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Re: Clausing 5914 Bent Spindle Question (w/ Video)

Ryan K
 

So sorry guys!  This was meant to be posted in the Clausing Group.  Sorry about that!  However, I know there are a lot of very smart guys in here so I'd appreciate any ideas.  Thank you!


Clausing 5914 Bent Spindle Question (w/ Video)

Ryan K
 

I picked up a Clausing 5914 two days ago from a local machinist/fabricator.  Everything about the machine looked great except I wasn't able to inspect the spindle (mistake #1) because the collar was seized up pretty good around the 3-jaw chuck.  It measured ~.006" runout so I figured the spindle was good and I looked into the bore and inspected the taper to confirm they were free from damage.  I figured I was in the clear.  Turns out, I was not.

When I got home I was able to break the collar free and remove the chuck.  I put an indicator to the spindle and to my horror found that it had .0015" runout.  

The spindle is bent.  I'm almost 100% sure it happened by the transportation method employed by the previous owner.  When my friend I returned with some plywood and dollies we found the original owner had already moved the lathe 20 feet or so.  He put a solid piece of steel through the chuck, wrapped a chain around that and hoisted the machine in the air by the spindle.   We expressed concern but he said he'd been doing it that way for 40 years and has never had a problem.  We didn't argue the point since he was so much more experienced and had moved dozens of machines (mistake 2)

Do you guys have any ideas to try and repair it?

Worst case scenario I suppose is that I purchase a new backplate and face/turn it, then mount a chuck to it.  Since the spindle is keyed it will always register to the same location.  Hate the idea of loosing the ability to use 5C collets with the machine (I have the drawbar/adapter) and not being able to use the original 1-piece 4-jaw chuck, but I just don't know how else to approach it. 

Any input welcome!  Thank you guys!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaoUv4drTZ8
 


Re: collet adapter 14 1/2"

John M
 

4C is correct
--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 3/2/18, jfriend314@gmail.com [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: collet adapter 14 1/2"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, March 2, 2018, 9:20 PM


 









Cuda, what collets do you have or intend to use???
The SB tooling drawing says a 14 1/2" lathe takes
3/4" collet.
The
small bore SB 13" takes an 11/16" collet which is
the 2-A (not the body diameter but the largest diameter the
collet will hold).
3/4" collet was probably
4C.
John









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Re: collet adapter 14 1/2"

comstock_friend
 

Cuda, what collets do you have or intend to use??? The SB tooling drawing says a 14 1/2" lathe takes 3/4" collet.

The small bore SB 13" takes an 11/16" collet which is the 2-A (not the body diameter but the largest diameter the collet will hold).

3/4" collet was probably 4C.

John


Re: collet adapter 14 1/2"

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

None spare, but if you are anywhere near Ripley, Derbyshire, UK, you would be welcome to come & measure up to make a copy.

Eddie



From: "cudaboy66@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Friday, 2 March 2018, 1:57
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] collet adapter 14 1/2"

 
Anyone have one laying around for a 14 1/2" with the small bore




collet adapter 14 1/2"

John M
 

Anyone have one laying around for a 14 1/2" with the small bore



Re: Taper attachment

sblatheman
 

Send me an email:

On Mar 1, 2018, at 5:41 PM, 913fred@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

I am trying to reach Latheman2...

913fred@everestkc,.net


Re: Taper attachment

Jim_B
 

On Mar 1, 2018, at 5:41 PM, 913fred@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

I am trying to reach Latheman2...

913fred@everestkc,.net


Re: Taper attachment

fwhite913
 

I am trying to reach Latheman2...

913fred@everestkc,.net


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SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
 

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Re: Metric threading

m. allan noah
 

Only if you care about 1/8 inch in a mile. :)

allan

On Wed, Feb 28, 2018 at 5:14 PM, john kling jkling222@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

If the change to a new standard was greater in the UK,  is a different set of metric transposition change gears needed for very old imperial lathes?




--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: Metric threading

john kling
 

If the change to a new standard was greater in the UK,  is a different set of metric transposition change gears needed for very old imperial lathes?


Re: Metric threading

David Beierl
 

I take it that the now internationally accepted is close to the post 1900 standard. This I take it means that those with lathes made in the early 1900 will not (from this) have trouble cutting threads to the current American or imperial standards?

I believe the difference amounts to about an eighth of an inch per mile -- of interest to long-distance surveyors, but few others.

Yrs,


Re: Metric threading

john kling
 

I take it that the now internationally accepted is close to the post 1900 standard. This I take it means that those with lathes made in the early 1900 will not (from this) have trouble cutting threads to the current American or imperial standards?

On Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 10:50:36 AM EST, junkyard_kahrs@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:


 

Awesome. What a concise and detailed rundown. Not only the how- but the *why* a great 20th-century definition of standards finally settled into its final form.


Re: Metric threading

john kahrs
 

Awesome. What a concise and detailed rundown. Not only the how- but the *why* a great 20th-century definition of standards finally settled into its final form.


Re: Metric threading

Paul Alciatore
 

Why 25.4mm instead of 25.0? Well, both the inch and the meter were already established when today's standard was adopted in the 1950s and the 1960s. Both had gone through several refinements before that point and more problematic was the fact that different countries had slightly different standards, at least for the inch. When the 25.4mm factor was adopted as the exact conversion, that distance for the inch was 1.7 millionths longer than the existing imperial inch and 2 millionths shorter than the existing US inch. I believe other countries also had differences. In short, it was a compromise and, being only a three digit number, it was a very convenient one. Two parts in a million was almost a negligible difference for almost all practical purposes.

If the inch had been redefined as 25mm at that time, then that would have been a difference of almost 1.7% and that would have been noticeable on almost every ruler and other measuring device that used inches. Virtually every one of them in the world would have been instantly inaccurate and would need to be replaced. Just for one example, a one foot ruler would be off by about 3/16". Even a first grade school child would notice. The confusion in the world of engineering would be enormous.

But, as I said above, the 25.4mm figure was only off by millionths of an inch. So, a 100 foot tape measure would only be off by 0.0002". For all practical purposes every existing measuring device could be used with no worry about it's accuracy. Only the most demanding measurements in physics and astronomy would need to ever consider the differences between the old standards and the new one.

So the 25.4mm figure was a magnificently practical compromise. I was getting my degree in physics (the science of measurement) in the early 60s and there was absolutely no reason to correct for the change in any of the experiments or calculations that I did in that program. The blueprints for bridges and buildings and automobiles and everything else were just as good after the change as before. And the same measurement devices were still used with no problems.


Re: Metric threading

sblatheman
 

Send an email:

On Feb 27, 2018, at 3:00 PM, 913fred@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

Trying to reach Latheman...

Fred


Re: Metric threading

fwhite913
 

Trying to reach Latheman...

Fred


Re: Metric threading

Rick Rick
 

I use a Sherline electronic rotary table for cutting gears. One push of the button and you are at the next cut.
So very simple, but somewhat expensive solution.
Rick


Re: Metric threading

ww_big_al
 

The (international) inch has been exactly 25.4 mm since July 1959. At this point in time the (international) yard was redefined as 0.9144 metre - until this time the ratio between the US yard and the metre was different to the ratio between the UK yard and the metre. For more information, see Engineering Metrologyby K J Hume (2 ed) Macdonald London 1967. The American inch changed by 2 millionths of an inch and the UK inch by 1.7 millionths of an inch. The international inch falls mid way between the old UK and US inch.

References:

  • The Yard Unit of Length, Nature, Vol 200, No 4908 pp 730-732 23 Nov 1963
  • The United Kingdom standards of the yard in terms, of the metre (British Applied Journal of Physics)
In other word, history. 

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