 AM, Joel Turner <jturner421@...> wrote:

Jim,

I’m not clear on "How to Run a Lathe” answers my questions. I get that the book will identify the types of tooling for my lathe and how to use them.  For example, I’m just not sure how I go about evaluating how to identify that a live center is an MT2 or MT3?  Is just as simple as putting a caliper to it and measuring it or can I expect that tools will have markings on them.  Same with a 4-jaw chuck.  Measure the TPI and the inner diameter to see if it fits?

Thanks,

—Joel



On Oct 25, 2019, at 10:08 AM, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:

Start by reading “How to Run a Lathe”. Copies are available in the files section of this group. 

Many of your questions will be answered there. 

-8
Jim B,

On Oct 25, 2019, at 10:27 AM, Joel Turner <jturner421@...> wrote:

Let me start by saying that I am absolutely new to metalworking but I have been doing a quite a bit of reading lately on the subject. I have enough reference material on how to run a lathe but little information on identifying what used tooling will fit or can be adapted to my lathe   

With that background I recently purchased a 1946 SB 9A lathe catalog# 744 that had no tooling other than a 3 jaw chuck, a Jacobs chuck, a collection of HSS cutters, and one tool holder. I'd like to begin purchasing some tooling and I'm wondering how you identify the proper size of tools that you might find at a live auction.  Do chucks, live and dead centers typically have markings on them that indicate thread count or taper size? Are tool holders for lantern style universal or are they machine specific? Can steady and follow rests from another manufacturer fit on a SouthBend and if so, how do you determine that?

Appreciate any advice or references to websites that have this type of information.

Thanks,

Joel  

--
Jim B


Re: Patent for 'Face Plate Locking Means'

Ondrej Krejci
 

Somebody at South Bend Lathe was bored and decided to take out a roller ratchet patent for keeping threaded attachments on spindles in case of sudden braking or reversing not for cutting with the spindles running in reverse, that requires positive locking.

OK

On Friday, October 25, 2019, 11:09:55 AM EDT, john kling via Groups.Io <jkling222@...> wrote:


I have an old (now unused) Goodell Pratt lathe that holds the threaded adjustment ring in position on the spindle with a set screw that does not go all the way through the end/adjustment ring. I note that this lathe like many of the South Bends has no babbit, brons, ball or taper spindle bearings just the cast iron in the head stock.

On Friday, October 25, 2019, 10:56:18 AM EDT, Scott Highton <scott@...> wrote:


Just curious on your perspectives here…  what’s the difference between this patent and the more simple installation of a set screw (or a double set screw) to hold the plate / chuck onto the spindle?


Scott


Re: Acquiring Tooling for a Lathe

Joel Turner
 

Jim,

I’m not clear on "How to Run a Lathe” answers my questions. I get that the book will identify the types of tooling for my lathe and how to use them.  For example, I’m just not sure how I go about evaluating how to identify that a live center is an MT2 or MT3?  Is just as simple as putting a caliper to it and measuring it or can I expect that tools will have markings on them.  Same with a 4-jaw chuck.  Measure the TPI and the inner diameter to see if it fits?

Thanks,

—Joel



On Oct 25, 2019, at 10:08 AM, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:

Start by reading “How to Run a Lathe”. Copies are available in the files section of this group. 

Many of your questions will be answered there. 

-8
Jim B,

On Oct 25, 2019, at 10:27 AM, Joel Turner <jturner421@...> wrote:

Let me start by saying that I am absolutely new to metalworking but I have been doing a quite a bit of reading lately on the subject. I have enough reference material on how to run a lathe but little information on identifying what used tooling will fit or can be adapted to my lathe   

With that background I recently purchased a 1946 SB 9A lathe catalog# 744 that had no tooling other than a 3 jaw chuck, a Jacobs chuck, a collection of HSS cutters, and one tool holder. I'd like to begin purchasing some tooling and I'm wondering how you identify the proper size of tools that you might find at a live auction.  Do chucks, live and dead centers typically have markings on them that indicate thread count or taper size? Are tool holders for lantern style universal or are they machine specific? Can steady and follow rests from another manufacturer fit on a SouthBend and if so, how do you determine that?

Appreciate any advice or references to websites that have this type of information.

Thanks,

Joel  

--
Jim B


Re: Patent for 'Face Plate Locking Means'

john kling
 

I have an old (now unused) Goodell Pratt lathe that holds the threaded adjustment ring in position on the spindle with a set screw that does not go all the way through the end/adjustment ring. I note that this lathe like many of the South Bends has no babbit, brons, ball or taper spindle bearings just the cast iron in the head stock.

On Friday, October 25, 2019, 10:56:18 AM EDT, Scott Highton <scott@...> wrote:


Just curious on your perspectives here…  what’s the difference between this patent and the more simple installation of a set screw (or a double set screw) to hold the plate / chuck onto the spindle?


Scott


Re: Acquiring Tooling for a Lathe

Jim_B
 

Start by reading “How to Run a Lathe”. Copies are available in the files section of this group. 

Many of your questions will be answered there. 

-8
Jim B,

On Oct 25, 2019, at 10:27 AM, Joel Turner <jturner421@...> wrote:

Let me start by saying that I am absolutely new to metalworking but I have been doing a quite a bit of reading lately on the subject. I have enough reference material on how to run a lathe but little information on identifying what used tooling will fit or can be adapted to my lathe   

With that background I recently purchased a 1946 SB 9A lathe catalog# 744 that had no tooling other than a 3 jaw chuck, a Jacobs chuck, a collection of HSS cutters, and one tool holder. I'd like to begin purchasing some tooling and I'm wondering how you identify the proper size of tools that you might find at a live auction.  Do chucks, live and dead centers typically have markings on them that indicate thread count or taper size? Are tool holders for lantern style universal or are they machine specific? Can steady and follow rests from another manufacturer fit on a SouthBend and if so, how do you determine that?

Appreciate any advice or references to websites that have this type of information.

Thanks,

Joel  

--
Jim B


Re: Patent for 'Face Plate Locking Means'

Scott Highton
 

Just curious on your perspectives here… what’s the difference between this patent and the more simple installation of a set screw (or a double set screw) to hold the plate / chuck onto the spindle?


Scott


Ordering Parts for a Southbend Lathe

Joel Turner
 

Good morning,

I just recently purchased a Model 9A bench lathe that had very little tooling and needs some repair.  I ordered my serial number card and learned that the machine was produce in December of 1946.  Now that I have the card, how do I use the information to look up parts on the Grizzly site?  For example, on the card, the apron is listed as A101.  Does this correspond to a parts listing?  If so, where can I obtain one?

Thanks in advance for replies,

Joel


Acquiring Tooling for a Lathe

Joel Turner
 

Let me start by saying that I am absolutely new to metalworking but I have been doing a quite a bit of reading lately on the subject. I have enough reference material on how to run a lathe but little information on identifying what used tooling will fit or can be adapted to my lathe   

With that background I recently purchased a 1946 SB 9A lathe catalog# 744 that had no tooling other than a 3 jaw chuck, a Jacobs chuck, a collection of HSS cutters, and one tool holder. I'd like to begin purchasing some tooling and I'm wondering how you identify the proper size of tools that you might find at a live auction.  Do chucks, live and dead centers typically have markings on them that indicate thread count or taper size? Are tool holders for lantern style universal or are they machine specific? Can steady and follow rests from another manufacturer fit on a SouthBend and if so, how do you determine that?

Appreciate any advice or references to websites that have this type of information.

Thanks,

Joel  


Re: iGaging for 9" South Bend

carbure2003
 

KEep in mind that on the saddle axis id is extremely useful, easy to fit and almost invisible


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "comstock_friend" <jfriend314@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] iGaging for 9" South Bend
Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2019 08:14:20 -0700

Thanks Guy for the reality check, I can do better than 2 thou with what I have...

John



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Re: iGaging for 9" South Bend

comstock_friend
 

Thanks Guy for the reality check, I can do better than 2 thou with what I have...

John


Re: Patent for 'Face Plate Locking Means'

Davis Johnson
 

Looks like it works on the same principle as some click-less ratchets or overrunning clutches. The difference is the key to hold the roller to keep where it won't bind when removing the faceplate.

On 10/24/19 1:32 PM, Steven H via Groups.Io wrote:
Attached is a 1964 South Bend Patent for a means to lock a faceplate to the lathe threaded spindle nose to prevent faceplate (or presumably a chuck) from unthreading when in reverse.

I don't know if South Bend ever put this in production. I have a 1963 South Bend 16" lathe and none of my faceplates or chucks have this feature. Probably because my lathe is a year or more earlier than the May 12, 1964 patent date.

I found this patent on the wswells.com SBL Workshop site. From the wswells.com home page, click on 'Projects', then SBL Patents and the pdf file can be found about half way down the list.

I may get the ambition to experiment on a 'prototype' faceplate someday and try to make this work.

Seems like some brass or plastic tipped set screws around the circumference of the faceplate or chuck hub might get the job done also and be a lot simpler. 

Robert Downs, what feature does your chuck have to prevent coming off in reverse? Photos?


Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 


Patent for 'Face Plate Locking Means'

Steven H
 

Attached is a 1964 South Bend Patent for a means to lock a faceplate to the lathe threaded spindle nose to prevent faceplate (or presumably a chuck) from unthreading when in reverse.

I don't know if South Bend ever put this in production. I have a 1963 South Bend 16" lathe and none of my faceplates or chucks have this feature. Probably because my lathe is a year or more earlier than the May 12, 1964 patent date.

I found this patent on the wswells.com SBL Workshop site. From the wswells.com home page, click on 'Projects', then SBL Patents and the pdf file can be found about half way down the list.

I may get the ambition to experiment on a 'prototype' faceplate someday and try to make this work.

Seems like some brass or plastic tipped set screws around the circumference of the faceplate or chuck hub might get the job done also and be a lot simpler. 

Robert Downs, what feature does your chuck have to prevent coming off in reverse? Photos?


Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 


Re: SB 2-1/4-8 spindle nose dimensions

Steven H
 

Thanks! I was poking around in the files section but didn’t come across it.

Steve Haskell

On Oct 23, 2019, at 7:15 PM, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


This should help. This is also in the Files section. 

Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Oct 23, 2019, at 6:50 PM, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:

For the South Bend lathe 2-1/4-8 threaded spindle nose what is the length from the face of the register where the chuck or faceplate seats to the RH end of the spindle? How long is the register diameter? What is the register diameter? Thanks.


--
Jim B
<tooling dimensions sb_7324.pdf>


Re: SB 2-1/4-8 spindle nose dimensions

Jim_B
 

This should help. This is also in the Files section. 

Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Oct 23, 2019, at 6:50 PM, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:

For the South Bend lathe 2-1/4-8 threaded spindle nose what is the length from the face of the register where the chuck or faceplate seats to the RH end of the spindle? How long is the register diameter? What is the register diameter? Thanks.


--
Jim B


SB 2-1/4-8 spindle nose dimensions

Steven H
 

For the South Bend lathe 2-1/4-8 threaded spindle nose what is the length from the face of the register where the chuck or faceplate seats to the RH end of the spindle? How long is the register diameter? What is the register diameter? Thanks.


Re: iGaging for 9" South Bend

carbure2003
 

THe real accuracy of igaging scales is plus or minus one thou. It means in practice plus or minus 2 thou diameter.
 
When dealing with large dials, mine are graduated to be direct reading, meaning one thou corresponds to one thou diameter, I can dial half a division, therefore 0.0005” dia.
 
Backlash is not too much of an issue. when taking a cut, motion is always in the same direction. Backlash is present on every machine  If you want good accuracy on the xslide, re scrape dovetail sliding surfaces. THis will ensure smooth motion. Xslide will move as per variations of feed as per dial.  Gibs too tight will cause errors as when you turn the dial, it just compresses the feed screw until force exerted is greater than friction force. Result is that you get  inconsistent diameter on the part being machined.
 
Guy
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "comstock_friend" <jfriend314@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] iGaging for 9" South Bend
Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2019 10:17:17 -0700

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 02:14 PM, carbure2003 wrote:

I found it not accurate enough and I was still relying on dials.

Guy, could you explain about the inaccuracies? I have the large dial but even between that and back lash, I think I would be ahead of the game with the DRO...

John



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Re: iGaging for 9" South Bend

comstock_friend
 

Mike (animal),

I could put a standoff to protect the scale. Plenty of clearance when tool post is in any usable position. On the tailstock side, I frequently need to butt it right up against the saddle, plus need to occasionally use the follow rest.

John


Re: iGaging for 9" South Bend

comstock_friend
 

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 02:14 PM, carbure2003 wrote:
I found it not accurate enough and I was still relying on dials.
Guy, could you explain about the inaccuracies? I have the large dial but even between that and back lash, I think I would be ahead of the game with the DRO...

John

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