Date   
Re: Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

Nfwood
 

Sir, do you have a lathe level for sale?  Have one but can't find it in my shop. Thanks

Nelson


-----Original Message-----
From: david pennington via Groups.Io <davidwpennington@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Oct 7, 2018 9:40 am
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

That is heart-warming. Thanks for sharing!

102 and was still able to drive. Awesome!

-------- Original message --------
From: "bode528 via Groups.Io" <bode528@...>
Date: 10/6/18 21:06 (GMT-06:00)
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

I'm dealing with cleaning out my Dad's shop.  For a couple years now he has been telling me to take anything I want as he won't use it anymore.  I think he finally really is at that point.  This year has been getting tougher for him to walk and he just stopped driving.  He turns 103 in December.  My brother in law and I are slowly cleaning his shop out.  I don't need much as I don't have room and my shop is much better equiped than his.   BIL took the South Bend lathe.

My Dad is the best machinist I ever met.  His handiwork is on the moon - he made parts for the moon rovers.

I can't help thinking about what my family will have to put up with to empty my shop someday.

Re: Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

david pennington
 

That is heart-warming. Thanks for sharing!

102 and was still able to drive. Awesome!

-------- Original message --------
From: "bode528 via Groups.Io" <bode528@...>
Date: 10/6/18 21:06 (GMT-06:00)
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

I'm dealing with cleaning out my Dad's shop.  For a couple years now he has been telling me to take anything I want as he won't use it anymore.  I think he finally really is at that point.  This year has been getting tougher for him to walk and he just stopped driving.  He turns 103 in December.  My brother in law and I are slowly cleaning his shop out.  I don't need much as I don't have room and my shop is much better equiped than his.   BIL took the South Bend lathe.

My Dad is the best machinist I ever met.  His handiwork is on the moon - he made parts for the moon rovers.

I can't help thinking about what my family will have to put up with to empty my shop someday.

Re: 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts

Paul Alciatore
 

Is a thread gauge accurate enough to check the screws on a lathe? Well, that depends.

A thread gauge is generally used to determine the TPI or metric pitch of an unknown thread. Thus, they are accurate enough to tell the difference between, FOR EXAMPLE, a 24 TPI and a 25 TPI thread. That is a difference of 0.00166" for one thread. But most thread gauges cover a short distance, perhaps 1/4" so that will be about 8 threads in the above EXAMPLE and they are really only accurate enough to detect an error in that distance: perhaps a quarter thread in those 8. That would be 0.010" in 0.250" or one part in 25. Different pitches will give you different numbers in this example, but the percentage of error will be about the same. 1 in 25 is a 4% error range. Now, in order to make a measurement with confidence, a good instrument should be better than the desired error allotment. So a good thread gauge will be better than that, perhaps 1% or 0.5% or even better.

But can your eyes really read a thread gauge to that level of precision. I doubt it. I would be using a good 10X magnifier (Hastings Triplet) if I really needed the best from a thread gauge.

In My Humble Opinion, a thread gauge is not a good way to detect or measure wear on a lead/feed screw. The three wire measurement suggestion will tell you WHAT the pitch diameter is, but not how much it has changed unless you know what it was originally. I guess you can take two or more readings, at the places suspected of the most wear and at the far, mostly unused end. But a lead/feed screw is intended to allow you to move the tool by a precise amount so I would measure that. I would compare the actual distances moved to the distance that the dial on the screw says it has. That is a direct method of measuring the actual errors as related to the intended use of the screws.

The wear on the nut is going to show up at all positions on the screw so I would check that on the least used part of the screw. I would set the dial to a fixed reading (0) and see how much the position of the nut (carriage, cross slide, or compound) moves when pushed one way and then the other. You will need to check the axial play of the screw itself in it's bearings first and subtract that from the movement readings. So, that is a total of three sources of error: the play of the screw in it's bearings, the play in the nut on the screw, and the amount of wear (usually different at different places) on the screw itself. All three of these add together to produce the total error in the position of the nut. Of course, the constant ones can be compensated for in actual operations.

But back to what's good enough. That really depends on you, on what you are doing, how you are using the machine and the screw, and how much accuracy is needed for all of the above. If you are in the business of making high precision screws for high end lathes or milling machines, then a thread gauge is going to be a bad joke. Such precision requires the utmost in technique and precision measurements. If you are a commercial shop making parts that must interchange, a thread gauge is probably still not good enough and more accurate means would be needed. But in a home shop that is used for low quality projects, a good thread gauge, properly used, may be enough. As I said, it depends. And it is you, not me that it depends on.

-- 
E. Paul Alciatore III
Beaumont, TX
PAlciatore@...

Re: Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

bode528@...
 

I'm dealing with cleaning out my Dad's shop.  For a couple years now he has been telling me to take anything I want as he won't use it anymore.  I think he finally really is at that point.  This year has been getting tougher for him to walk and he just stopped driving.  He turns 103 in December.  My brother in law and I are slowly cleaning his shop out.  I don't need much as I don't have room and my shop is much better equiped than his.   BIL took the South Bend lathe.

My Dad is the best machinist I ever met.  His handiwork is on the moon - he made parts for the moon rovers.

I can't help thinking about what my family will have to put up with to empty my shop someday.

Re: 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts

glenn brooks
 

Couple of years ago I bought a SB Fourteen. It wouldn’t consistently hold the tooling in place while making a cut.  Sometimes up to .010” variation in diameter when turning down round stock.  Everything else about the machine was. Early perfect - minimal wear on the way, tight headstock,etc.

I replace the cross feed screw and nut, and replaced the thrust bearings holding the end of cross feed crossfeed screw. Now it holds tolerance like a new machine.  The screw and nut were badly worn, causing the tooling to wander randomly in and out of the cutting surface of the work piece. Also the tooling left a series of concentric grooves in the surface, usually about 1” apart.  Big tip off...

BTW, the nut wears out just like the threads on the screw. 

Glenn 


On Oct 2, 2018, at 8:55 AM, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:

Paul mentioned looking at the screw to see wear.

This is viable.

The picture below is a milling machine cross feed screw. Its ½-10 Acme. Yours is 7/16-10 Acme

<image003.jpg>

 

The screw on the top is badly worn. You can see the difference between the right and left sides. Right side is more in the middle of the travel.

In this case the Nut was also worn. It was a weirdly shaped nut and difficult to make.

I made a new screw (bottom), which accounted for the nut play. Note that the lands and groves are not symmetrical.

 

Jim B.

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com

--
Jim B

Re: 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts

Jim_B
 

Paul mentioned looking at the screw to see wear.

This is viable.

The picture below is a milling machine cross feed screw. Its ½-10 Acme. Yours is 7/16-10 Acme

 

The screw on the top is badly worn. You can see the difference between the right and left sides. Right side is more in the middle of the travel.

In this case the Nut was also worn. It was a weirdly shaped nut and difficult to make.

I made a new screw (bottom), which accounted for the nut play. Note that the lands and groves are not symmetrical.

 

Jim B.

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com

--
Jim B

Re: 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts

Jim_B
 

Allen is correct.

In my experience about half or more of the axial play in either the cross or compound screw arrives from wear on the bearing surfaces.

Here is a way to test and measure that paly.

 

The picture is a Heavy 10 compound but the procedure is the same for a 9” workshop cross feed.

There needs to be about 0.001” of play there but not much more.

 

If you find excessive play, remove the screw.

If you need instructions on that please post.

 

In the next picture I will show what to do.

You do need to write down exactly how much play you measure in the above step.

 

Now below is your screw.

 

The arrows show where you need to remove material. Subtract 0.001 from the play you measured in the first step.

 

Lets say you measured 0.011 play in the first step. You want to remove 0.001 from this step.

 

 

I used a shop ground very pointy tool to cut and a shop made, way mounted, dial indicator to measure how much.

 

Any questions just ask.

 

There used to be a post on the Yahoo site showing this and more BUT I can’t find it here. It was 59015. But that number does not work on this new site.

 

 

Oh, BTW in the files section you should find a conversion that inserts ball/roller bearings in the assembly to completely eliminate this problem and remove the extra 0.001” of play.

 

Jim B.

 

-----Original Message-----
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of m. allan noah
Sent: Tuesday, October 02, 2018 9:50 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts

 

There are two sources of wear in any leadscrew- the screw to nut interface, and the bearing surfaces for the rotating component (in this case, the screw). In my experience, SB's tend to have more wear in the bearings that the thread. As you shove the slide back and forth, do you see a gap open up behind the dial on the screw?

 

allan

On Tue, Oct 2, 2018 at 9:04 AM Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:

> A pitch gage wont do a thing for you checking the wear of the thread

> GP

> On Tuesday, October 2, 2018 12:14 AM, Sam <i.am.sam.sam.i.am2008@...> wrote:

> The wear is most likely in the middle.

> Take it out and compare the middle to the extreme ends.

> On Mon, Oct 1, 2018 at 9:56 PM carbure2003 <guycad@...> wrote:

> CHeck your wear with 3 wire method.

> Formulaes can be found in machinery handbook and on internet.

> You basically need 3 rods with same diameter that fit approximately at the pitch diameter.

> I used the method when I cut my replacement screws and got a small backlash.


Virus-free. www.avast.com

--
Jim B

Re: 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts

m. allan noah
 

There are two sources of wear in any leadscrew- the screw to nut
interface, and the bearing surfaces for the rotating component (in
this case, the screw). In my experience, SB's tend to have more wear
in the bearings that the thread. As you shove the slide back and
forth, do you see a gap open up behind the dial on the screw?

allan

On Tue, Oct 2, 2018 at 9:04 AM Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:

A pitch gage wont do a thing for you checking the wear of the thread
GP


On Tuesday, October 2, 2018 12:14 AM, Sam <i.am.sam.sam.i.am2008@...> wrote:


The wear is most likely in the middle.

Take it out and compare the middle to the extreme ends.



On Mon, Oct 1, 2018 at 9:56 PM carbure2003 <guycad@...> wrote:

CHeck your wear with 3 wire method.

Formulaes can be found in machinery handbook and on internet.

You basically need 3 rods with same diameter that fit approximately at the pitch diameter.

I used the method when I cut my replacement screws and got a small backlash.



---------- Original Message ----------
From: "mike allen" <animal@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts
Date: Mon, 1 Oct 2018 18:07:53 -0700

howdy folks , it's finally time to address the play/slop in my
compound & crossfeed's . is a acme thread pitch gauge accurate enough to
check the screws with , not really sure how much the screw's wear with
the brass nut's

but will buy a pitch gauge if it's accurate enough . I plan to
replace the nuts anyways . if I can see if the screws are still good I
can put that money in the steady rest /taper attachment kitty

tks

animal




____________________________________________________________
Unbelievable German World War 2 Photo Shocks Americans
pro.healthresponses.org
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5bb2d00f5648e500e76b4st01vuc





--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"

Re: 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts

Guenther Paul
 

A pitch gage wont do a thing for you checking the wear of the thread 
GP


On Tuesday, October 2, 2018 12:14 AM, Sam <i.am.sam.sam.i.am2008@...> wrote:


The wear is most likely in the middle. 

Take it out and compare the middle to the extreme ends.



On Mon, Oct 1, 2018 at 9:56 PM carbure2003 <guycad@...> wrote:
CHeck your wear with 3 wire method.

Formulaes can be found in machinery handbook and on internet.

You basically need 3 rods with same diameter that fit approximately at the pitch diameter.

I used the method when I cut my replacement screws and got a small backlash.



---------- Original Message ----------
From: "mike allen" <animal@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts
Date: Mon, 1 Oct 2018 18:07:53 -0700

         howdy folks , it's finally time to address the play/slop in my
compound & crossfeed's . is a acme thread pitch gauge accurate enough to
check the screws with , not really sure  how much the screw's wear with
the brass nut's

         but will buy a pitch gauge if it's accurate enough . I plan to
replace the nuts anyways . if I can see if the screws are still good I
can put that money in the steady rest  /taper attachment kitty

         tks

          animal




____________________________________________________________
Unbelievable German World War 2 Photo Shocks Americans
pro.healthresponses.org
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5bb2d00f5648e500e76b4st01vuc





Re: 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts

Sam
 

The wear is most likely in the middle. 

Take it out and compare the middle to the extreme ends.



On Mon, Oct 1, 2018 at 9:56 PM carbure2003 <guycad@...> wrote:
CHeck your wear with 3 wire method.

Formulaes can be found in machinery handbook and on internet.

You basically need 3 rods with same diameter that fit approximately at the pitch diameter.

I used the method when I cut my replacement screws and got a small backlash.



---------- Original Message ----------
From: "mike allen" <animal@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts
Date: Mon, 1 Oct 2018 18:07:53 -0700

         howdy folks , it's finally time to address the play/slop in my
compound & crossfeed's . is a acme thread pitch gauge accurate enough to
check the screws with , not really sure  how much the screw's wear with
the brass nut's

         but will buy a pitch gauge if it's accurate enough . I plan to
replace the nuts anyways . if I can see if the screws are still good I
can put that money in the steady rest  /taper attachment kitty

         tks

          animal




____________________________________________________________
Unbelievable German World War 2 Photo Shocks Americans
pro.healthresponses.org
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5bb2d00f5648e500e76b4st01vuc



Re: 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts

carbure2003
 

CHeck your wear with 3 wire method.

Formulaes can be found in machinery handbook and on internet.

You basically need 3 rods with same diameter that fit approximately at the pitch diameter.

I used the method when I cut my replacement screws and got a small backlash.

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "mike allen" <animal@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts
Date: Mon, 1 Oct 2018 18:07:53 -0700

        howdy folks , it's finally time to address the play/slop in my
compound & crossfeed's . is a acme thread pitch gauge accurate enough to
check the screws with , not really sure  how much the screw's wear with
the brass nut's

        but will buy a pitch gauge if it's accurate enough . I plan to
replace the nuts anyways . if I can see if the screws are still good I
can put that money in the steady rest  /taper attachment kitty

        tks

         animal




____________________________________________________________
Unbelievable German World War 2 Photo Shocks Americans
pro.healthresponses.org
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5bb2d00f5648e500e76b4st01vuc

9A Compound& Crossfeed Screws & Nuts

mike allen
 

howdy folks , it's finally time to address the play/slop in my compound & crossfeed's . is a acme thread pitch gauge accurate enough to check the screws with , not really sure  how much the screw's wear with the brass nut's

        but will buy a pitch gauge if it's accurate enough . I plan to replace the nuts anyways . if I can see if the screws are still good I can put that money in the steady rest  /taper attachment kitty

        tks

         animal

Re: Chucks

John O'Connell
 

This is the only place I ever found for replacement jaws.  I have not used them ... yet.

Re: Chucks

Jim_B
 

Backplate is sized by spindle threads and chuck diameter. That’s if the backplate is already threaded. If not you cut your own threads. 
Most are rough and oversized. 
They need to be turned to be true to YOUR spindle and carefully sized to your chuck. 

It’s unlikely you will find jaws. 
They must match your make and model. 
Best to get a new chuck. 



-8
Jim B,

On Sep 26, 2018, at 7:42 AM, Brian Geffre <brian.geffre@...> wrote:

Nubee question. How do I determine which backer plate I need?  
Second question. I have a 6 inch union chuck with no jaws. Can I get any set of jaws to fit or do I have to find a union set?  
Thanks everyone. 

--
Jim B

Chucks

Brian Geffre
 

Nubee question. How do I determine which backer plate I need?  
Second question. I have a 6 inch union chuck with no jaws. Can I get any set of jaws to fit or do I have to find a union set?  
Thanks everyone. 

Re: Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

Bill Williams
 

My $0.02;  one option for rehoming vintage machinery would be to see if there are any "Makerspace" or "Hackerspace" in the area.
 
I am a member of a Makerspace in Milwaukee WI.  www.makerspace.org  We have one of the better tooled machined metal shops with about half loaned machines and half purchased. 
 
Some makerspaces have not for profit status and can trade tax documentation for equipment donations.  You could train a couple of gererations on how to use and care for the equipment if you wish.  This is one way good machines can be used and not scrapped.
 
Bill
 
---
New Outlook Express and Windows Live Mail replacement - get it here:
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Rogan Creswick <creswick@...>
Sent: 9/22/2018 11:30:41 AM
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

I'm hopeful that I'll be able to set up a shared work space / mid-century tool museum someday, turning my shop into something longer-lived.  It's probably unlikely, but there aren't many places like that out here (Pacific NW) -- we don't seem to have the machine density of the mid-west, at least, and I think there's a market for a small machinist / blacksmith / casting museum, even if it only covers it's own costs :)

Many of these tools have really interesting history that most folks don't know about (the impact of the wars on tool development and design is the most obvious bit that comes to mind).

I hopefully have 30-40 years to make this happen, so I don't think it's too ambitious, but I would be interested in the thoughts of folks on this forum.

--Rogan

On Sat, Sep 22, 2018, 9:03 AM Kerwyn Dobbs <k.dandobbs@...> wrote:
Yeah glad it worked out for you. I stood quiet in my shop one day and realized that I don’t get to keep any of this stuff. I get I have it for just a little while. 



On Sep 22, 2018, at 12:03 PM, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:

I am at that point.

I found a single buyer who got my 9” workshop and my #4 Burke mill, along with most of the tooling, collets, vices, chucks, index head etc.

I got an OK price. I might have done a lot better on eBay or CL but I am satisfied.

I still have My Heavy 10, but I think that will go to my son.  He also got my bandsaw(s), and the 10” cabinet saw.   

My daughter got all my welding stuff.

I hope by next summer we will have sold the house and moved into a condo or apartment.

 

 

Jim B.

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of david pennington via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, September 22, 2018 9:01 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

 

At some point we all will.

 

-------- Original message --------

From: "John Gallo via Groups.Io" <johnnyblock1@...>

Date: 9/21/18 20:08 (GMT-06:00)

Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

 

Bless you brother. How many of us share the same story?


Virus-free. www.avast.com

--
Jim B

Re: Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

Rogan Creswick
 

I'm hopeful that I'll be able to set up a shared work space / mid-century tool museum someday, turning my shop into something longer-lived.  It's probably unlikely, but there aren't many places like that out here (Pacific NW) -- we don't seem to have the machine density of the mid-west, at least, and I think there's a market for a small machinist / blacksmith / casting museum, even if it only covers it's own costs :)

Many of these tools have really interesting history that most folks don't know about (the impact of the wars on tool development and design is the most obvious bit that comes to mind).

I hopefully have 30-40 years to make this happen, so I don't think it's too ambitious, but I would be interested in the thoughts of folks on this forum.

--Rogan


On Sat, Sep 22, 2018, 9:03 AM Kerwyn Dobbs <k.dandobbs@...> wrote:
Yeah glad it worked out for you. I stood quiet in my shop one day and realized that I don’t get to keep any of this stuff. I get I have it for just a little while. 



On Sep 22, 2018, at 12:03 PM, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:

I am at that point.

I found a single buyer who got my 9” workshop and my #4 Burke mill, along with most of the tooling, collets, vices, chucks, index head etc.

I got an OK price. I might have done a lot better on eBay or CL but I am satisfied.

I still have My Heavy 10, but I think that will go to my son.  He also got my bandsaw(s), and the 10” cabinet saw.   

My daughter got all my welding stuff.

I hope by next summer we will have sold the house and moved into a condo or apartment.

 

 

Jim B.

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of david pennington via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, September 22, 2018 9:01 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

 

At some point we all will.

 

-------- Original message --------

From: "John Gallo via Groups.Io" <johnnyblock1@...>

Date: 9/21/18 20:08 (GMT-06:00)

Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

 

Bless you brother. How many of us share the same story?


Virus-free. www.avast.com

--
Jim B

Re: Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

Kerwyn Dobbs
 

Yeah glad it worked out for you. I stood quiet in my shop one day and realized that I don’t get to keep any of this stuff. I get I have it for just a little while. 


On Sep 22, 2018, at 12:03 PM, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:

I am at that point.

I found a single buyer who got my 9” workshop and my #4 Burke mill, along with most of the tooling, collets, vices, chucks, index head etc.

I got an OK price. I might have done a lot better on eBay or CL but I am satisfied.

I still have My Heavy 10, but I think that will go to my son.  He also got my bandsaw(s), and the 10” cabinet saw.   

My daughter got all my welding stuff.

I hope by next summer we will have sold the house and moved into a condo or apartment.

 

 

Jim B.

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of david pennington via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, September 22, 2018 9:01 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

 

At some point we all will.

 

-------- Original message --------

From: "John Gallo via Groups.Io" <johnnyblock1@...>

Date: 9/21/18 20:08 (GMT-06:00)

Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

 

Bless you brother. How many of us share the same story?


Virus-free. www.avast.com

--
Jim B

Re: Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

Jim_B
 

I am at that point.

I found a single buyer who got my 9” workshop and my #4 Burke mill, along with most of the tooling, collets, vices, chucks, index head etc.

I got an OK price. I might have done a lot better on eBay or CL but I am satisfied.

I still have My Heavy 10, but I think that will go to my son.  He also got my bandsaw(s), and the 10” cabinet saw.   

My daughter got all my welding stuff.

I hope by next summer we will have sold the house and moved into a condo or apartment.

 

 

Jim B.

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of david pennington via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, September 22, 2018 9:01 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

 

At some point we all will.

 

-------- Original message --------

From: "John Gallo via Groups.Io" <johnnyblock1@...>

Date: 9/21/18 20:08 (GMT-06:00)

Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

 

Bless you brother. How many of us share the same story?


Virus-free. www.avast.com

--
Jim B

Re: Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

david pennington
 

At some point we all will.

-------- Original message --------
From: "John Gallo via Groups.Io" <johnnyblock1@...>
Date: 9/21/18 20:08 (GMT-06:00)
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Best way to sell an entire hobby machine shop?

Bless you brother. How many of us share the same story?