Date   

Re: Large Drills in the headstock

Morris Mallard <morrismallard@...>
 


From: "eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io" <eddie.draper@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 3:07 AM
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Large Drills in the headstock

Assuming you can somehow fit the no3 MT drills in the headstock mandrel, then, whilst you can set jobs up on the cross slide, beware of the large forces involved.  An alternative option is to fit a flat pad into the tailstock and you can use it like a drill press for drilling long members, e.g. angle iron.  A rope from a roof member is probably safer than holding the end, and use the tool post to stop the workpiece pulling forward a long way on breakthrough.

Eddie

On Tuesday, 8 January 2019, 03:50:20 GMT, Roger Bickers via Groups.Io <mr.concrete1964@...> wrote:


Whats the bore size of your spindle? If its the large hole, then get a 13" spindle sleeve adapter, its sized for a #3 mt. Roger


On Mon, Jan 7, 2019 at 10:44 PM, Don Verdiani via Groups.Io
<DLVerdiani@...> wrote:
I'm a Heavy 10 guy. I find myself with a bunch of greater than 3/4" #3 Morse taper shank drills and am wondering. I could easily make a sleeve to put #3 MT drills in the S/B spindle. I have a sleeve with a  #2 MT, no big deal to make another for #3.  It means learning to set work up on the cross slide, but I bet I can figure that out. Anyone tried this? Is it worth doing?

Don V.
West Chester, PA



Re: Large Drills in the headstock

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Assuming you can somehow fit the no3 MT drills in the headstock mandrel, then, whilst you can set jobs up on the cross slide, beware of the large forces involved.  An alternative option is to fit a flat pad into the tailstock and you can use it like a drill press for drilling long members, e.g. angle iron.  A rope from a roof member is probably safer than holding the end, and use the tool post to stop the workpiece pulling forward a long way on breakthrough.

Eddie

On Tuesday, 8 January 2019, 03:50:20 GMT, Roger Bickers via Groups.Io <mr.concrete1964@...> wrote:


Whats the bore size of your spindle? If its the large hole, then get a 13" spindle sleeve adapter, its sized for a #3 mt. Roger


On Mon, Jan 7, 2019 at 10:44 PM, Don Verdiani via Groups.Io
<DLVerdiani@...> wrote:
I'm a Heavy 10 guy. I find myself with a bunch of greater than 3/4" #3 Morse taper shank drills and am wondering. I could easily make a sleeve to put #3 MT drills in the S/B spindle. I have a sleeve with a  #2 MT, no big deal to make another for #3.  It means learning to set work up on the cross slide, but I bet I can figure that out. Anyone tried this? Is it worth doing?

Don V.
West Chester, PA


Re: Large Drills in the headstock

Roger Bickers
 

Whats the bore size of your spindle? If its the large hole, then get a 13" spindle sleeve adapter, its sized for a #3 mt. Roger


On Mon, Jan 7, 2019 at 10:44 PM, Don Verdiani via Groups.Io
<DLVerdiani@...> wrote:
I'm a Heavy 10 guy. I find myself with a bunch of greater than 3/4" #3 Morse taper shank drills and am wondering. I could easily make a sleeve to put #3 MT drills in the S/B spindle. I have a sleeve with a  #2 MT, no big deal to make another for #3.  It means learning to set work up on the cross slide, but I bet I can figure that out. Anyone tried this? Is it worth doing?

Don V.
West Chester, PA


Large Drills in the headstock

Don Verdiani
 

I'm a Heavy 10 guy. I find myself with a bunch of greater than 3/4" #3 Morse taper shank drills and am wondering. I could easily make a sleeve to put #3 MT drills in the S/B spindle. I have a sleeve with a  #2 MT, no big deal to make another for #3.  It means learning to set work up on the cross slide, but I bet I can figure that out. Anyone tried this? Is it worth doing?

Don V.
West Chester, PA


Re: Metric Change Gears for South Bend 16 Single Tumbler

m. allan noah
 

I'm also pretty active here, when life allows :)

The south bend single tumbler machines make it difficult to produce
perfect metric threads, because of all the hardware you have to swap.
But, they make it easy to get close, using a multiple of 17 to replace
a multiple of 18. That makes the leadscrew act like it is 3.3333 mm
pitch, which works pretty well with the divisions and multiples in the
gearbox.

Let us know if you have any other questions, based on that PM thread
martik linked to.

allan

On Mon, Jan 7, 2019 at 12:18 AM Marti <martik777@gmail.com> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Looks like you could cut most common metrics with a 32 and 34 tooth stud gear. (assuming yours is 36, if it's 18, then you'd need a 16 and 17)

See here:
https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/metric-threads-16-sb-231828/

kitno455 is still active so you could PM him.

I cut all my metric threads by just changing the stud gear on my 9A (no transposing gear set needed) and it has been close enough every time.
--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"


Re: Metric Change Gears for South Bend 16 Single Tumbler

Marti
 
Edited

Looks like you could cut most common metrics with a 32 and 34 tooth stud gear. (assuming yours is 36, if it's 18, then you'd need a 16 and 17)

See here:
https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/metric-threads-16-sb-231828/

kitno455 is still active so you could PM him.

I cut all my metric threads by just changing the stud gear on my 9A (no transposing gear set needed) and it has been close enough every time.


Re: STL files for metric change gears

Bill Libecap
 

Hi Allan

I understand your confusion. Yes I have the standard narrow range double
tumbler gearbox on your 10L, that goes from 4 to 224. My mistake when copying from a previous thread. I have a 20 or 40 gear on the top driving an 80 or 84 idler gear with a 56 on the bottom.

Bill


Metric Change Gears for South Bend 16 Single Tumbler

James Rice
 

Does anyone know what gears or parts are needed to cut metric threads on a South Bend 16 with the single tumbler gearbox?  It seems information is all over the web for the double tumbler lathes and I do know that South bend used to supply a metric gear kit for these lathes but they were always listed as "Inquire for more information" in the catalogs I see scanned into pdf  files.

I'm finally getting back on reconditioning my South Bend 16 after taking several years off to go back to college.

James


Re: STL files for metric change gears

m. allan noah
 

Bill, I am confused. It sounds like you have the narrow range double
tumbler gearbox on your 10L, but I thought that went from 4 to 224
TPI, just like the 9A and 10K?

allan

On Fri, Jan 4, 2019 at 10:17 PM Bill Libecap <blibecap@gmail.com> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Hey Alan
Is there a similar solution for those of us that don't have a 48 tooth stud gear?

I have the gearbox that covers the range of 2 to 112 TPI, I have a 20 or 40 tooth gear on the stud. Are there a couple of gears that we could use and get a selection of metric threads? I have a heavy 10 with a dual lever gearbox.
--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"


Re: STL files for metric change gears

Bill Libecap
 
Edited

Hey Alan 
Is there a similar solution for those of us that don't have a 48 tooth stud gear? 

I have the gearbox that covers the range of 2 to 112 TPI, I have a 20 or 40 tooth gear on the stud. Are there a couple of gears that we could use and get a selection of metric threads? I have a heavy 10 with a dual lever gearbox. 


Re: SB9

Nathan Baynes
 

Even if somewhat familiar, I would say just the part on rebuilding the QCGB would be worth the purchase price!! It’s an excellent resource!
Nate


Re: SB9

Bill in OKC too
 

I bought the rebuild kit for my 10L, and the book has already been invaluable, and I've not got the lathe completely apart yet. Just the tailstock, taper attachment, saddle and compound. You might not need it if you've been playing with South Bend lathes for years or decades. I last played with one (and I no longer remember even which one it was) in high school in 1973. Depending on your level of experience, it may not be essential, or it may just be exactly essential.

Bill in OKC

On Friday, January 4, 2019, 1:07:52 PM CST, William Brown <bigwilliebrown@...> wrote:




On Thu, Jan 3, 2019, 12:00 PM Roger Bickers via Groups.Io <mr.concrete1964=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The tag that people need to see will have "swing", "length of bed", and "catalog no." on it.  Also include a pic of the apron face. 
If your carriage rocks, on the back of the carriage  and underneath it,  there should be a bar with 3 bolts ... tighten the bolts and see if that helps. Also look for a ridge on the front "v" way.... if its enough to catch your finger nail on, thats part of the problem.  
Is your bed width 6 or 7" wide?   Roger 
Unfortunately there is no such tag. My bed is 48 inches long and it is 5 1/2 inches wide. The center of the spindle is 4 1/2 inches above the bed. I have not measured everything on it but I'm pretty sure it's a 9 by 48. The research I've done has convinced me it's late 1938 or early 1939 manufactured date. I'm probably going to buy the rebuild kit off of Amazon and try to rebuild it. 


Re: SB9

Jim_B
 

Before you buy anything you need to know WHICH 9” lathe you have. 
Please post a picture. 

-8
Jim B,

On Jan 4, 2019, at 2:07 PM, William Brown <bigwilliebrown@...> wrote:




Unfortunately there is no such tag. My bed is 48 inches long and it is 5 1/2 inches wide. The center of the spindle is 4 1/2 inches above the bed. I have not measured everything on it but I'm pretty sure it's a 9 by 48. The research I've done has convinced me it's late 1938 or early 1939 manufactured date. I'm probably going to buy the rebuild kit off of Amazon and try to rebuild it. 


--
Jim B


Re: SB9

William Brown
 

Thank you for your help. I have more time than money at this point so I'm trying to find a 5 dollar way to fix a 10 dollar problem ! This lathe was used ( actually abused ) by a gunsmiths near my Dad for years so I'm not going to be able to wipe it down, grease it up, and run the heck out of it. It has some wear but I think it is still fixable.


On Wed, Jan 2, 2019, 11:18 PM Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:
Go to vitagemachines.org  you may find the info you are looking for also ask the owner Toni

GP

--------------------------------------- 


Re: SB9

William Brown
 



On Thu, Jan 3, 2019, 12:00 PM Roger Bickers via Groups.Io <mr.concrete1964=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The tag that people need to see will have "swing", "length of bed", and "catalog no." on it.  Also include a pic of the apron face. 
If your carriage rocks, on the back of the carriage  and underneath it,  there should be a bar with 3 bolts ... tighten the bolts and see if that helps. Also look for a ridge on the front "v" way.... if its enough to catch your finger nail on, thats part of the problem.  
Is your bed width 6 or 7" wide?   Roger 
Unfortunately there is no such tag. My bed is 48 inches long and it is 5 1/2 inches wide. The center of the spindle is 4 1/2 inches above the bed. I have not measured everything on it but I'm pretty sure it's a 9 by 48. The research I've done has convinced me it's late 1938 or early 1939 manufactured date. I'm probably going to buy the rebuild kit off of Amazon and try to rebuild it. 


Re: STL files for metric change gears

m. allan noah
 

So, the 10L single tumbler is generally the same as the wide bed 9"
single tumbler, at least from the gearing standpoint. One difference
is that the stud gear tends to have fewer teeth, which makes the
gearbox turn slower. Hence, all the pitches are finer. So, you could
use the same 34 and 33 tooth gears, but the gearbox setting would be
different, say 8tpi instead of 4.

allan

On Thu, Jan 3, 2019 at 10:52 AM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io
<wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have a single-tumbler quick change 10L, no banjo, no extra gears at all. That is why I mentioned converting it to a non-QCGB lathe temporarily. Mind you, this is the first time I've played with a South Bend lathe since high school closing on 46 years ago. It is not yet operational as I'm de-rusting and stripping paint as I have time and energy and nothing higher priority on SWMBO's to-do list to distract me.

Bill in OKC

On Thu, Jan 3, 2019 at 7:09 AM, m. allan noah
<kitno455@gmail.com> wrote:
Bill in OKC-

If you have a loose change gear lathe, you can probably make a number
of metric threads using compounds of the gears you already have. You
should already also have a banjo, so I don't understand that part of
your query. Let us know the complete list of change gears you have,
and we can see what we can do about metric threads.

allan

On Mon, Dec 31, 2018 at 8:29 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io
<wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Knew if I hung around long enough someone would answer my questions, but that's not the answer I'm looking for... ;)

Would it be possible (and practical) to add a banjo? I'm still stripping rust so I'm in no great hurry, but it would be nice to have a clue what I should be looking for while I wait. Or acquire all the stuff to convert to a non-QCGB machine for the times I need to cut metric threads? I know that would be a bunch of gears, but I'm playing with making 3D printed gears myself. And there is a gentleman on Thingiverse that has posted collections of STL files for several of the 9" SB lathes. I've already downloaded them, also just in case.

Bill in OKC


--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"




--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"


Re: SB9

Roger Bickers
 

The tag that people need to see will have "swing", "length of bed", and "catalog no." on it.  Also include a pic of the apron face. 
If your carriage rocks, on the back of the carriage  and underneath it,  there should be a bar with 3 bolts ... tighten the bolts and see if that helps. Also look for a ridge on the front "v" way.... if its enough to catch your finger nail on, thats part of the problem.  
Is your bed width 6 or 7" wide?   Roger 


On Thu, Jan 3, 2019 at 11:47 AM, William Brown
<bigwilliebrown@...> wrote:
My bed is 48 inches long. Right now the lathe and the metal table it's mounted on are beside my shop waiting for a permanent bench to be built for it. I'm keeping it covered but it was pretty Rusty and crusty when I went to get it. It has some play in between the carriage and bed that I'm not sure where to adjust out.

On Thu, Jan 3, 2019, 2:04 AM Roger Bickers via Groups.Io <mr.concrete1964=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Please post a picture of the brass tag on the end of the door, and the face of the apron where the hand wheel and hand lever are. So we can see what size lathe youve got. Thanks. Roger. 



Re: SB9

William Brown
 

My bed is 48 inches long. Right now the lathe and the metal table it's mounted on are beside my shop waiting for a permanent bench to be built for it. I'm keeping it covered but it was pretty Rusty and crusty when I went to get it. It has some play in between the carriage and bed that I'm not sure where to adjust out.


On Thu, Jan 3, 2019, 2:04 AM Roger Bickers via Groups.Io <mr.concrete1964=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Please post a picture of the brass tag on the end of the door, and the face of the apron where the hand wheel and hand lever are. So we can see what size lathe youve got. Thanks. Roger. 



Re: STL files for metric change gears

Bill in OKC too
 

I have a single-tumbler quick change 10L, no banjo, no extra gears at all. That is why I mentioned converting it to a non-QCGB lathe temporarily. Mind you, this is the first time I've played with a South Bend lathe since high school closing on 46 years ago. It is not yet operational as I'm de-rusting and stripping paint as I have time and energy and nothing higher priority on SWMBO's to-do list to distract me.

Bill in OKC 

On Thu, Jan 3, 2019 at 7:09 AM, m. allan noah
<kitno455@...> wrote:
Bill in OKC-

If you have a loose change gear lathe, you can probably make a number
of metric threads using compounds of the gears you already have. You
should already also have a banjo, so I don't understand that part of
your query. Let us know the complete list of change gears you have,
and we can see what we can do about metric threads.

allan

On Mon, Dec 31, 2018 at 8:29 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io
<wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Knew if I hung around long enough someone would answer my questions, but that's not the answer I'm looking for... ;)
>
> Would it be possible (and practical) to add a banjo? I'm still stripping rust so I'm in no great hurry, but it would be nice to have a clue what I should be looking for while I wait. Or acquire all the stuff to convert to a non-QCGB machine for the times I need to cut metric threads? I know that would be a bunch of gears, but I'm playing with making 3D printed gears myself. And there is a gentleman on Thingiverse that has posted collections of STL files for several of the 9" SB lathes. I've already downloaded them, also just in case.
>
> Bill in OKC
>



--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"



Re: STL files for metric change gears - UPDATE

Bill in OKC too
 

Do these work for a single tumbler 10L, or the later lathes? 9" lathes?

I'm finding I don't remember what you originally said on the subject.

Bill in OKC 


On Thu, Jan 3, 2019 at 6:18 AM, dar1095 via Groups.Io
<dar1095@...> wrote:
Group
  I attached the STL files for the 34 and 33 tooth gears. I made the shaft and key way opening smaller (0.002") so the gears can be fitted to the lathe.
  Doug
--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 1/1/19, Bill Libecap <blibecap@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] STL files for metric change gears - UPDATE
Date: Tuesday, January 1, 2019, 11:59 AM

QCGB  MMPT 
 %ERR  MM
3.0   5.9972  0.04630    6mm
4.5   3.9981  0.04630    4mm
6.0   2.9986  0.04630    3mm
9.0   1.9991  0.04630    2mm
12.0  1.4993  0.04630    1.5mm
18.0  0.9995  0.04630    1mm
20.0  0.8996  0.04630    .9mm
24.0  0.7497  0.04630    .8mm
36.0  0.4998  0.04630    .5mm
40.0  0.4498  0.04630    .45mm
 
A couple common fastener
pitches are not in that list, so we'll need
to make another gear (33 teeth) to pick them
up. The % error is
higher, but still good
enough for fastener use:
 
QCGB  MMPT    %ERR  mm
3.5   4.9893  0.21429   5mm
7.0   2.4946  0.21429   2.5mm
10.0  1.7462  0.21429   1.75mm
14.0  1.2473  0.21429   1.25mm 



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