Date   

1945/6 1/4 hp motor - original - disassembled

david pennington
 

Hi, Folks,

The fellow I bought my lathe from reported that the original motor did not run, so he had disassembled it with an eye to fixing it. He had mounted another motor on the lathe...and that has served me well.

I offer the "motor in a box" to whomever wants it--deal to be struck that is mutually agreeable. 

The seller was a neighbor, whom I knew to be meticulous. The small parts are in Ziploc bags. 

Pictures are available. I've attached a pic of the nameplate and oil cup.

davidwpennington@...

David

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744

Inline image


Re: Motor & Drum Switch

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

That's weird. I've just tried the link again, including refreshing, and it still shows currently unavailable etc. Could it be because I'm in the UK and the vendor is in the USA, and they won't export to us? Maybe they aren't European standards compliant or something. The pricing is certainly peculiar, to say the least, and it is in USD rather than GBP.


Myford lathes used to be supplied with virtually the identical switch made by Dewhurst. I've just checked their website. Nothing of the sort. Ebay has only second hand ones, generally for parts only.


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "wlw19958" <wlw-19958@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Friday, 22 Oct, 21 At 20:12
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Motor & Drum Switch

Hi There,

On Fri, Oct 22, 2021 at 12:50 AM, eddie.draper@... wrote:
Actually, not available new currently, and Amazon don't know when it will be back in stock. Is the manufacturer still in business?
Actually, the Amazon link shows "In Stock" and ships in 2 to 3 days.
The odd thing is that if you buy one, it is $65.76 but if you buy two,
the price jumps to $364.00 and that is $182.00 each!

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Motor & Drum Switch

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

On Fri, Oct 22, 2021 at 12:50 AM, eddie.draper@... wrote:
Actually, not available new currently, and Amazon don't know when it will be back in stock. Is the manufacturer still in business?
Actually, the Amazon link shows "In Stock" and ships in 2 to 3 days.  
The odd thing is that if you buy one, it is $65.76 but if you buy two,
the price jumps to $364.00 and that is $182.00 each!

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Motor & Drum Switch

Ondrej Krejci
 

Greetings,

Here´s the switch, same manufacturer, mostlikely, but with a plastic handle:  https://www.mcmaster.com/7065K21/ 

Enjoy,


OK

On Friday, October 22, 2021, 03:50:14 AM EDT, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:


Actually, not available new currently, and Amazon don't know when it will be back in stock. Is the manufacturer still in business?


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "harry molwitz" <harry.molwitz@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Friday, 22 Oct, 21 At 00:07
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Motor & Drum Switch


On Thu, Oct 21, 2021, 6:11 PM amriensr via groups.io <amriensr=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I thought I'd see if any nearby members needs this before posting it on the local sale sites.
I have a older U.S. made GE 3/4 hp 120v AC reverseable motor wired to a Dayton drum switch pretty much plug n play, I can demo had this on my Heavy ten until I changed over to a DC motor and power supply.
Asking $175.00. Local pickup only I'm in Queens N.Y. about 5mi's fron JFK airport.
Anthony


Re: Motor & Drum Switch

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Actually, not available new currently, and Amazon don't know when it will be back in stock. Is the manufacturer still in business?


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "harry molwitz" <harry.molwitz@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Friday, 22 Oct, 21 At 00:07
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Motor & Drum Switch


On Thu, Oct 21, 2021, 6:11 PM amriensr via groups.io <amriensr=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I thought I'd see if any nearby members needs this before posting it on the local sale sites.
I have a older U.S. made GE 3/4 hp 120v AC reverseable motor wired to a Dayton drum switch pretty much plug n play, I can demo had this on my Heavy ten until I changed over to a DC motor and power supply.
Asking $175.00. Local pickup only I'm in Queens N.Y. about 5mi's fron JFK airport.
Anthony


Re: Motor & Drum Switch

harry molwitz
 


On Thu, Oct 21, 2021, 6:11 PM amriensr via groups.io <amriensr=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I thought I'd see if any nearby members needs this before posting it on the local sale sites.
I have a older U.S. made GE 3/4 hp 120v AC reverseable motor wired to a Dayton drum switch pretty much plug n play, I can demo had this on my Heavy ten until I changed over to a DC motor and power supply.
Asking $175.00. Local pickup only I'm in Queens N.Y. about 5mi's fron JFK airport.
Anthony


Motor & Drum Switch

amriensr
 

I thought I'd see if any nearby members needs this before posting it on the local sale sites.
I have a older U.S. made GE 3/4 hp 120v AC reverseable motor wired to a Dayton drum switch pretty much plug n play, I can demo had this on my Heavy ten until I changed over to a DC motor and power supply.
Asking $175.00. Local pickup only I'm in Queens N.Y. about 5mi's fron JFK airport.
Anthony


Re: SB 9" 3C Collet Nosepiece Insert Source ?

Sam
 

Thanks Michael I will keep it in mind.


On Sun, Oct 17, 2021 at 1:01 PM engmaxx <mgillen10@...> wrote:
I have an account with McMaster Carr that will send to my door here in Newmarket, Ontario (just north of Toronto).  I am one of the lucky few that had my account set up before they changed their rule for Canada.  That said, not sure where you are in Canada but if you need something from McMaster, let me know.
 
Michael


Re: SB 9" 3C Collet Nosepiece Insert Source ?

engmaxx
 

I have an account with McMaster Carr that will send to my door here in Newmarket, Ontario (just north of Toronto).  I am one of the lucky few that had my account set up before they changed their rule for Canada.  That said, not sure where you are in Canada but if you need something from McMaster, let me know.

Michael


Re: decoding a South Bend manufacturing card

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

On Sat, Oct 16, 2021 at 09:55 AM, Bill in OKC too wrote:
It has a stoutish 3phase 220/440vac motor with no data plate now.
Well Bill, your serial card states that it left SBL with a 3/4HP single phase motor,
115 volts.  Electrics get change a lot on these lathes over the years and obviously
yours has been changed too. 

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: ISO some help

G K
 

More information attached.  A catalog cut of the SB 90 degree attachment (accessory A).

Thanks again in advance for all the assistance.  A great weekend to all!

Greg

On Friday, October 15, 2021, 09:53:55 AM CDT, G K <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:


My bad, I inadvertently replied only to the previous poster.  Now for everyone's perusal:

I have, what I think is a SB 30mm to 3C collet adapter for a South Bend mill, 90 degree attachment.  I know that a 3C collet seats nicely in the adapter, and it also has the SB set screw pockets.  It came with a short draw tube.  No threads anywhere on the piece but there is a dimple inside to keep the collet aligned.  I would like to verify that it is indeed what I think it is, and have an idea of a reasonable price to sell it for.  I've attached a photo, and could provide additional photos and measurements if needed.

Any help would be appreciated,

Thanks,

Greg.


On Thursday, October 14, 2021, 03:30:15 PM CDT, Daughty <route66330@...> wrote:


What are you wanting to know about it?

On Thu, Oct 14, 2021, 3:28 PM G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hey Guys,

Can someone who has a South Bend mill with a 90 degree milling head (Item A in the attachment) drop me a line.  I have a few questions concerning a collet holder for that unit.  I see it in a catalog, but cannot figure out a few details concerning it.

Thanks,

Greg


Re: SB 9" 3C Collet Nosepiece Insert Source ?

Bill in OKC too
 

You guys have to have someplace up there you can buy such things from, but you could also make your own if you can do internal threading. That is a skill I don't have yet, myself, but I'm supposed to be learning in here in the next few weeks. 

Grainger has them in plain steel for $12.35. maybe they'll ship. Or if you're desperate, I could pick one up and send it to you. Though I think making your own is the best way. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Saturday, October 16, 2021, 10:56:16 AM CDT, Sam <i.am.sam.sam.i.am2008@...> wrote:


Yes, you're right V thread.

I'm in Canada though, McMaster Carr won't sell outside USA.
They would have to paperwork everything to prove to the gummnt  they are not selling nuclear reactors in kit form.

On Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 7:30 PM Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:
Yes, Ted. My Bad. 


Jim B,

On Oct 15, 2021, at 6:08 PM, sblatheman via groups.io <latheman2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I believe the South Bend 1 3/8 threaded spindle was 10 pitch. 
 1 3/8-10

Ted

On Oct 15, 2021, at 4:09 PM, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:

The Catalog #405 or Type 5 has a 1-3/8-8 spindle. That’s an early Workshop Lathe. 
There are people who would give an arm for that chuck.  


Jim B,

On Oct 15, 2021, at 3:55 PM, wmrmeyers@... wrote:


There are lathes with 1-3/8-8 spindles, and 1-7/8-8 spindles, too. Both would look close, but no cigar. I recent bought a (we thought) 1-1/2-8 threaded Jacobs chuck. Turns out to be 1-3/8", and no, it won't fit my 1-1/2-8 spindle. I tried! I had uses for it. Someday I'll make adapters for the various lathes here, but not this week.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.) 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Friday, October 15, 2021, 01:50:34 PM CDT, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        I have two 9" lathes different brands . Both have 1 1/2 x 8 spindles . Not all of my chucks will fit both lathes . Just tossing this out there .

        animal

On 10/15/2021 11:37 AM, Bill in OKC too via groups.io wrote:
I can't speak to your lathe, but neither of mine have ACME threads on the spindle nose. They are 60 degree V threads. I've seen people use Atlas accessories on a South Bend, and vice versa on the 1-1/2"-8TPI threads, too. Might want to look again real close. With a thread gauge in hand. Or someone may have ordered it with an ACME thread, or modified a spindle. Stranger things have happened.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)
On Friday, October 15, 2021, 01:12:41 PM CDT, Sam <i.am.sam.sam.i.am2008@...> wrote:


The spindle nose is an Acme thread.  The McMaster link shows 60 degreee V threads.


On Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 12:46 PM Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Can buy one of these, and make your own thread protector, if you like: https://www.mcmaster.com/nuts/thread-size~1-1-2-8/

Some minor modification to make it just what you want for popping the collet sleeve back out.

I've mentioned that I'm a cheap bastrich, right? You could make your own, if you can cut 1-1/2-8 internal threads yourself, too. I can't yet, Couple more lessons in class to learn that. Anyone care to guess what I'm going to be making when I'm supposed to be working on the class project? Also need one for my SB Heavy 10L, with the 2-1/4-8tpi spindle nose. I have already made stub spindles for both machines so I don't have to go to the machine to test fit stuff I make for it.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Friday, October 15, 2021, 11:25:13 AM CDT, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        these folks have one

        http://www.mymachineshop.net/product_p/10146.htm

        You will also need one of these if you don't have one to remove the adapter , though I can't say for sure this protector will work on a SB .

        http://www.mymachineshop.net/product_p/10089.htm

        animal

On 10/14/2021 5:40 AM, Sam wrote:

SB 9"  3C Collet Nosepiece Insert Source ?

 

Who sells the headstock spindle nosepiece for 3 C  collets ?


--
Jim B

--
Jim B


Re: decoding a South Bend manufacturing card

Bill in OKC too
 

It has a stoutish 3phase 220/440vac motor with no data plate now. None of the electrics are there otherwise. No idea what the motor is really rated for, just going on what Bill H said, IF I remember it right. Was going to take it to work, where we had 220/440vac 3 phase power, and cables, and my boss was thoroughly capable with motor troubleshooting. Though his preferred method of repair was " remove & replace." Worked for me, as he sent several motors home with me for practice.

Fortunately, I bought my own Megger, since the job evaporated last April, and the boss shortly after. He's not returning my calls, so I'm gonna have to figure it out on my own. I've gotten a few books on the subject, and some experience of my own from working maintenance on there for five+ years.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Saturday, October 16, 2021, 10:27:11 AM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:


Hi There, 

I think Tony's spindle is 13-23/32" (if I read that right).  That is only a 1/32" shorter
than yours.  The length is the least critical dimension.  The collet draw bar can 
easily span that difference.  Both lathes have the larger spindle (the spindle hole
is listed as 1-3/8" which is the larger spindle).

I'm curious about the electrical controls on Bill's lathe.  The card indicates that it
has a non reversible motor starter.  The "West DE-10N MTR. 10-100 Watchman
Style" doesn't imply anything to me.  If it still has the original motor and controls,
it would be interesting to know what they are and may shed light on the meaning
of the description on the serial number card.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: SB 9" 3C Collet Nosepiece Insert Source ?

Sam
 

Yes, you're right V thread.

I'm in Canada though, McMaster Carr won't sell outside USA.
They would have to paperwork everything to prove to the gummnt  they are not selling nuclear reactors in kit form.


On Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 7:30 PM Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:
Yes, Ted. My Bad. 


Jim B,

On Oct 15, 2021, at 6:08 PM, sblatheman via groups.io <latheman2=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I believe the South Bend 1 3/8 threaded spindle was 10 pitch. 
 1 3/8-10

Ted

On Oct 15, 2021, at 4:09 PM, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:

The Catalog #405 or Type 5 has a 1-3/8-8 spindle. That’s an early Workshop Lathe. 
There are people who would give an arm for that chuck.  


Jim B,

On Oct 15, 2021, at 3:55 PM, wmrmeyers@... wrote:


There are lathes with 1-3/8-8 spindles, and 1-7/8-8 spindles, too. Both would look close, but no cigar. I recent bought a (we thought) 1-1/2-8 threaded Jacobs chuck. Turns out to be 1-3/8", and no, it won't fit my 1-1/2-8 spindle. I tried! I had uses for it. Someday I'll make adapters for the various lathes here, but not this week.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.) 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Friday, October 15, 2021, 01:50:34 PM CDT, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        I have two 9" lathes different brands . Both have 1 1/2 x 8 spindles . Not all of my chucks will fit both lathes . Just tossing this out there .

        animal

On 10/15/2021 11:37 AM, Bill in OKC too via groups.io wrote:
I can't speak to your lathe, but neither of mine have ACME threads on the spindle nose. They are 60 degree V threads. I've seen people use Atlas accessories on a South Bend, and vice versa on the 1-1/2"-8TPI threads, too. Might want to look again real close. With a thread gauge in hand. Or someone may have ordered it with an ACME thread, or modified a spindle. Stranger things have happened.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)
On Friday, October 15, 2021, 01:12:41 PM CDT, Sam <i.am.sam.sam.i.am2008@...> wrote:


The spindle nose is an Acme thread.  The McMaster link shows 60 degreee V threads.


On Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 12:46 PM Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Can buy one of these, and make your own thread protector, if you like: https://www.mcmaster.com/nuts/thread-size~1-1-2-8/

Some minor modification to make it just what you want for popping the collet sleeve back out.

I've mentioned that I'm a cheap bastrich, right? You could make your own, if you can cut 1-1/2-8 internal threads yourself, too. I can't yet, Couple more lessons in class to learn that. Anyone care to guess what I'm going to be making when I'm supposed to be working on the class project? Also need one for my SB Heavy 10L, with the 2-1/4-8tpi spindle nose. I have already made stub spindles for both machines so I don't have to go to the machine to test fit stuff I make for it.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Friday, October 15, 2021, 11:25:13 AM CDT, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        these folks have one

        http://www.mymachineshop.net/product_p/10146.htm

        You will also need one of these if you don't have one to remove the adapter , though I can't say for sure this protector will work on a SB .

        http://www.mymachineshop.net/product_p/10089.htm

        animal

On 10/14/2021 5:40 AM, Sam wrote:

SB 9"  3C Collet Nosepiece Insert Source ?

 

Who sells the headstock spindle nosepiece for 3 C  collets ?


--
Jim B

--
Jim B


Re: decoding a South Bend manufacturing card

wlw19958
 

Hi There, 

I think Tony's spindle is 13-23/32" (if I read that right).  That is only a 1/32" shorter
than yours.  The length is the least critical dimension.  The collet draw bar can 
easily span that difference.  Both lathes have the larger spindle (the spindle hole
is listed as 1-3/8" which is the larger spindle).

I'm curious about the electrical controls on Bill's lathe.  The card indicates that it
has a non reversible motor starter.  The "West DE-10N MTR. 10-100 Watchman
Style" doesn't imply anything to me.  If it still has the original motor and controls,
it would be interesting to know what they are and may shed light on the meaning
of the description on the serial number card.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: decoding a South Bend manufacturing card

nzpropnut
 

Bill, I was also pleasantly surprised to see the Gosiger Tool Co is still operational - listed on my Serial Card as the original agent. I spent a bit of time on their website tonight.
Cheers, Tony





-------- Original message --------
From: "Bill in OKC too via groups.io" <wmrmeyers@...>
Date: 17/10/21 00:44 (GMT+12:00)
To: southbendlathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] decoding a South Bend manufacturing card

I've attached a copy of my serial number card, as well, so we can compare them, I note that Tony's has the same 102-5C for the DIC, as well, though his spindle is slightly different, at 13=28/32 or maybe that's a 25/32nds. It was 1941, and there was a war on. that might not have been significant at the time, though it would flunk a part in my class. ;) I do have the 2-1/4-8 spindle nose, as well.

I guess I got lucky on the parts with mine, in most ways, though I have the single tumbler gearbox, and I think Tony's is a double tumbler. The handle is broken off mine, but the broken piece is there so can be brazed back on, and I have the skills and tools to do that. I also have an apparently complete spare single tumbler gear box. I was told that Bill H hunted for a while to get the Turret tailstock, so I know it isn't original with my lathe, but it's possible most of the rest of the stuff is. Though there is that spare 5C collet closer, too. ;) I got it for $950 as is, on one of the more modern (like 1939) steel-tubing benches. It's missing two of the drawers, so one of these days I'll be venturing back into the sheet-metal working realm. Making drawers instead of armour will be something new and different for me. ;)

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Saturday, October 16, 2021, 01:18:03 AM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:


Hi There, 

After seeing Tony's Build card, I can see that the numbers (like 100,
102, etc.) I believe, do refer to the unit codes of the sub-assemblies. 
I see that the 13-3/4" is the spindle length.  Seeing the build card explains
a lot.  Also, the "N" does refer to the UMD drive assembly (but the card
does mention something about a maple top with 8 drawers substitute
for the steel top).

Reading the Build Card has been very educational.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: decoding a South Bend manufacturing card

nzpropnut
 

Bill, my machine is definitely a single tumbler machine. I have measured nearly 0.0015" wear on the ways near the headstock but I can live with that. There are no dents or dings anywhere on the ways. I have to modify the full-length chip guard on the rear to give clearance to fit the taper attachment. I took a lot of attachments off it to get the weight down for the move to our current location 4 years back. Did the move - no drama, but the house has caused a lot of drama through poor construction, so haven't yet reassembled the lathe as there may be another move coming up. We shall see.
Cheers, Tony.





-------- Original message --------
From: "Bill in OKC too via groups.io" <wmrmeyers@...>
Date: 17/10/21 00:44 (GMT+12:00)
To: southbendlathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] decoding a South Bend manufacturing card

I've attached a copy of my serial number card, as well, so we can compare them, I note that Tony's has the same 102-5C for the DIC, as well, though his spindle is slightly different, at 13=28/32 or maybe that's a 25/32nds. It was 1941, and there was a war on. that might not have been significant at the time, though it would flunk a part in my class. ;) I do have the 2-1/4-8 spindle nose, as well.

I guess I got lucky on the parts with mine, in most ways, though I have the single tumbler gearbox, and I think Tony's is a double tumbler. The handle is broken off mine, but the broken piece is there so can be brazed back on, and I have the skills and tools to do that. I also have an apparently complete spare single tumbler gear box. I was told that Bill H hunted for a while to get the Turret tailstock, so I know it isn't original with my lathe, but it's possible most of the rest of the stuff is. Though there is that spare 5C collet closer, too. ;) I got it for $950 as is, on one of the more modern (like 1939) steel-tubing benches. It's missing two of the drawers, so one of these days I'll be venturing back into the sheet-metal working realm. Making drawers instead of armour will be something new and different for me. ;)

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Saturday, October 16, 2021, 01:18:03 AM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:


Hi There, 

After seeing Tony's Build card, I can see that the numbers (like 100,
102, etc.) I believe, do refer to the unit codes of the sub-assemblies. 
I see that the 13-3/4" is the spindle length.  Seeing the build card explains
a lot.  Also, the "N" does refer to the UMD drive assembly (but the card
does mention something about a maple top with 8 drawers substitute
for the steel top).

Reading the Build Card has been very educational.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: decoding a South Bend manufacturing card

Bill in OKC too
 

I've attached a copy of my serial number card, as well, so we can compare them, I note that Tony's has the same 102-5C for the DIC, as well, though his spindle is slightly different, at 13=28/32 or maybe that's a 25/32nds. It was 1941, and there was a war on. that might not have been significant at the time, though it would flunk a part in my class. ;) I do have the 2-1/4-8 spindle nose, as well.

I guess I got lucky on the parts with mine, in most ways, though I have the single tumbler gearbox, and I think Tony's is a double tumbler. The handle is broken off mine, but the broken piece is there so can be brazed back on, and I have the skills and tools to do that. I also have an apparently complete spare single tumbler gear box. I was told that Bill H hunted for a while to get the Turret tailstock, so I know it isn't original with my lathe, but it's possible most of the rest of the stuff is. Though there is that spare 5C collet closer, too. ;) I got it for $950 as is, on one of the more modern (like 1939) steel-tubing benches. It's missing two of the drawers, so one of these days I'll be venturing back into the sheet-metal working realm. Making drawers instead of armour will be something new and different for me. ;)

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Saturday, October 16, 2021, 01:18:03 AM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:


Hi There, 

After seeing Tony's Build card, I can see that the numbers (like 100,
102, etc.) I believe, do refer to the unit codes of the sub-assemblies. 
I see that the 13-3/4" is the spindle length.  Seeing the build card explains
a lot.  Also, the "N" does refer to the UMD drive assembly (but the card
does mention something about a maple top with 8 drawers substitute
for the steel top).

Reading the Build Card has been very educational.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: decoding a South Bend manufacturing card

wlw19958
 

Hi There, 

After seeing Tony's Build card, I can see that the numbers (like 100,
102, etc.) I believe, do refer to the unit codes of the sub-assemblies. 
I see that the 13-3/4" is the spindle length.  Seeing the build card explains
a lot.  Also, the "N" does refer to the UMD drive assembly (but the card
does mention something about a maple top with 8 drawers substitute
for the steel top).

Reading the Build Card has been very educational.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: decoding a South Bend manufacturing card

nzpropnut
 

Bill, looking at your numbers made me hunt up my Serial Card again - copy attached.

 

I had always thought of mine as being a 'Pearl Harbour' period lathe, but now, on second look, I interpret the card a bit differently.

It was rec'd at the agent's warehouse - Cosiger Machinery Co, Dayton, Ohio, on 9/10/1941  (only roughly a month earlier than yours, so mine was 80 last month!)

It stayed at Cosiger for 3.25 months until it was dispatched to The Quartermaster, War Dep't Air Corp, Planehaven, California, on 12/19/1941.

Part of the problem was we read the dates the other way round down here in NZ. We go Day/Month/Year.

 

So, it must have been manufactured late August/early September 1941.

It is an 8187AN, so, also a Toolroom model, with a 4-foot bed.

 

It was just the basic machine when I purchased it, but I then spent 7 years searching E-Bay & corresponding with SB Lathe forum members and have managed to purchase all the items it would have had when originally built, including all the 5C collet gear, plus the complete metric transposing set and large-dial taper attachment & telescopic screw from Ted.

 

The gearbox was fully rebuilt by the 2nd owner (a toolmaker) before he passed.

He also incorporated a lever-action clutch into an enlarged UMD countershaft driven wheel as he screwed shafts for large building clock assemblies with it.

Just nudge it with your left elbow and everything stops!

He also built a very substantial steel cabinet to mount the lathe on.

I purchased it from his estate through a family connection.

Cheers,

Tony

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, October 16, 2021 4:06 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] decoding a South Bend manufacturing card

 

Mind interpreting mine for me? Mine is an 8187-RN 10L x 4 1/2 102 headstock 102 DIC 102-5C 100 for most everything else. 13-3/4" spindle. SP. Hole 1-3 It was sent to the Ruritan, NJ Arsenal 10/14/41, as a toolroom lathe, so 80 years ago yesterday. I got two 5C collet closers with it, and both regular and turret tailstocks, as well as a taper attachment. It lived in a leaky barn for five years after Bill Hinkle got it, and he sold it to me because he was about the same age as the lathe, and didn't think he was going to get to restore it himself. He didn't get to see me restore it, either. COVID-19 interrupted us both. Thanks for whatever you can tell me.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)

On Friday, October 15, 2021, 09:37:28 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi There,

On Fri, Oct 15, 2021 at 06:25 PM, j eric townsend wrote:

If I understand things, "RKL" means:

R -- Heavy
K -- Gearbox
L -- Spindle type? Is this the 5C for a heavy?

Your close.  The "R" was for the 10 inch (Heavy) lathe.  The
"K" is for the Quick Change Gearbox, Friction Clutch Apron
and Underneath Drive.  The "L" is for Large Spindle, Standard
Swing.

The Heavy Ten with the large spindle (a.k.a. 10L) does use 5C
Collets with the correct adapter.

According to your catalog number, 8187AB  your lathe is a "Toolroom"
version with a 4ft bed. 

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

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