Date   

Re: modern motor for SB9

Guenther Paul
 

A reversing motor is a must on a lathe 
GP


On Monday, May 28, 2018 11:21 AM, G Confer <gconfer@...> wrote:


I did the StateCollage crosslide about 20 years ago and do not remember much about the machining process. I do remember it took quite a bit of time. At first I was thinking I did it on my South Bend 9” but I had just retired and took a lathe course at Clark Co. Comm. College machining school and they introduced me to milling machines and I may have used theirs. I liked the milling machines and founded a Clausing 8520, bought it and may have used it to finish the cross slide.

I found it to be hard to use and since I had the Clausing did not use it too much. I have used it to mount it the tool post to the rear for parting. It was a great learning process. Gary



Re: modern motor for SB9

G Confer
 

I did the StateCollage crosslide about 20 years ago and do not remember much about the machining process. I do remember it took quite a bit of time. At first I was thinking I did it on my South Bend 9” but I had just retired and took a lathe course at Clark Co. Comm. College machining school and they introduced me to milling machines and I may have used theirs. I liked the milling machines and founded a Clausing 8520, bought it and may have used it to finish the cross slide.

I found it to be hard to use and since I had the Clausing did not use it too much. I have used it to mount it the tool post to the rear for parting. It was a great learning process. Gary


Re: ADV: Re: [SouthBendLathe] StateCollage Crosslide

Flash Gordon
 

A lot of machining. Surface the whole thing, mills the slots, drill and mill the hole for the tool holder and more. I used an a very large vertical mill at school. Took many days. There is a step by step instruction with pictures that I followed. I can look up the site if anyone is interested.

Ed S

On 5/27/2018 10:16 PM, mike allen wrote:
that's kinda what I was thinkin , I only have a Mill/Drill & I don't think I have the travel . may have to call in a favor somewhere

        animal



On 5/27/2018 7:10 PM, Jim_B wrote:
I always wanted one. I had a Burke #4 mill. It had a table travel of 9”.
You need 12 or more.
You need to mill the V groves for the ways and mill the top surface and size the bore for the top slide.
Not trivial.
Need something like a Bridgeport.

Sent from my iPhone-8
Jim B,

On May 27, 2018, at 10:00 PM, mike allen <animal@psln.com> wrote:

         has anyone gotten 1 of the cross slide casting kits from StateCollage?  How much machining was required?

http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/S-4382.html

         tks

         animal








Re: StateCollage Crosslide

Flash Gordon
 

I have a state college cross slide for sale that is 95% complete. Needs the side lock holes drilled and tapped.

Ed S

On 5/27/2018 10:10 PM, Jim_B wrote:
I always wanted one. I had a Burke #4 mill. It had a table travel of 9”.
You need 12 or more.
You need to mill the V groves for the ways and mill the top surface and size the bore for the top slide.
Not trivial.
Need something like a Bridgeport.

Sent from my iPhone-8
Jim B,

On May 27, 2018, at 10:00 PM, mike allen <animal@psln.com> wrote:

has anyone gotten 1 of the cross slide casting kits from StateCollage? How much machining was required?

http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/S-4382.html

tks

animal






Re: modern motor for SB9

Dave Eggebraaten (AF5IA)
 

A helpful feature is a reversing capability.


Re: StateCollage Crosslide

jdunbar_4
 

I have one, it was a great project and nice add to the lathe. It is a rough casting and requires squaring it up, cutting the dovetails, tslots, boring the hole for the compound slide and drill/tapping the set screws.


Thanks

John

On May 27, 2018, at 10:00 PM, mike allen <animal@psln.com> wrote:

has anyone gotten 1 of the cross slide casting kits from StateCollage? How much machining was required?

http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/S-4382.html

tks

animal






Skiving a belt Re: [SouthBendLathe] Drive belt queston

Gregg Eshelman
 

It's pretty easy to skive a leather belt. You need a couple of boards, a pair of small bar clamps, something solid to clamp to, a pen, and a small block plane.

1. Decide how much overlap you want in the join. Overlap the ends that much and mark the TOP of one end and the BOTTOM of the other end.
2. Align one end of the belt, mark up, with the end of one of the boards. The belt end has to be at the board end to allow the plane to angle down past it so it can cut the belt nearly paper thin.
3. Set the block plane atop the belt with its blade edge resting on the pen mark.
4. Set the second board with an end up against the back end of the plane then clamp boards and belt to your bench, table etc.

You want that plane SHARP. With this setup you can't cut too deep at the end of the skive angle. Plane the leather until you have a straight taper down to very thin at the end of the belt. Repeat the setup with the other end, remembering to flip the belt over to do the opposite side.

Gorilla glue works great for sticking it together. There are fancy belt gluing jigs but a couple of pieces of waxed angle iron and a pair of bar clamps work. Just make sure to not let the join get crooked as you tighten the clamps. Get the cut surfaces a little damp then evenly spread a THIN LAYER of glue on both ends. Ideally there should be very little squeeze out. Let cure for 24 hours.

The polyurethane gorilla glue stays flexible and rolls smoothly around the pulleys.

Dunno if this will work with a serpentine automotive belt or other materials. Depends on how well it takes to being shaved in thin layers and what glue will bond and remain flexible.

On Sunday, May 27, 2018, 11:27:38 AM MDT, Dave Robbins <dmrobbin@...> wrote:


I saw where you can get them prepared like that on ebay but they're expensive
I think given that it's not much more trouble in my situation to measure, disassemble, get belt and reassemble, I'll skip the cut/glue option
When I put the spindle in to measure I don't have to put it all the way in, just enough so it's held straight

On Sun, May 27, 2018 at 12:05 PM, Roger Bickers via Groups.Io <mr.concrete1964@...> wrote:
Why not cut the belt (skieve) and glue it together and clamp it till the glue sits?


Re: Drive belt queston

Gregg Eshelman
 

There are places that will make you any width of multi-rib belt, in a huge variety of lengths. I got a custom one made for my still unfinished JET 9x20 CNC conversion. The belt material is made in long tubes, in a range of diameters. They just slice off however many ribs you want.

For the 1914 Sears Expert I found a place that listed belts by length and width, in addition to rib profile and common applications. Most places typically only list belts by application so you've no idea of dimensions. Turned out that a steering pump belt for a White/Volvo semi tractor was what I got.

But it's been long enough ago I don't remember the names of the companies. :P But they're out there, keep looking.

At least with a serpentine belt there is no need to ever relax tension when not in use because they're made to withstand constant and much higher tension and speeds than they'll get in lathe use. The only reason you might want to let off tension is with plain bearings to let oil flow between the side of the bearings and spindle before starting.

On Sunday, May 27, 2018, 8:46:31 AM MDT, Dave Robbins <dmrobbin@...> wrote:


My lathe is currently in pieces on a bench so to use a serpentine belt I'll have to put everything together (which I have to do anyway) measure the required length, get the belt, take the head-stock back apart to install and then be done.
This is really not all that much trouble since to measure the belt length I don't really need to completely assemble the head-stock.
I'm just thinking through the options
I like the idea of the serpentine belt, since it's already apart, I think I'll do the little extra work to go that route
Thanks for all the info and particularly some of the photos


Re: StateCollage Crosslide

Ray De Jong
 

I did mine on a, you might say Rong Foo 45. The dovetails were quite straight forward but did take time. The top and T-slots were done in one setup after very intensive 'square checking' and only after the dovetails were complete. Its a bit of a challenge but what a lovely edition to the '9'. I no longer have the SB9 nor the Chinese Mill. but am working toward a new shop and hope to do another S-4382 for the 10K I am presently refurbishing

On Sunday, May 27, 2018, 7:10:54 PM PDT, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


I always wanted one. I had a Burke #4 mill. It had a table travel of 9”.
You need 12 or more.
You need to mill the V groves for the ways and mill the top surface and size the bore for the top slide.
Not trivial.
Need something like a Bridgeport.

-8
Jim B,

> On May 27, 2018, at 10:00 PM, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:
>
>        has anyone gotten 1 of the cross slide casting kits from StateCollage?  How much machining was required?
>
>        http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/S-4382.html
>
>        tks
>
>        animal
>
>
>
>
>
>



--
Jim B



Re: Drive belt queston

Phillip Rankin
 

Fake news


On Sun, May 27, 2018, 8:13 PM armne@... <armne@...> wrote:
  I hear if the serpentine belt gets oils its all over ?
Alec Ryals


Re: ADV: Re: [SouthBendLathe] StateCollage Crosslide

mike allen
 

that's kinda what I was thinkin , I only have a Mill/Drill & I don't think I have the travel . may have to call in a favor somewhere

        animal

On 5/27/2018 7:10 PM, Jim_B wrote:
I always wanted one. I had a Burke #4 mill. It had a table travel of 9”.
You need 12 or more.
You need to mill the V groves for the ways and mill the top surface and size the bore for the top slide.
Not trivial.
Need something like a Bridgeport.

Sent from my iPhone-8
Jim B,

On May 27, 2018, at 10:00 PM, mike allen <animal@psln.com> wrote:

has anyone gotten 1 of the cross slide casting kits from StateCollage? How much machining was required?

http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/S-4382.html

tks

animal






Re: StateCollage Crosslide

Jim_B
 

I always wanted one. I had a Burke #4 mill. It had a table travel of 9”.
You need 12 or more.
You need to mill the V groves for the ways and mill the top surface and size the bore for the top slide.
Not trivial.
Need something like a Bridgeport.

Sent from my iPhone-8
Jim B,

On May 27, 2018, at 10:00 PM, mike allen <animal@psln.com> wrote:

has anyone gotten 1 of the cross slide casting kits from StateCollage? How much machining was required?

http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/S-4382.html

tks

animal





--
Jim B


StateCollage Crosslide

mike allen
 

has anyone gotten 1 of the cross slide casting kits from StateCollage?  How much machining was required?

        http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/S-4382.html

        tks

        animal


Re: Drive belt queston

armne@sbcglobal.net <armne@...>
 

  I hear if the serpentine belt gets oils its all over ?
Alec Ryals


Re: modern motor for SB9

oscar kern <kernbigo@...>
 


Go with a treadmill  mill instead, I did with no regrets 

On Sun, May 27, 2018 at 5:06 PM, Dave Robbins
<dmrobbin@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi Folks,

I've been rebuilding an SB9A for the last several months (or more)
When I first started the project I found this group and somebody mentioned they sell modern electric motors on ebay to replace the original
Can anyone come up with a link to that?

Thanks
Dave


Re: modern motor for SB9

Dave Robbins
 

you guys are a wealth of info
thanks


Re: modern motor for SB9

Oren
 

Make sure you don’t get a high  starting torque motor...they are prevalent on Craigslist because they’re used a lot on compressors, which tend to wear out before the compressor motors. They are designed to start under a load and will make your lathe jump each time you switch it on since your lathe is unloaded. You want a regular capacitor start motor. Farm duty is fine, 56 frame will probably work but you may have to drill two or perhaps all four holes. The shaft may be shorter on your new 56 frame motor requiring you to move it to the left in order to keep it aligned with the drive pulley.
The frame size on my original motor is no longer made and there is no cross reference....but 56 is close.


On May 27, 2018, at 5:03 PM, Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:

Some people use treadmill motors 
GP


On Sunday, May 27, 2018 8:00 PM, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


Welcome

On Sun, May 27, 2018, 6:52 PM Dave Robbins <dmrobbin@...> wrote:
Thanks Phillip,

I think that's the info I was looking for



Re: modern motor for SB9

Guenther Paul
 

Some people use treadmill motors 
GP


On Sunday, May 27, 2018 8:00 PM, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


Welcome

On Sun, May 27, 2018, 6:52 PM Dave Robbins <dmrobbin@...> wrote:
Thanks Phillip,

I think that's the info I was looking for



Re: modern motor for SB9

Phillip Rankin
 

Welcome


On Sun, May 27, 2018, 6:52 PM Dave Robbins <dmrobbin@...> wrote:
Thanks Phillip,

I think that's the info I was looking for


Re: modern motor for SB9

Dave Robbins
 

Thanks Phillip,

I think that's the info I was looking for

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