Date   
Re: Greetings

Nelson Collar
 

Paul
What's up?


On Saturday, April 13, 2019, 11:57:43 AM CDT, Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:


Hello,

How are you doing today? 

Please can you do me a favor?


GP

Re: Greetings

Morris Mallard
 

WHAT



From: Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...>
To:
Sent: Saturday, April 13, 2019 12:57 PM
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Greetings

Hello,

How are you doing today? 

Please can you do me a favor?


GP


Greetings

Guenther Paul
 

Hello,

How are you doing today? 

Please can you do me a favor?


GP

Re: South Bend [Grizzly] SB1002 Discontinued

kalos53@...
 

Second call for SB1002 owners (we few...)
Contact me privately or on this forum.

Re: rake angle for home made carbide insert form tool (poly v pulley cutter)

mike allen
 

Colin who was the liquidator ?

        animal

On 4/7/2019 7:00 PM, Colin Fera wrote:
MkSorry I guess I wasn't very clear. I am making a tool holder for a commercial insert. I am not making the actual insert itself. The shape is a bit complex (for me anyways) so I can't readily make the tool from HSS. I could make a single point tool and cut one groove at a time.

The reasoning that brought me to this approach is 2 fold. First off I want to cut about a dozen pulleys and with a single point tool I feel like I will probably make a mistake. Second (and foremost), I picked up the insert from liquidator for 5 dollars.

I went ahead and made the tool holder. I did go with 15 degrees of negative rake but if that doesn't work I will mill off the dovetail and use it with the lantern tool post so that I can adjust the rake.  The fabrication went pretty well. I did make the dovetail a .5mm too wide and so I have a shim superglued in.

I attached a few pictures. In retrospect I also should have made the pocket come down further possibly even surrounded the insert.

Re: rake angle for home made carbide insert form tool (poly v pulley cutter)

RJ White
 

Nice work , send pictures of the pulleys when you can , i am interested in this. Thanks.


On Apr 7, 2019, at 7:00 PM, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:

MkSorry I guess I wasn't very clear. I am making a tool holder for a commercial insert. I am not making the actual insert itself. The shape is a bit complex (for me anyways) so I can't readily make the tool from HSS. I could make a single point tool and cut one groove at a time.  

The reasoning that brought me to this approach is 2 fold. First off I want to cut about a dozen pulleys and with a single point tool I feel like I will probably make a mistake. Second (and foremost), I picked up the insert from liquidator for 5 dollars. 

I went ahead and made the tool holder. I did go with 15 degrees of negative rake but if that doesn't work I will mill off the dovetail and use it with the lantern tool post so that I can adjust the rake.  The fabrication went pretty well. I did make the dovetail a .5mm too wide and so I have a shim superglued in.

I attached a few pictures. In retrospect I also should have made the pocket come down further possibly even surrounded the insert.

On Sun, Apr 7, 2019 at 5:19 PM Davis Johnson <davis@...> wrote:

Form tools often have no rake. Threading tools are the most common example.

The reason is that a form tool with rake needs the shape of the tool to differ slightly from the the desired resulting shape of finished work piece. One sacrifices cutting efficiency for a cutter shape that is easier to grind. I think with modern CAD and a CNC tool grinder it should be possible to grind a form tool with rake. If this is the way you are going I'm genuinely interested in how this turns out for you in the end.

For a timing belt pulley you may be willing to sacrifice a little shape accuracy for easier cutting, especially for a tool that wide. I don't know about timing belt pulleys, but with V-belt pulleys the ideal V angle differs with pulley diameter because of the way the belt distorts when bent around the pulley. Most folks blissfully ignore this with no ill effects.

I have no practical experience with carbide tooling and realize that carbide tools often are ground with angles that baffle me.

Have you considered using a threading tool and making multiple cuts?

If you grind a tool with rake, then mount it below the center line so the top surface of the tool is in line with a radius of the workpiece, you no longer have rake.

On 4/7/19 4:05 PM, Colin Fera wrote:
I am making a home made carbide insert form tool for use on my 9A. The insert is a k series timing belt cutter with 5 ribs that is 1/4" thick by 1inch wide. this will be used to slowly make timing belt pulleys and needs to plunge to a depth of about .125". I designed the tool in fusion 360 and am making it from 1018. 

So the question is regarding the rake angle. The insert is flat with no built in clearance or rake angle and is as mentioned very thick (1/4"). 

As designed I am putting in about 15 deg of negative rake to provide end clearance for the nose of the tool while keeping the insert fully supported. Another possible option would be to set the insert parallel to the tool (0 deg) and provide end clearance by setting the tool well below the center line of the spindle.  Since this is making a pulley the smallest diameter I can imagine making with it would be about 1.5". 

I could also make the tool fit the old lantern tool post that I have so that the angle is easy to adjust. 

Does anyone have any thoughts on which is preferable?  This tool will be used very slowly in aluminum  

<IMG_20190407_185405.jpg>
<IMG_20190407_185417.jpg>

Re: rake angle for home made carbide insert form tool (poly v pulley cutter)

Colin Fera
 

MkSorry I guess I wasn't very clear. I am making a tool holder for a commercial insert. I am not making the actual insert itself. The shape is a bit complex (for me anyways) so I can't readily make the tool from HSS. I could make a single point tool and cut one groove at a time.  

The reasoning that brought me to this approach is 2 fold. First off I want to cut about a dozen pulleys and with a single point tool I feel like I will probably make a mistake. Second (and foremost), I picked up the insert from liquidator for 5 dollars. 

I went ahead and made the tool holder. I did go with 15 degrees of negative rake but if that doesn't work I will mill off the dovetail and use it with the lantern tool post so that I can adjust the rake.  The fabrication went pretty well. I did make the dovetail a .5mm too wide and so I have a shim superglued in.

I attached a few pictures. In retrospect I also should have made the pocket come down further possibly even surrounded the insert.


On Sun, Apr 7, 2019 at 5:19 PM Davis Johnson <davis@...> wrote:

Form tools often have no rake. Threading tools are the most common example.

The reason is that a form tool with rake needs the shape of the tool to differ slightly from the the desired resulting shape of finished work piece. One sacrifices cutting efficiency for a cutter shape that is easier to grind. I think with modern CAD and a CNC tool grinder it should be possible to grind a form tool with rake. If this is the way you are going I'm genuinely interested in how this turns out for you in the end.

For a timing belt pulley you may be willing to sacrifice a little shape accuracy for easier cutting, especially for a tool that wide. I don't know about timing belt pulleys, but with V-belt pulleys the ideal V angle differs with pulley diameter because of the way the belt distorts when bent around the pulley. Most folks blissfully ignore this with no ill effects.

I have no practical experience with carbide tooling and realize that carbide tools often are ground with angles that baffle me.

Have you considered using a threading tool and making multiple cuts?

If you grind a tool with rake, then mount it below the center line so the top surface of the tool is in line with a radius of the workpiece, you no longer have rake.

On 4/7/19 4:05 PM, Colin Fera wrote:
I am making a home made carbide insert form tool for use on my 9A. The insert is a k series timing belt cutter with 5 ribs that is 1/4" thick by 1inch wide. this will be used to slowly make timing belt pulleys and needs to plunge to a depth of about .125". I designed the tool in fusion 360 and am making it from 1018. 

So the question is regarding the rake angle. The insert is flat with no built in clearance or rake angle and is as mentioned very thick (1/4"). 

As designed I am putting in about 15 deg of negative rake to provide end clearance for the nose of the tool while keeping the insert fully supported. Another possible option would be to set the insert parallel to the tool (0 deg) and provide end clearance by setting the tool well below the center line of the spindle.  Since this is making a pulley the smallest diameter I can imagine making with it would be about 1.5". 

I could also make the tool fit the old lantern tool post that I have so that the angle is easy to adjust. 

Does anyone have any thoughts on which is preferable?  This tool will be used very slowly in aluminum  

Re: rake angle for home made carbide insert form tool (poly v pulley cutter)

Davis Johnson
 

Form tools often have no rake. Threading tools are the most common example.

The reason is that a form tool with rake needs the shape of the tool to differ slightly from the the desired resulting shape of finished work piece. One sacrifices cutting efficiency for a cutter shape that is easier to grind. I think with modern CAD and a CNC tool grinder it should be possible to grind a form tool with rake. If this is the way you are going I'm genuinely interested in how this turns out for you in the end.

For a timing belt pulley you may be willing to sacrifice a little shape accuracy for easier cutting, especially for a tool that wide. I don't know about timing belt pulleys, but with V-belt pulleys the ideal V angle differs with pulley diameter because of the way the belt distorts when bent around the pulley. Most folks blissfully ignore this with no ill effects.

I have no practical experience with carbide tooling and realize that carbide tools often are ground with angles that baffle me.

Have you considered using a threading tool and making multiple cuts?

If you grind a tool with rake, then mount it below the center line so the top surface of the tool is in line with a radius of the workpiece, you no longer have rake.

On 4/7/19 4:05 PM, Colin Fera wrote:
I am making a home made carbide insert form tool for use on my 9A. The insert is a k series timing belt cutter with 5 ribs that is 1/4" thick by 1inch wide. this will be used to slowly make timing belt pulleys and needs to plunge to a depth of about .125". I designed the tool in fusion 360 and am making it from 1018. 

So the question is regarding the rake angle. The insert is flat with no built in clearance or rake angle and is as mentioned very thick (1/4"). 

As designed I am putting in about 15 deg of negative rake to provide end clearance for the nose of the tool while keeping the insert fully supported. Another possible option would be to set the insert parallel to the tool (0 deg) and provide end clearance by setting the tool well below the center line of the spindle.  Since this is making a pulley the smallest diameter I can imagine making with it would be about 1.5". 

I could also make the tool fit the old lantern tool post that I have so that the angle is easy to adjust. 

Does anyone have any thoughts on which is preferable?  This tool will be used very slowly in aluminum  

Re: rake angle for home made carbide insert form tool (poly v pulley cutter)

Guenther Paul
 

Colin
You want to run aluminum at high speed also use cutting fluid ( i use WD-40 ) you will get a better finish

GP


On Sunday, April 7, 2019, 6:00:57 PM EDT, Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:


Why do you waist your time making a carbide cutter to machine aluminum. A HHS tool bit will cut any grade of aluminum you want to machine  

GP


On Sunday, April 7, 2019, 5:45:18 PM EDT, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:


I am making a home made carbide insert form tool for use on my 9A. The insert is a k series timing belt cutter with 5 ribs that is 1/4" thick by 1inch wide. this will be used to slowly make timing belt pulleys and needs to plunge to a depth of about .125". I designed the tool in fusion 360 and am making it from 1018. 

So the question is regarding the rake angle. The insert is flat with no built in clearance or rake angle and is as mentioned very thick (1/4"). 

As designed I am putting in about 15 deg of negative rake to provide end clearance for the nose of the tool while keeping the insert fully supported. Another possible option would be to set the insert parallel to the tool (0 deg) and provide end clearance by setting the tool well below the center line of the spindle.  Since this is making a pulley the smallest diameter I can imagine making with it would be about 1.5". 

I could also make the tool fit the old lantern tool post that I have so that the angle is easy to adjust. 

Does anyone have any thoughts on which is preferable?  This tool will be used very slowly in aluminum  

Re: rake angle for home made carbide insert form tool (poly v pulley cutter)

Guenther Paul
 

Why do you waist your time making a carbide cutter to machine aluminum. A HHS tool bit will cut any grade of aluminum you want to machine  

GP


On Sunday, April 7, 2019, 5:45:18 PM EDT, Colin Fera <colin.fera@...> wrote:


I am making a home made carbide insert form tool for use on my 9A. The insert is a k series timing belt cutter with 5 ribs that is 1/4" thick by 1inch wide. this will be used to slowly make timing belt pulleys and needs to plunge to a depth of about .125". I designed the tool in fusion 360 and am making it from 1018. 

So the question is regarding the rake angle. The insert is flat with no built in clearance or rake angle and is as mentioned very thick (1/4"). 

As designed I am putting in about 15 deg of negative rake to provide end clearance for the nose of the tool while keeping the insert fully supported. Another possible option would be to set the insert parallel to the tool (0 deg) and provide end clearance by setting the tool well below the center line of the spindle.  Since this is making a pulley the smallest diameter I can imagine making with it would be about 1.5". 

I could also make the tool fit the old lantern tool post that I have so that the angle is easy to adjust. 

Does anyone have any thoughts on which is preferable?  This tool will be used very slowly in aluminum  

rake angle for home made carbide insert form tool (poly v pulley cutter)

Colin Fera
 

I am making a home made carbide insert form tool for use on my 9A. The insert is a k series timing belt cutter with 5 ribs that is 1/4" thick by 1inch wide. this will be used to slowly make timing belt pulleys and needs to plunge to a depth of about .125". I designed the tool in fusion 360 and am making it from 1018. 

So the question is regarding the rake angle. The insert is flat with no built in clearance or rake angle and is as mentioned very thick (1/4"). 

As designed I am putting in about 15 deg of negative rake to provide end clearance for the nose of the tool while keeping the insert fully supported. Another possible option would be to set the insert parallel to the tool (0 deg) and provide end clearance by setting the tool well below the center line of the spindle.  Since this is making a pulley the smallest diameter I can imagine making with it would be about 1.5". 

I could also make the tool fit the old lantern tool post that I have so that the angle is easy to adjust. 

Does anyone have any thoughts on which is preferable?  This tool will be used very slowly in aluminum  

Re: SBL in WW II?

glenn brooks
 

What is interesting is that the unit insignia on the Jeep means this service man was assigned to the 4th Australian armored brigade , and the photo was taken between mid summer, 1944 and sometime early 1945, somewhere in Australia.

I tried several times to extract background imagery from the photo to determine location, but was never able to discern if palms or trees or whether beach or desert landscape due to the vagueness of the overexposed digital image. If someone contacted one of the regimental war museums connected to the brigade it might be possible to learn what kind of lathe it is, and where the photo was taken.

Glenn B.

On Apr 5, 2019, at 5:41 AM, Paolo Amedeo <machineshop@...> wrote:

Given the low resolution it's hard to see. I believe it has flat ways and, to me, it looks like a typical British small gap-bed lathe. The foot under the headstock should be a distinctive feature for anybody familiar with British lathes.

Paolo

On 4/5/2019 09:27, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io wrote:
I just received this in a large collection of Jeep photos from World War II.

It might be a south Bend mounted on the back of the Jeep.

Steve Bartlett

Re: SBL in WW II?

Paolo Amedeo
 

Given the low resolution it's hard to see. I believe it has flat ways and, to me, it looks like a typical British small gap-bed lathe. The foot under the headstock should be a distinctive feature for anybody familiar with British lathes.

Paolo

On 4/5/2019 09:27, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io wrote:
I just received this in a large collection of Jeep photos from World War II.

It might be a south Bend mounted on the back of the Jeep.

Steve Bartlett

Re: SBL in WW II?

Carl Bukowsky
 

Dumb smartphone ...leave my “gitter done” alone!

Sent by my iPhone

On Apr 5, 2019, at 9:18 AM, Carl W Bukowsky <cwbukows@...> wrote:

Steve,

That photo has been around the forums for awhile, and it’s been determined it’s not a SB Lathe. Yes, interesting and I’m sure that just one of many transportable lathes that were in the frontlines. Others have posted images of lathes in the back of big trucks, along with other machines for working in combat. Where there’s a will they figured a way to hitter done! Thanks for the photo! Carl
Sent by my iPhone

On Apr 5, 2019, at 8:27 AM, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

I just received this in a large collection of Jeep photos from World War II.

It might be a south Bend mounted on the back of the Jeep.

Steve Bartlett



<SouthBendJeep.jpg>

Re: SBL in WW II?

m. allan noah
 

Yeah, someone posts this image every few months, and it is still not a
south bend :)

allan

On Fri, Apr 5, 2019 at 9:28 AM Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io
<tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

I just received this in a large collection of Jeep photos from World War II.

It might be a south Bend mounted on the back of the Jeep.

Steve Bartlett



--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"

Re: SBL in WW II?

Carl Bukowsky
 

Steve,

That photo has been around the forums for awhile, and it’s been determined it’s not a SB Lathe. Yes, interesting and I’m sure that just one of many transportable lathes that were in the frontlines. Others have posted images of lathes in the back of big trucks, along with other machines for working in combat. Where there’s a will they figured a way to hitter done! Thanks for the photo! Carl
Sent by my iPhone

On Apr 5, 2019, at 8:27 AM, Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

I just received this in a large collection of Jeep photos from World War II.

It might be a south Bend mounted on the back of the Jeep.

Steve Bartlett



<SouthBendJeep.jpg>

SBL in WW II?

Stephen Bartlett
 

I just received this in a large collection of Jeep photos from World War II.

It might be a south Bend mounted on the back of the Jeep.

Steve Bartlett

Re: 9" with risers(?) on Craigslist Long Island, NY

George Meinschein
 

Tyler,
Ah, yes. I see that now.
-George

On Thu, Apr 4, 2019, 8:22 PM Tyler via Groups.Io <lezottay=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
George,
That appears to be a model 405. Note the open tailstock casting. They're similar to the later 9C but the spindle is 1 3/8-10 thread.

Re: 9" with risers(?) on Craigslist Long Island, NY

Tyler
 

George,
That appears to be a model 405. Note the open tailstock casting. They're similar to the later 9C but the spindle is 1 3/8-10 thread.

9" with risers(?) on Craigslist Long Island, NY

George Meinschein
 

Group,

I just noticed this one for sale on Craigslist.  I don't recall having ever seen a setup like this before and I've NEVER seen a South Bend for sale yet that had the actual quill still with the tailstock.  $1200 seems a little pricey for a 9C, but maybe the risers justify the price.  I don't know, but maybe someone here might be interested.

https://longisland.craigslist.org/for/d/freeport-south-bend-professional-9/6856013659.html

-- 
Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

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