Date   
Re: Precision level needed or not?

carbure2003
 

Be careful with this method, you don’t know if your tailstock is aligned, or if it is worn enough to be slightly off axial alignment. In addition, you would have to consider wear on the bed.

Levelling with precision level is my preferred option. Other unknown thing is bed top of v way condition.If there are dints, it may impact levelling.
I rebuilt a few south bend lathes. In the bed restauration process, the first thing I usually do is the re conditioning of 3 levelling positions: under the headstock first, then tailstock end at the bolt location, and the third one is under the chuck area. Usually, bedways are not damaged under the headstock and have minimum wear at the tailstock end. The zone near the headstock receives many dints, chucks being dropped, stock hitting bedways, etc... I spend time with a fine honing stone in order to ensure I have identical readings at the 3 locations. Accurate levelling is done with a jig that I manufactured as a template for slide ways scraping. Instead of using top bed ways surfaces, it uses the v profile of bed ways as reference. I level the lathe bed with a master precision level, then I hone my flat surfaces at the reference levelling positions until I get identical readings on the level. When the lathe is back together, the reference under the chuck is used at the same time as the tailstock reference point.

Chienese manufacture master precision levels sold for less than $100. 0.0002" / 10”. They will do the job. In between times I need the level, they go out of calibration very easy. I always have to recalibrate mine. My Starrett bought later on Kijiji keeps its calibration quite good. I have seen level vials for sale on ebay for less than $40. One was mounted in an aluminium holder. This would enable you to manufacture your own master precision level.
Remember that a lathe does not need to be perfectly levelled, you need to have the twist taken off. A lathe in a ship is never levelled. It is set properly when ship is in dry dock.

Guy Cadrin

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Steven H via Groups.Io" <stevesmachining=aol.com@groups.io>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Precision level needed or not?
Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 23:08:55 -0400

What you are describing - an alignment bar placed between centers - is one way of checking and setting the tailstock alignment both horizontally and vertically. These alignment bars are commercially available - Edge Technology makes one that is 12” long. Don’t know if such an item could be used to check for lathe bed twist, but if the idea would work, the bar should be max length the lathe can hold between centers.

Steve Haskell


On Jun 13, 2019, at 9:32 PM, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

I like the plumb bob idea, but have a question.e bed

I have never done this but would it work to put a mandrel known to be the same diameter at both ends on centers and then indicate the surface at the two ends with an indicator on the carriage set at one end and then the other?

At the very least it might be quicker than taking cuts and adjusting twist until the ends are the same?

Steve Bartlett




____________________________________________________________
Oncologists Are Freaking Out Over True Cause of Cancer
healthresponses.org
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5d031bfaa94aa1bfa7c35st02vuc

Re: Precision level needed or not?

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Not between centres, but holding your test bar in the chuck or headstock taper.  If you do it between centres, even if the tailstock is set dead centre to the headstock, it will follow the twist in the bed so give a zero change of DTI deflection at all longitudinal positions.

If it wobbles when rotated or is otherwise off centre in the chuck, no matter, just average the max & min readings.

I actually prefer the DTI method, as no matter how small a cut you put on, it will deflect the bar more the further you go from the headstock.  Use as long a bar as possible and cut a diameter near its centre as well.  No need to pay lots of ££ or $$.  Any old offcut or scrap will suffice.  Just spend time getting the 3 diameters right, which would probably be done easiest betwen centres, but then change to the chuck to use it.  Diameter should be proportionate to length for stiffness.  Thick wall tube is quite acceptable.

On the subject of the giant pendulum, I admire the initiative.  The longer the better of course, but what it must absolutely have is rigidity of the point of attachment at the top, no wobble.  Make it long enough and you can use it for measuring the earth's rotation!  (See Foucault's pendulum.)

For users of boning rods (parallels placed across the bed) you need good eysight and a large depth of field, so bright illumination plus room to view from the end, which we don't all have.  I feel they might be more use eliminating or averaging out twist on a flat bed rather than a V bed, as the sides of the Vs rather than tops are the bits that wear.  However, as a comparative test on a V bed, they could be used as a measure of wear of the Vs.  Any further thougts on that?

Eddie

On Friday, 14 June 2019, 02:32:29 BST, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op@...> wrote:


I like the plumb bob idea, but have a question.

I have never done this but would it work to put a mandrel known to be
the same diameter at both ends on centers and then indicate the surface
at the two ends with an indicator on the carriage set at one end and
then the other?

At the very least it might be quicker than taking cuts and adjusting
twist until the ends are the same?

Steve Bartlett



Re: Precision level needed or not?

glenn brooks
 

Also, FWIW, I usually re-level my lathes twice a year. Sometimes more often, due to hydrolic movement of our soils under the foundation, due to water saturation. Parts of my shop and house move up and down irregularly with the winter rains and summer drying conditions. Like Guy, I bought a precision level for a hundred bucks and have found it to be quite useful.

Glenn Brooks

On Jun 13, 2019, at 8:59 PM, carbure2003 <guycad@...> wrote:

Be careful with this method, you don’t know if your tailstock is aligned, or if it is worn enough to be slightly off axial alignment. In addition, you would have to consider wear on the bed.

Levelling with precision level is my preferred option. Other unknown thing is bed top of v way condition.If there are dints, it may impact levelling.
I rebuilt a few south bend lathes. In the bed restauration process, the first thing I usually do is the re conditioning of 3 levelling positions: under the headstock first, then tailstock end at the bolt location, and the third one is under the chuck area. Usually, bedways are not damaged under the headstock and have minimum wear at the tailstock end. The zone near the headstock receives many dints, chucks being dropped, stock hitting bedways, etc... I spend time with a fine honing stone in order to ensure I have identical readings at the 3 locations. Accurate levelling is done with a jig that I manufactured as a template for slide ways scraping. Instead of using top bed ways surfaces, it uses the v profile of bed ways as reference. I level the lathe bed with a master precision level, then I hone my flat surfaces at the reference levelling positions until I get identical readings on the level. When the lathe is back together, the reference under the chuck is used at the same time as the tailstock reference point.

Chienese manufacture master precision levels sold for less than $100. 0.0002" / 10”. They will do the job. In between times I need the level, they go out of calibration very easy. I always have to recalibrate mine. My Starrett bought later on Kijiji keeps its calibration quite good. I have seen level vials for sale on ebay for less than $40. One was mounted in an aluminium holder. This would enable you to manufacture your own master precision level.
Remember that a lathe does not need to be perfectly levelled, you need to have the twist taken off. A lathe in a ship is never levelled. It is set properly when ship is in dry dock.

Guy Cadrin

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Steven H via Groups.Io" <stevesmachining=aol.com@groups.io>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Precision level needed or not?
Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 23:08:55 -0400

What you are describing - an alignment bar placed between centers - is one way of checking and setting the tailstock alignment both horizontally and vertically. These alignment bars are commercially available - Edge Technology makes one that is 12” long. Don’t know if such an item could be used to check for lathe bed twist, but if the idea would work, the bar should be max length the lathe can hold between centers.

Steve Haskell


On Jun 13, 2019, at 9:32 PM, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

I like the plumb bob idea, but have a question.e bed

I have never done this but would it work to put a mandrel known to be the same diameter at both ends on centers and then indicate the surface at the two ends with an indicator on the carriage set at one end and then the other?

At the very least it might be quicker than taking cuts and adjusting twist until the ends are the same?

Steve Bartlett




____________________________________________________________
Oncologists Are Freaking Out Over True Cause of Cancer
healthresponses.org
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5d031bfaa94aa1bfa7c35st02vuc


Re: Precision level needed or not?

Rogan Creswick
 

Guy, Thanks for the details!

Could you share some pictures / diagrams of the jig you described for scraping? I need to do some inspection (and probably repair) work on a light 10k bed, and I imagine I'll need to make some tooling to help with that.

Thanks!
--Rogan

On Thu, Jun 13, 2019 at 9:01 PM carbure2003 <guycad@...> wrote:
Be careful with this method, you don’t know if your tailstock is aligned, or if it is worn enough to be slightly off axial alignment. In addition, you would have to consider wear on the bed.

Levelling with precision level is my preferred option. Other unknown thing is bed top of v way condition.If there are dints, it may impact levelling.
I rebuilt a few south bend lathes.  In the bed restauration process, the first thing I usually do is the re conditioning of 3 levelling positions: under the headstock first, then tailstock end at the bolt location, and the third one is under the chuck area. Usually, bedways are not damaged under the headstock and have minimum wear at the tailstock end. The zone near the headstock receives many dints, chucks being dropped, stock hitting bedways, etc...  I spend time with a fine honing stone in order to ensure I have identical readings at the 3 locations. Accurate levelling is done with a jig that I manufactured as a template for slide ways scraping. Instead of using top bed ways surfaces, it uses the v profile of bed ways as reference. I level the lathe bed with a master precision level, then I hone my flat surfaces at the reference levelling positions until I get identical readings on the level. When the lathe is back together, the reference under the chuck is used at the same time as the tailstock reference point.

Chienese manufacture master precision levels sold for less than $100. 0.0002" / 10”.  They will  do the job. In between times I need the level, they go out of calibration very easy. I always have to recalibrate mine. My Starrett bought later on Kijiji keeps its calibration quite good.  I have seen level vials for sale on ebay for less than $40. One was mounted in an aluminium holder.  This would enable you to manufacture your own master precision level.
Remember that a lathe does not need to be perfectly levelled, you need to have the twist taken off. A  lathe in a ship is never levelled. It is set properly when ship is in dry dock.

Guy Cadrin

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Steven H via Groups.Io" <stevesmachining=aol.com@groups.io>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Precision level needed or not?
Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 23:08:55 -0400

What you are describing - an alignment bar placed between centers - is one way of checking and setting the tailstock alignment both horizontally and vertically. These alignment bars are commercially available - Edge Technology makes one that is 12” long. Don’t know if such an item could be used to check for lathe bed twist, but if the idea would work, the bar should be max length the lathe can hold between centers.

Steve Haskell


> On Jun 13, 2019, at 9:32 PM, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
>
> I like the plumb bob idea, but have a question.e bed
>
> I have never done this but would it work to put a mandrel known to be the same diameter at both ends on centers and then indicate the surface at the two ends with an indicator on the carriage set at one end and then the other?
>
> At the very least it might be quicker than taking cuts and adjusting twist until the ends are the same?
>
> Steve Bartlett
>
>
>



____________________________________________________________
Oncologists Are Freaking Out Over True Cause of Cancer
healthresponses.org
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5d031bfaa94aa1bfa7c35st02vuc



Re: Precision level needed or not?

Stephen Bartlett
 

Is it possible to discern whether a measurement difference between ends of an alignment bar is due to tailstock misalignment or bed twist?

I guess the first thing is to get the tailstock alignment correct with the tailstock right at at the headstock.

When I got my lathe back about 1968 it had very little bed wear and I have not put too many miles on it.

In practice I have never paid much attention to twist because I do not generally work with long stock. Years ago I borrowed a precision level from work and leveled the bed. I moved in 1985 and since the bed had an adjustable tail end base I just loosened the set screws to let it settle out and then snugged them again, tightening each a little at a time, back and forth. It is on a heavy steel cabinet.

I looked at the Edge Technology web site. Much of their product line is affordable for a hobby situation.

Steve Bartlett


From: Steven H
Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 23:09:02 EDT

What you are describing - an alignment bar placed between centers - is one way of checking and setting the tailstock alignment both horizontally and vertically. These alignment bars are commercially available - Edge Technology makes one that is 12??? long. Don???t know if such an item could be used to check for lathe bed twist, but if the idea would work, the bar should be max length the lathe can hold between centers.

Steve Haskell

Re: Precision level needed or not?

Steven H
 

Another fellow earlier today said no, an alignment bar between centers won’t do for determining bed twist. Would just be useful for tailstock alignment. A check of eBay shows precision machinists levels starting at less than $30, but “you usually get what you pay for”.

Steve Haskell

On Jun 14, 2019, at 9:32 PM, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Is it possible to discern whether a measurement difference between ends of an alignment bar is due to tailstock misalignment or bed twist?

I guess the first thing is to get the tailstock alignment correct with the tailstock right at at the headstock.

When I got my lathe back about 1968 it had very little bed wear and I have not put too many miles on it.

In practice I have never paid much attention to twist because I do not generally work with long stock. Years ago I borrowed a precision level from work and leveled the bed. I moved in 1985 and since the bed had an adjustable tail end base I just loosened the set screws to let it settle out and then snugged them again, tightening each a little at a time, back and forth. It is on a heavy steel cabinet.

I looked at the Edge Technology web site. Much of their product line is affordable for a hobby situation.

Steve Bartlett


From: Steven H
Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 23:09:02 EDT

What you are describing - an alignment bar placed between centers - is one way of checking and setting the tailstock alignment both horizontally and vertically. These alignment bars are commercially available - Edge Technology makes one that is 12??? long. Don???t know if such an item could be used to check for lathe bed twist, but if the idea would work, the bar should be max length the lathe can hold between centers.

Steve Haskell


Re: Precision level needed or not?

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Yes, it is possible to determine whether measurement differences between ends of an alignment bar are due to tailstock offset or bed twist.  Betwen centres:  Tailstock offset.  Held in chuck or otherwise directly coupled to the headstock mandrel:  Bed twist.

Mostly!

Eddie

On Saturday, 15 June 2019, 03:13:48 BST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


Another fellow earlier today said no, an alignment bar between centers won’t do for determining bed twist. Would just be useful for tailstock alignment. A check of eBay shows precision machinists levels starting at less than $30, but “you usually get what you pay for”.

Steve Haskell
> On Jun 14, 2019, at 9:32 PM, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Is it possible to discern whether a measurement difference between ends of an alignment bar is due to tailstock misalignment or bed twist?
>
> I guess the first thing is to get the tailstock alignment correct with the tailstock right at at the headstock.
>
> When I got my lathe back about 1968 it had very little bed wear and I have not put too many miles on it.
>
> In practice I have never paid much attention to twist because I do not generally work with long stock.  Years ago I borrowed a precision level from work and leveled the bed.  I moved in 1985 and since the bed had an adjustable tail end base I just loosened the set screws to let it settle out and then snugged them again, tightening each a little at a time, back and forth.  It is on a heavy steel cabinet.
>
> I looked at the Edge Technology web site.  Much of their product line is affordable for a hobby situation.
>
> Steve Bartlett
>
>
> From: Steven H
> Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 23:09:02 EDT
>
> What you are describing - an alignment bar placed between centers - is one way of checking and setting the tailstock alignment both horizontally and vertically. These alignment bars are commercially available - Edge Technology makes one that is 12??? long. Don???t know if such an item could be used to check for lathe bed twist, but if the idea would work, the bar should be max length the lathe can hold between centers.
>
> Steve Haskell
>
>
>



Re: Precision level needed or not?

Jim_B
 

When setting up a lathe to remove twisting you do not EVER use a tailstock. 
Please read “Rollies Dads Method”


Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Jun 15, 2019, at 1:32 PM, eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:

Yes, it is possible to determine whether measurement differences between ends of an alignment bar are due to tailstock offset or bed twist.  Betwen centres:  Tailstock offset.  Held in chuck or otherwise directly coupled to the headstock mandrel:  Bed twist.

Mostly!

Eddie

On Saturday, 15 June 2019, 03:13:48 BST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


Another fellow earlier today said no, an alignment bar between centers won’t do for determining bed twist. Would just be useful for tailstock alignment. A check of eBay shows precision machinists levels starting at less than $30, but “you usually get what you pay for”.

Steve Haskell
> On Jun 14, 2019, at 9:32 PM, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Is it possible to discern whether a measurement difference between ends of an alignment bar is due to tailstock misalignment or bed twist?
>
> I guess the first thing is to get the tailstock alignment correct with the tailstock right at at the headstock.
>
> When I got my lathe back about 1968 it had very little bed wear and I have not put too many miles on it.
>
> In practice I have never paid much attention to twist because I do not generally work with long stock.  Years ago I borrowed a precision level from work and leveled the bed.  I moved in 1985 and since the bed had an adjustable tail end base I just loosened the set screws to let it settle out and then snugged them again, tightening each a little at a time, back and forth.  It is on a heavy steel cabinet.
>
> I looked at the Edge Technology web site.  Much of their product line is affordable for a hobby situation.
>
> Steve Bartlett
>
>
> From: Steven H
> Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 23:09:02 EDT
>
> What you are describing - an alignment bar placed between centers - is one way of checking and setting the tailstock alignment both horizontally and vertically. These alignment bars are commercially available - Edge Technology makes one that is 12??? long. Don???t know if such an item could be used to check for lathe bed twist, but if the idea would work, the bar should be max length the lathe can hold between centers.
>
> Steve Haskell
>
>
>





--
Jim B

Re: Precision level needed or not?

glenn brooks
 

What I learned from my old worn out big iron Standard Modern 12” lathe, was that there are really two kinds of bed twist: most common on heavily used, old machines is bed wear - and related machine wear. The other thing is simply uneven flooring, causing the bed casting to sag and twist out of shape over time.  

If your machine exhibits signs of wear from its decades of life, all the parts will be worn in concert with each other - underneath the tail stock, cross slide, bearings, lead screws and of course the ways - likely having the most wear just outside where the chuck sits.  

So the challenge is to straighten the ways to counteract a possible sloping floor, and then, twist the bed to counteract all the wear - eventually finding the sweet spot that most resembles the original true surface of the ways.  

That’s the main reason I like to use a level (and a straight edge). It’s fairly easy to assess various amounts of twist in the different segments of the bed with a level. Hard to do with other methods...

Glenn 


On Jun 15, 2019, at 3:38 PM, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:

When setting up a lathe to remove twisting you do not EVER use a tailstock. 
Please read “Rollies Dads Method”


Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Jun 15, 2019, at 1:32 PM, eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:

Yes, it is possible to determine whether measurement differences between ends of an alignment bar are due to tailstock offset or bed twist.  Betwen centres:  Tailstock offset.  Held in chuck or otherwise directly coupled to the headstock mandrel:  Bed twist.

Mostly!

Eddie

On Saturday, 15 June 2019, 03:13:48 BST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


Another fellow earlier today said no, an alignment bar between centers won’t do for determining bed twist. Would just be useful for tailstock alignment. A check of eBay shows precision machinists levels starting at less than $30, but “you usually get what you pay for”.

Steve Haskell
> On Jun 14, 2019, at 9:32 PM, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Is it possible to discern whether a measurement difference between ends of an alignment bar is due to tailstock misalignment or bed twist?
>
> I guess the first thing is to get the tailstock alignment correct with the tailstock right at at the headstock.
>
> When I got my lathe back about 1968 it had very little bed wear and I have not put too many miles on it.
>
> In practice I have never paid much attention to twist because I do not generally work with long stock.  Years ago I borrowed a precision level from work and leveled the bed.  I moved in 1985 and since the bed had an adjustable tail end base I just loosened the set screws to let it settle out and then snugged them again, tightening each a little at a time, back and forth.  It is on a heavy steel cabinet.
>
> I looked at the Edge Technology web site.  Much of their product line is affordable for a hobby situation.
>
> Steve Bartlett
>
>
> From: Steven H
> Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 23:09:02 EDT
>
> What you are describing - an alignment bar placed between centers - is one way of checking and setting the tailstock alignment both horizontally and vertically. These alignment bars are commercially available - Edge Technology makes one that is 12??? long. Don???t know if such an item could be used to check for lathe bed twist, but if the idea would work, the bar should be max length the lathe can hold between centers.
>
> Steve Haskell
>
>
>





--
Jim B

Re: Precision level needed or not?

Stephen Bartlett
 

Where would that be found?

Steve Bartlett

Re: Precision level needed or not?
From: Jim_B
Date: Sat, 15 Jun 2019 18:38:46 EDT

When setting up a lathe to remove twisting you do not EVER use a tailstock.
Please read ???Rollies Dads Method???


Sent from my MacBook

Jim B.

Re: Precision level needed or not?

Jim_B
 

Should be in files section.
If not Google is your friend.


Sent from my iPhone-8
Jim B,

On Jun 16, 2019, at 11:26 AM, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Where would that be found?

Steve Bartlett

Re: Precision level needed or not?
From: Jim_B
Date: Sat, 15 Jun 2019 18:38:46 EDT

When setting up a lathe to remove twisting you do not EVER use a tailstock.
Please read ???Rollies Dads Method???


Sent from my MacBook

Jim B.


--
Jim B

Re: Precision level needed or not?

Steven H
 

Attached is Rollies Dad's Method of Lathe Alignment and another article on lathe alignment.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim_B <jim@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Jun 16, 2019 11:57 am
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Precision level needed or not?

Should be in files section.
If not Google is your friend.


-8
Jim B,

> On Jun 16, 2019, at 11:26 AM, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Where would that be found?
>
> Steve Bartlett
>
> Re: Precision level needed or not?
> From: Jim_B
> Date: Sat, 15 Jun 2019 18:38:46 EDT
>
> When setting up a lathe to remove twisting you do not EVER use a tailstock.
> Please read ???Rollies Dads Method???
>
>
> Sent from my MacBook
>
> Jim B.
>
>
>



--
Jim B


Your Old Time Bookstore Closing Sale EXTENDED - Save 60% site wide!

Steven H
 

YOTB took over the inventory of books from Lindsay Publications several years ago.

Steve Haskell
Troy, MI

Begin forwarded message:

From: Your Old Time Bookstore <youroldtimebookstore.com@...>
Date: June 29, 2019 at 1:00:17 AM EDT
To: stevesmachining@...
Subject: YOTB Closing Sale EXTENDED - Save 60% site wide!
Reply-To: youroldtimebookstore.com@...

**CLOSING SALE EXTENDED!**

Due to the large volume of orders received over the past few weeks,
we have decided to continue sales until further notice.

We appreciate the support from our customers! We've been pleasantly surprised
by the amount/size of purchases and the high percentage of new clients.

We're still closing, but we have a lot of books left in stock.
We hope you'll continue purchasing and sharing our company information
with others who may be interested in our books!

Save 60% off retail price site wide -
(no Coupon Code required!)

Qualifying orders will also be eligible for
Free Shipping**
**(USPS Media Mail, U.S. orders only, minimum order total $100.
Option will appear in the drop-down menu during on-line Checkout.)**

We invite you to visit our website before it's too late!
Books are selling out quickly - order today for the best selection!

Please find our current Category Links below:
·        Aircraft
·        Alcohol
·        Boats
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(You can access our latest Product, Description, and Master Lists at the top.)

**PLEASE NOTE: Our website is accepting orders,
but our office & warehouse are temporarily closed.

Customer Service & Order Processing
will resume Mon., June 24, 2019.**

Thanks for your business -
we appreciate your support!

Your Old Time Bookstore

Re: Your Old Time Bookstore Closing Sale EXTENDED - Save 60% site wide!

Nelson Collar
 

They have been going out business since they bought Lindsey out. I wonder if it is just a ploy they use to sell what they have left over. I wonder????

On Saturday, June 29, 2019, 06:42:48 AM CDT, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


YOTB took over the inventory of books from Lindsay Publications several years ago.

Steve Haskell
Troy, MI

Begin forwarded message:

From: Your Old Time Bookstore <youroldtimebookstore.com@...>
Date: June 29, 2019 at 1:00:17 AM EDT
To: stevesmachining@...
Subject: YOTB Closing Sale EXTENDED - Save 60% site wide!
Reply-To: youroldtimebookstore.com@...

**CLOSING SALE EXTENDED!**

Due to the large volume of orders received over the past few weeks,
we have decided to continue sales until further notice.

We appreciate the support from our customers! We've been pleasantly surprised
by the amount/size of purchases and the high percentage of new clients.

We're still closing, but we have a lot of books left in stock.
We hope you'll continue purchasing and sharing our company information
with others who may be interested in our books!

Save 60% off retail price site wide -
(no Coupon Code required!)

Qualifying orders will also be eligible for
Free Shipping**
**(USPS Media Mail, U.S. orders only, minimum order total $100.
Option will appear in the drop-down menu during on-line Checkout.)**

We invite you to visit our website before it's too late!
Books are selling out quickly - order today for the best selection!

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Looking to buy a handwheel for apron for Heavy 10

vinnito1@...
 

I recently purchased a 1941 10L that has a damaged handwheel on the apron. Does anyone have a spare that they would be willing to sell to me.

Re: Looking to buy a handwheel for apron for Heavy 10

Jim_B
 

Try Ted


-8
Jim B,

On Jul 8, 2019, at 9:19 AM, vinnito1 via Groups.Io <vinnito1@...> wrote:

I recently purchased a 1941 10L that has a damaged handwheel on the apron. Does anyone have a spare that they would be willing to sell to me.

--
Jim B

Re: Looking to buy a handwheel for apron for Heavy 10

Guenther Paul
 

Jim 
If you cant find a used hand wheel you can get one a McMaster Carr  you may have to do some machining on it

GP


On Monday, July 8, 2019, 10:09:18 AM EDT, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


Try Ted


-8
Jim B,

On Jul 8, 2019, at 9:19 AM, vinnito1 via Groups.Io <vinnito1@...> wrote:

I recently purchased a 1941 10L that has a damaged handwheel on the apron. Does anyone have a spare that they would be willing to sell to me.

--
Jim B

Re: Looking to buy a handwheel for apron for Heavy 10

Jim_B
 

Yes you can find similar hand wheels at Both McMasters and MSC. 
They will work but need to be fitted to the Heavy 10 shaft. 
Now a word of caution. SB did not take grate pains when installing taper pins. They are not necessarily on center or perpendicular to the shaft and no two are the same. 

I have been able to match new wheels to old shafts by holding the old shaft in a collet or chuck. Setting my shop made cross drilling attachment to match the angle and offset and then drilling through the new collar. 

If you want I can post a how-to


Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:01 AM, Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:

Jim 
If you cant find a used hand wheel you can get one a McMaster Carr  you may have to do some machining on it

GP


On Monday, July 8, 2019, 10:09:18 AM EDT, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


Try Ted


-8
Jim B,

On Jul 8, 2019, at 9:19 AM, vinnito1 via Groups.Io <vinnito1@...> wrote:

I recently purchased a 1941 10L that has a damaged handwheel on the apron. Does anyone have a spare that they would be willing to sell to me.

--
Jim B


--
Jim B

Re: Looking to buy a handwheel for apron for Heavy 10

Bill in OKC too
 

That would be a good thing for me, and I expect others will agree.

Bill in OKC



On Mon, Jul 8, 2019 at 11:21 AM -0500, "Jim_B" <jim@...> wrote:

Yes you can find similar hand wheels at Both McMasters and MSC. 
They will work but need to be fitted to the Heavy 10 shaft. 
Now a word of caution. SB did not take grate pains when installing taper pins. They are not necessarily on center or perpendicular to the shaft and no two are the same. 

I have been able to match new wheels to old shafts by holding the old shaft in a collet or chuck. Setting my shop made cross drilling attachment to match the angle and offset and then drilling through the new collar. 

If you want I can post a how-to


Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:01 AM, Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:

Jim 
If you cant find a used hand wheel you can get one a McMaster Carr  you may have to do some machining on it

GP


On Monday, July 8, 2019, 10:09:18 AM EDT, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


Try Ted


-8
Jim B,

On Jul 8, 2019, at 9:19 AM, vinnito1 via Groups.Io <vinnito1@...> wrote:

I recently purchased a 1941 10L that has a damaged handwheel on the apron. Does anyone have a spare that they would be willing to sell to me.

--
Jim B


--
Jim B

Re: Looking to buy a handwheel for apron for Heavy 10

Jim_B
 


Ok Bill
First I held the shaft in my lathe. 
(This is a Tailstock Handwheel on an 9” Workshop)
I fitted a drill to the taper pin hole and using a small bubble level I rotated the drill until the bubble was level. (Lock the spindle first,so the part won’t shift after leveling} Level by rotating shaft in chuck/collet.

I then chucked up a proper drill for the Taper Pin reamer in my cross drilling fixture. I matched the height, adjusting the QC tool holder height,  of the cross drilling fixture and drill point to point. 

I rotated the cross drilling fixture so the two drills were parallel.
This picture shows the two drills aligned in height and made parallel by rotating the compound. 

I then removed the drill from the shaft and aligned the cross drilling fixture to be centered in the hole on the draft. 

I mounted the hand wheel on the shaft, securing it wit a bit of Super Glue. Be sure to position it where you want it to be 


Now you can drill through,

You have aligned the drill be wit the hole in the shaft so that should just pass through drilling the closest and furtherest sides of the hand wheel only. 
You should then use a taper pin Reamer to set the taper up.

Questions?

Sent from my MacBook
Jim B.




On Jul 8, 2019, at 1:09 PM, Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:

That would be a good thing for me, and I expect others will agree.

Bill in OKC





--
Jim B