Date   

Re: 13” taper attachment for sale

Steven H
 

The 13” TA that I had for sale has been sold to a fellow in Florida.

Steve Haskell
Troy, MI


Re: 13” taper attachment for sale

Steven H
 

The TA has been sold to a fellow in Florida. 


Re: 13” taper attachment for sale

plucas@...
 

I'm making cross feed screw for telescopic taper attachment on 13 sb. Do you still have taper attachment? I was wondering if I could get some measurements from you if you still have attachment?

thank you, 

Pete


Re: Broadbent Lathe

mike allen
 

Thats a pretty cool ride you got there ! Yea I have met some miners  , the ones I know do make ranchers look somewhat good . I saw a contacter on a belt one day that 
had a piece of wood screwed to the inside of the cover . WHen I asked what that was about they told me that the contactor control quit working , so they screwed the wood to the cover so when you closed the cover it pushed the contactor to make teh circuit to start teh belt up . I mentioned that it was very hoky & unsafe & was told it had been working just fine for several years . I never went back & did any work for those folks . I saw a lathe online the other day that had a 6+fraction I forgot spindle bore . I could fit the 3 jaw for my SB lathe in that spindle 
animal


Re: Broadbent Lathe

Nfwood
 

Eddie,  Great photo.  Thanks.  My grandfather ran Keck Gornerman (sp) and other old tractors including steam engines back in Illinois when I was a kid.  Still go to farm shows, esp. here in 
WV to see who is driving what.  Yep, I'm a farm kid.  Miss the old farm.

Nelson Wood, Martinsburg


-----Original Message-----
From: eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Nov 17, 2022 3:48 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Broadbent Lathe

Since we're getting some distance in the direction of off topic, I'm going to close this thread by apologising for not getting back with the headstock bore of the Broadbent. Forgot all about it till yesterday. It's about an 1/8th over 4".

I understand completely what you are saying about ranchers & maintenance. Without wishing to insult any agrarian or mineral executives, it is well known that you can take the boy out of the farm but you can't... Have you met any miners btw?

A lot of the noise of a Deutz air cooled engine is because it is air cooled. A water jacket is quite a good noise damper. Deutz (and Lister / Petter of course) are famous for 4 stroke air cooled engines aren't they? Well, please find attached a pic of my Deutz loco built in 1932, which is one of the 3 claimants of the title of oldest working Diesel loco in the UK still with original engine. Single cylinder true Diesel, 2/ crankcase scavenged, total loss lubrication, 12HP at 750 rpm, about 2 1/4 litres. Weighs about 2 1/2 tons. Top speed 5 mph, and that's in top gear. More a conversation piece than a means of transport nowadays, but it had a working life at a slate quarry in the English lake district.

Eddie





------ Original Message ------
From: "mike allen" <animal@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, 13 Nov, 22 At 18:54
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Broadbent Lathe

Thanks Edie , you must have some pretty darn stout centers for that lathe . I had a customer that had a Deutz for one of his wells . I don't remember if it was on a generator or a water pump .
If you know anything about ranchers , ( or at least the ones I have worked for ) maintenance is not in their dictionary . This unit sat in the middle of a huge valley in a pretty dusty environment.
I have no idea how old it was but the ranch hands hated it , but they kept it running with a lot of bailing wire & cussing .It was one of the louder diesels I've heard , but I'm sure the the lack of service may have played into the noise .They replaced it several years back , I think they found someone that wanted it .
That's pretty cool with the backgear on your crane . I have a old chain fall kinda like that which loop you pull on affects the speed of lift , which also reminds me a bud borrowed it quit some time ago . I need to call him & get that back .
Thanks again for the pics .
animal
On 11/12/2022 1:51 AM, eddie.draper@... via groups.io wrote:
Mike et al,

I'm not certain of the spindle bore on this one, but I'll measure it today and get back to you. I know it is less than 6", because it won't take a superheater flue for screwcutting the firebox end, which was a disappointment, but fitting the headstock centre is easier with the crane.

We didn't weigh the Peckett wheelset, but from knowledge of a comparable set of carriage or wagon wheels and express loco wheelsets, I'd guess around 1.5 tons at most.

I've taken a look at Tony's website and not found the correct picture there, so I guess I'm going to have to get in touch with him.

Deutz air cooled engines have a very high reputation for durability, so long as you keep the cooling fins and combustion air clean, and have an installation that allows plenty of airflow and segregates cold and hot from each other. The flywheel shown on the lathe is the Simplex loco one, not the standard Deutz, which is tiny by comparison and lives in a bellhousing. The Simplex loco one contains a massive single plate clutch, so the bell housing has to go, you need new engine mounts that don't need the bellhousing, and the starter has to hang out in space on an adapter plate, that was also made on the Broadbent, see attached.

The crane, incidentally, has a backgear 2 speed arrangement. With more than about 1.5 tons on the hook, you definitely need low gear, which brings a whole new meaning to "tedious". 3 operatives take it in 1 minute turns if you need to lift a big weight a long way, in the interests of speed. It was a free gift if we could get it out of the shed which it exactly fitted. Little details like that weren't going to stop me! It came from RAF Fauld, which Wikipedia knows a fair bit about, as one of its bomb dumps had a bit of a whoopsy. The sort of whoopsy that registered on seismometers in Norway.

Incidentally, I'm here because we have a SB 14.5" x 6' toolroom from October 1943, which has undetectable inaccuracy because it was refurbished by Sentinel of Shrewsbury (the steam lorry people, later Rolls Royce Diesels) in 1961, since when I don't think it has done much.

Eddie

------ Original Message ------ From: "mike allen" <animal@...> To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io Sent: Saturday, 12 Nov, 22 At 00:02 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Broadbent Lathe
Thanks for getting back . The reading I did so far gives them a pretty darn good grade . The first one on Tony's site boasted a 3.125 spindle bore . The list of what shipped with the lathe was
also impressive . We used to have a family cabin that had my grandmothers baby grand piano that came around the Cape of Horn in the early 1900's , they built 3 walls & most of the 4th
wall . Then they shoved the piano in & finished the last wall , Just like your door they came up with a solution . I imagine it may be somewhat easier to get parts for our Deutz in your neck
of the wood's then over on the Pacific side of the US . I imagine you use your RAF lift a lot in that shop . I'm working on figuring out how to put some kind of lift in my new machine room .
I had a heart attack & a triple bypass several years back , I can still lift over 100 lbs but it has to be at shoulder height to accomplish that feet . How much does the gap part weigh ? I had
a really cherry RAF 1911 Colt that I gave my oldest last year for is birthday . A very accurate pistol . That pic wit the 2 wheels & axle , how much did that puppy weigh ?
Anyone want's to read about Eddie's lathe here's a link
thanks animal
On 11/11/2022 1:55 PM, eddie.draper@... via groups.io wrote:
Mike, It isn't in Broadbent's current catalogue! 18" centre height, 10' between centres. 15 HP motor. Speed range from 7 to 235 rpm. Pure guesswork based on the S/N having a final group 1954 is that it was built in that year. Found it on ebay in Solihull an hour's drive away for less than a grand sterling in 2006. The chap driving the 10t crane lorry reckoned it weighs about 8.5 tonnes. I attach photos of it being delivered before we built the end wall of the shed (there's a roller shutter door there now), being positioned by picking up one end at a time with our 5 ton manual gantry crane made in 1938 for a RAF loco depot (!) and a job or 2 in progress. Worn & imprecise, but it works and we can live with it.
Eugene wheels are a small standard gauge Peckett built steam loco that wanted its journals turned, and the Duchess expansion link is off 46233 "Duchess of Sutherland" and wanted its trunnion bearing surfaces cleaning up. I had to take the gap piece out to do that. Boring out a dog end of axle is part of the renovation of my 2' gauge Orenstein & Koppel steam loco after I had discovered that the wheels could not be pressed off because the industrial owner had welded them on as part of building up their rear thrust faces. The new axles were made on here (each weighed about 123kg at start and came off the lathe at about 45kg due to the large thrust collars they incorporate). 4197 is repairing a flywheel to enable us to put a Deutz 4FL914 engine in a 60 HP Simplex loco in place of the original Dorman 3LB.
Cheers,
Eddie
------ Original Message ------ From: "mike allen" <animal@...> To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io Sent: Friday, 11 Nov, 22 At 19:07 Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Broadbent Lathe Eddie I just did some reading on those Broadbent lathes . Which model do you have ? They seem to be very well thought out machines . animal


Re: Broadbent Lathe

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Since we're getting some distance in the direction of off topic, I'm going to close this thread by apologising for not getting back with the headstock bore of the Broadbent. Forgot all about it till yesterday. It's about an 1/8th over 4".


I understand completely what you are saying about ranchers & maintenance. Without wishing to insult any agrarian or mineral executives, it is well known that you can take the boy out of the farm but you can't... Have you met any miners btw?


A lot of the noise of a Deutz air cooled engine is because it is air cooled. A water jacket is quite a good noise damper. Deutz (and Lister / Petter of course) are famous for 4 stroke air cooled engines aren't they? Well, please find attached a pic of my Deutz loco built in 1932, which is one of the 3 claimants of the title of oldest working Diesel loco in the UK still with original engine. Single cylinder true Diesel, 2/ crankcase scavenged, total loss lubrication, 12HP at 750 rpm, about 2 1/4 litres. Weighs about 2 1/2 tons. Top speed 5 mph, and that's in top gear. More a conversation piece than a means of transport nowadays, but it had a working life at a slate quarry in the English lake district.


Eddie






------ Original Message ------
From: "mike allen" <animal@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, 13 Nov, 22 At 18:54
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Broadbent Lathe

Thanks Edie , you must have some pretty darn stout centers for that lathe . I had a customer that had a Deutz for one of his wells . I don't remember if it was on a generator or a water pump .

If you know anything about ranchers , ( or at least the ones I have worked for ) maintenance is not in their dictionary . This unit sat in the middle of a huge valley in a pretty dusty environment.

I have no idea how old it was but the ranch hands hated it , but they kept it running with a lot of bailing wire & cussing .It was one of the louder diesels I've heard , but I'm sure the the lack of service may have played into the noise .They replaced it several years back , I think they found someone that wanted it .

That's pretty cool with the backgear on your crane . I have a old chain fall kinda like that which loop you pull on affects the speed of lift , which also reminds me a bud borrowed it quit some time ago . I need to call him & get that back .

Thanks again for the pics .

animal

On 11/12/2022 1:51 AM, eddie.draper@... via groups.io wrote:
Mike et al,


I'm not certain of the spindle bore on this one, but I'll measure it today and get back to you. I know it is less than 6", because it won't take a superheater flue for screwcutting the firebox end, which was a disappointment, but fitting the headstock centre is easier with the crane.


We didn't weigh the Peckett wheelset, but from knowledge of a comparable set of carriage or wagon wheels and express loco wheelsets, I'd guess around 1.5 tons at most.


I've taken a look at Tony's website and not found the correct picture there, so I guess I'm going to have to get in touch with him.


Deutz air cooled engines have a very high reputation for durability, so long as you keep the cooling fins and combustion air clean, and have an installation that allows plenty of airflow and segregates cold and hot from each other. The flywheel shown on the lathe is the Simplex loco one, not the standard Deutz, which is tiny by comparison and lives in a bellhousing. The Simplex loco one contains a massive single plate clutch, so the bell housing has to go, you need new engine mounts that don't need the bellhousing, and the starter has to hang out in space on an adapter plate, that was also made on the Broadbent, see attached.


The crane, incidentally, has a backgear 2 speed arrangement. With more than about 1.5 tons on the hook, you definitely need low gear, which brings a whole new meaning to "tedious". 3 operatives take it in 1 minute turns if you need to lift a big weight a long way, in the interests of speed. It was a free gift if we could get it out of the shed which it exactly fitted. Little details like that weren't going to stop me! It came from RAF Fauld, which Wikipedia knows a fair bit about, as one of its bomb dumps had a bit of a whoopsy. The sort of whoopsy that registered on seismometers in Norway.


Incidentally, I'm here because we have a SB 14.5" x 6' toolroom from October 1943, which has undetectable inaccuracy because it was refurbished by Sentinel of Shrewsbury (the steam lorry people, later Rolls Royce Diesels) in 1961, since when I don't think it has done much.


Eddie


------ Original Message ------ From: "mike allen" <animal@...> To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io Sent: Saturday, 12 Nov, 22 At 00:02 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Broadbent Lathe

Thanks for getting back . The reading I did so far gives them a pretty darn good grade . The first one on Tony's site boasted a 3.125 spindle bore . The list of what shipped with the lathe was

also impressive . We used to have a family cabin that had my grandmothers baby grand piano that came around the Cape of Horn in the early 1900's , they built 3 walls & most of the 4th

wall . Then they shoved the piano in & finished the last wall , Just like your door they came up with a solution . I imagine it may be somewhat easier to get parts for our Deutz in your neck

of the wood's then over on the Pacific side of the US . I imagine you use your RAF lift a lot in that shop . I'm working on figuring out how to put some kind of lift in my new machine room .

I had a heart attack & a triple bypass several years back , I can still lift over 100 lbs but it has to be at shoulder height to accomplish that feet . How much does the gap part weigh ? I had

a really cherry RAF 1911 Colt that I gave my oldest last year for is birthday . A very accurate pistol . That pic wit the 2 wheels & axle , how much did that puppy weigh ?

Anyone want's to read about Eddie's lathe here's a link

http://www.lathes.co.uk/broadbent/

thanks animal

On 11/11/2022 1:55 PM, eddie.draper@... via groups.io wrote:
Mike, It isn't in Broadbent's current catalogue! 18" centre height, 10' between centres. 15 HP motor. Speed range from 7 to 235 rpm. Pure guesswork based on the S/N having a final group 1954 is that it was built in that year. Found it on ebay in Solihull an hour's drive away for less than a grand sterling in 2006. The chap driving the 10t crane lorry reckoned it weighs about 8.5 tonnes. I attach photos of it being delivered before we built the end wall of the shed (there's a roller shutter door there now), being positioned by picking up one end at a time with our 5 ton manual gantry crane made in 1938 for a RAF loco depot (!) and a job or 2 in progress. Worn & imprecise, but it works and we can live with it.

Eugene wheels are a small standard gauge Peckett built steam loco that wanted its journals turned, and the Duchess expansion link is off 46233 "Duchess of Sutherland" and wanted its trunnion bearing surfaces cleaning up. I had to take the gap piece out to do that. Boring out a dog end of axle is part of the renovation of my 2' gauge Orenstein & Koppel steam loco after I had discovered that the wheels could not be pressed off because the industrial owner had welded them on as part of building up their rear thrust faces. The new axles were made on here (each weighed about 123kg at start and came off the lathe at about 45kg due to the large thrust collars they incorporate). 4197 is repairing a flywheel to enable us to put a Deutz 4FL914 engine in a 60 HP Simplex loco in place of the original Dorman 3LB.

Cheers,

Eddie

------ Original Message ------ From: "mike allen" <animal@...> To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io Sent: Friday, 11 Nov, 22 At 19:07 Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Broadbent Lathe Eddie I just did some reading on those Broadbent lathes . Which model do you have ? They seem to be very well thought out machines . animal


Re: follow up to my follow up

Rogan Creswick
 

You can kick your tailstock towards you and turn between centers to get a full-length taper (well, minus the dog) without an attachment.


On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:34 PM mike allen <animal@...> wrote:

        I seen a couple of them . I have a bud that is a full blown machinist that I plan to get the pro's & cons of the different taper attachments he has on some of his lathes . I'll also show him some

            of the tubes on them & see what he has to say about them . Seems that all the ones i see are for a short part @ 5-10 " . What if a guy wants to turn down & taper a rifle barrel . Does he do it

        5 " at a time & then re-setup ? I'm thinking that if I make one it will be the length between centers on my lathe ?

        animal

On 11/16/2022 7:06 PM, Andrei wrote:
Mike, there are several videos o people making the taper attachments. Did not seem to be overly complicated. 

PS
I am not making one for myself.... ever


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of mike allen <animal@...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2022 9:10 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
 

        I don't have a taper attachment for my lathe , but with the prices for these things these days the only way I will ever get one is

        1.  if it falls of a truck in front of my place (which is highly unlikely    since I own the road & no one can drive by my place )

        2. Someone wants to sell me one for nickels on the dollar

        3. If I make one .

        I'm guessin it will be 3  but anyways  I do have the part that bolts on to the back of the saddle , & that give me a great place to put a indicator for checkin my work & setups without getting in             the  way of anything . It would be a real easy part to make & is super helpful. .

        animal

On 11/16/2022 3:47 PM, Rogan Creswick wrote:
I wish the south bends had more flat (and machined) surfaces on the cross slide and compound for things like this.

It would be convenient to use an angle block / 1-2-3 block and run up against the chuck to set an angle like this, but there are few flat surfaces to set things against.  I imagine you could make something that slid into the toolpost mounting T-Slot and registered against the machined sides of that (they are *probably* parallel to the dovetails...)

I was considering the other night the thought of machining / fabricating a cross slide with a toolholder--no compound--in order to have more fixturing options, greater rigidity, and machined surfaces for setups like this.

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 10:13 AM mike allen <animal@...> wrote:

    I forgot to put the protractor in my last mail . set it on your chuck & the compound .

https://www.amazon.com/VOLCANOES-CLUB-Digital-Angle-Finder-Protractor/dp/B09PN8CQH7/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?gclid=Cj0KCQiAsdKbBhDHARIsANJ6-jdsmSKC5KBsU8eITCCuqNdZ25CMya_6_N4pok28hMiXVaeDRN3PRHoaAsNiEALw_wcB&hvadid=409948644601&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9032186&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=17812276858912524318&hvtargid=kwd-1126019736&hydadcr=1638_11256579&keywords=adjustable+protractor&qid=1668621961&sr=8-2-spons&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGY&psc=1

        animal

On 11/16/2022 7:33 AM, Tyler via groups.io wrote:
Allan is right, the markings are not very accurate, but you can set an angle with only one indicator:

- Set the compound at the approximate angle with the markings.

- Mount an indicator on the compound perpendicular to the work, and on center height.

- Do some math: Find the short side length of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of a known length, like 1.000", and the angle you are trying to hit, like 5 degrees.  This would be 0.0872".

- When you traverse the compound by the hypotenuse length 1.000", the indicator dial should move the length of the triangle side you calculated: 0.0872"

- Adjust the compound angle until you can hit the correct number.  This is tedious but it should get you very close.






On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:56:44 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:


The markings are never accurate enough. If the angle is critical, you make test cuts and measure the workpiece. One way is to test the fit with marking blue and a matching socket. Another way is to measure the workpiece using a pair of dial indicators (one measuring the long feed, one on the cross slide measuring the work). There are other ways, but I find them less accurate or more complex.

allan

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:42 AM E A <b-arch@...> wrote:
All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?
Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.
What am I missing?
Erik A

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
 
Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

Bill in OKC 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:


That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.


Eddie


------ Original Message ------ From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...> To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.
As usual, your mileage may vary.

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.

A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.

On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:
So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.
My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see? Erik A


--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: follow up to my follow up

mike allen
 

        I seen a couple of them . I have a bud that is a full blown machinist that I plan to get the pro's & cons of the different taper attachments he has on some of his lathes . I'll also show him some

            of the tubes on them & see what he has to say about them . Seems that all the ones i see are for a short part @ 5-10 " . What if a guy wants to turn down & taper a rifle barrel . Does he do it

        5 " at a time & then re-setup ? I'm thinking that if I make one it will be the length between centers on my lathe ?

        animal

On 11/16/2022 7:06 PM, Andrei wrote:

Mike, there are several videos o people making the taper attachments. Did not seem to be overly complicated. 

PS
I am not making one for myself.... ever


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of mike allen <animal@...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2022 9:10 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
 

        I don't have a taper attachment for my lathe , but with the prices for these things these days the only way I will ever get one is

        1.  if it falls of a truck in front of my place (which is highly unlikely    since I own the road & no one can drive by my place )

        2. Someone wants to sell me one for nickels on the dollar

        3. If I make one .

        I'm guessin it will be 3  but anyways  I do have the part that bolts on to the back of the saddle , & that give me a great place to put a indicator for checkin my work & setups without getting in             the  way of anything . It would be a real easy part to make & is super helpful. .

        animal

On 11/16/2022 3:47 PM, Rogan Creswick wrote:
I wish the south bends had more flat (and machined) surfaces on the cross slide and compound for things like this.

It would be convenient to use an angle block / 1-2-3 block and run up against the chuck to set an angle like this, but there are few flat surfaces to set things against.  I imagine you could make something that slid into the toolpost mounting T-Slot and registered against the machined sides of that (they are *probably* parallel to the dovetails...)

I was considering the other night the thought of machining / fabricating a cross slide with a toolholder--no compound--in order to have more fixturing options, greater rigidity, and machined surfaces for setups like this.

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 10:13 AM mike allen <animal@...> wrote:

    I forgot to put the protractor in my last mail . set it on your chuck & the compound .

https://www.amazon.com/VOLCANOES-CLUB-Digital-Angle-Finder-Protractor/dp/B09PN8CQH7/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?gclid=Cj0KCQiAsdKbBhDHARIsANJ6-jdsmSKC5KBsU8eITCCuqNdZ25CMya_6_N4pok28hMiXVaeDRN3PRHoaAsNiEALw_wcB&hvadid=409948644601&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9032186&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=17812276858912524318&hvtargid=kwd-1126019736&hydadcr=1638_11256579&keywords=adjustable+protractor&qid=1668621961&sr=8-2-spons&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGY&psc=1

        animal

On 11/16/2022 7:33 AM, Tyler via groups.io wrote:
Allan is right, the markings are not very accurate, but you can set an angle with only one indicator:

- Set the compound at the approximate angle with the markings.

- Mount an indicator on the compound perpendicular to the work, and on center height.

- Do some math: Find the short side length of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of a known length, like 1.000", and the angle you are trying to hit, like 5 degrees.  This would be 0.0872".

- When you traverse the compound by the hypotenuse length 1.000", the indicator dial should move the length of the triangle side you calculated: 0.0872"

- Adjust the compound angle until you can hit the correct number.  This is tedious but it should get you very close.






On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:56:44 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:


The markings are never accurate enough. If the angle is critical, you make test cuts and measure the workpiece. One way is to test the fit with marking blue and a matching socket. Another way is to measure the workpiece using a pair of dial indicators (one measuring the long feed, one on the cross slide measuring the work). There are other ways, but I find them less accurate or more complex.

allan

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:42 AM E A <b-arch@...> wrote:
All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?
Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.
What am I missing?
Erik A

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
 
Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

Bill in OKC 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:


That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.


Eddie


------ Original Message ------ From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...> To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.
As usual, your mileage may vary.

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.

A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.

On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:
So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.
My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see? Erik A


--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: follow up to my follow up

Andrei
 

Mike, there are several videos o people making the taper attachments. Did not seem to be overly complicated. 

PS
I am not making one for myself.... ever


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of mike allen <animal@...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2022 9:10 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
 

        I don't have a taper attachment for my lathe , but with the prices for these things these days the only way I will ever get one is

        1.  if it falls of a truck in front of my place (which is highly unlikely    since I own the road & no one can drive by my place )

        2. Someone wants to sell me one for nickels on the dollar

        3. If I make one .

        I'm guessin it will be 3  but anyways  I do have the part that bolts on to the back of the saddle , & that give me a great place to put a indicator for checkin my work & setups without getting in             the  way of anything . It would be a real easy part to make & is super helpful. .

        animal

On 11/16/2022 3:47 PM, Rogan Creswick wrote:

I wish the south bends had more flat (and machined) surfaces on the cross slide and compound for things like this.

It would be convenient to use an angle block / 1-2-3 block and run up against the chuck to set an angle like this, but there are few flat surfaces to set things against.  I imagine you could make something that slid into the toolpost mounting T-Slot and registered against the machined sides of that (they are *probably* parallel to the dovetails...)

I was considering the other night the thought of machining / fabricating a cross slide with a toolholder--no compound--in order to have more fixturing options, greater rigidity, and machined surfaces for setups like this.

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 10:13 AM mike allen <animal@...> wrote:

    I forgot to put the protractor in my last mail . set it on your chuck & the compound .

https://www.amazon.com/VOLCANOES-CLUB-Digital-Angle-Finder-Protractor/dp/B09PN8CQH7/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?gclid=Cj0KCQiAsdKbBhDHARIsANJ6-jdsmSKC5KBsU8eITCCuqNdZ25CMya_6_N4pok28hMiXVaeDRN3PRHoaAsNiEALw_wcB&hvadid=409948644601&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9032186&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=17812276858912524318&hvtargid=kwd-1126019736&hydadcr=1638_11256579&keywords=adjustable+protractor&qid=1668621961&sr=8-2-spons&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGY&psc=1

        animal

On 11/16/2022 7:33 AM, Tyler via groups.io wrote:
Allan is right, the markings are not very accurate, but you can set an angle with only one indicator:

- Set the compound at the approximate angle with the markings.

- Mount an indicator on the compound perpendicular to the work, and on center height.

- Do some math: Find the short side length of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of a known length, like 1.000", and the angle you are trying to hit, like 5 degrees.  This would be 0.0872".

- When you traverse the compound by the hypotenuse length 1.000", the indicator dial should move the length of the triangle side you calculated: 0.0872"

- Adjust the compound angle until you can hit the correct number.  This is tedious but it should get you very close.






On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:56:44 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:


The markings are never accurate enough. If the angle is critical, you make test cuts and measure the workpiece. One way is to test the fit with marking blue and a matching socket. Another way is to measure the workpiece using a pair of dial indicators (one measuring the long feed, one on the cross slide measuring the work). There are other ways, but I find them less accurate or more complex.

allan

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:42 AM E A <b-arch@...> wrote:
All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?
Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.
What am I missing?
Erik A

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
 
Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

Bill in OKC 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:


That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.


Eddie


------ Original Message ------ From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...> To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.
As usual, your mileage may vary.

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.

A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.

On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:
So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.
My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see? Erik A


--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: follow up to my follow up

Bill in OKC too
 

They're not milled, they're cast in, ready to machine. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:31:24 PM CST, Rogan Creswick <creswick@...> wrote:


Oh, that's interesting!  Seems like a reasonable price, too. Especially if the T-slots are already milled.

The other thing I'd like to get out of this change is space to attach a DRO.

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 3:59 PM ww_big_al <arknack@...> wrote:

MLA Tools has a cast kit to do this.

http://mlatoolbox.com/S-4382.html

 

Paula on practical machinist forum did a excellent writeup on making it.

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/forum/threads/machining-a-t-slotted-cross-slide.177054/

 

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Rogan Creswick
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2022 6:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

 

I wish the south bends had more flat (and machined) surfaces on the cross slide and compound for things like this.

 

It would be convenient to use an angle block / 1-2-3 block and run up against the chuck to set an angle like this, but there are few flat surfaces to set things against.  I imagine you could make something that slid into the toolpost mounting T-Slot and registered against the machined sides of that (they are *probably* parallel to the dovetails...)

 

I was considering the other night the thought of machining / fabricating a cross slide with a toolholder--no compound--in order to have more fixturing options, greater rigidity, and machined surfaces for setups like this.

 

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 10:13 AM mike allen <animal@...> wrote:

    I forgot to put the protractor in my last mail . set it on your chuck & the compound .

https://www.amazon.com/VOLCANOES-CLUB-Digital-Angle-Finder-Protractor/dp/B09PN8CQH7/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?gclid=Cj0KCQiAsdKbBhDHARIsANJ6-jdsmSKC5KBsU8eITCCuqNdZ25CMya_6_N4pok28hMiXVaeDRN3PRHoaAsNiEALw_wcB&hvadid=409948644601&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9032186&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=17812276858912524318&hvtargid=kwd-1126019736&hydadcr=1638_11256579&keywords=adjustable+protractor&qid=1668621961&sr=8-2-spons&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGY&psc=1

        animal

On 11/16/2022 7:33 AM, Tyler via groups.io wrote:

Allan is right, the markings are not very accurate, but you can set an angle with only one indicator:

 

- Set the compound at the approximate angle with the markings.

 

- Mount an indicator on the compound perpendicular to the work, and on center height.

 

- Do some math: Find the short side length of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of a known length, like 1.000", and the angle you are trying to hit, like 5 degrees.  This would be 0.0872".

 

- When you traverse the compound by the hypotenuse length 1.000", the indicator dial should move the length of the triangle side you calculated: 0.0872"

 

- Adjust the compound angle until you can hit the correct number.  This is tedious but it should get you very close.

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:56:44 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:

 

 

The markings are never accurate enough. If the angle is critical, you make test cuts and measure the workpiece. One way is to test the fit with marking blue and a matching socket. Another way is to measure the workpiece using a pair of dial indicators (one measuring the long feed, one on the cross slide measuring the work). There are other ways, but I find them less accurate or more complex.

 

allan

 

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:42 AM E A <b-arch@...> wrote:

All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?

Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.

What am I missing?
Erik A


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

 

Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

 

Bill in OKC 

 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

 

Aphorisms to live by:

Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 

SEMPER GUMBY!

Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better

 

 

 

On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:

 

 

That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.

 

Eddie



------ Original Message ------ From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...> To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.

As usual, your mileage may vary.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.

A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.

On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:

So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.

My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see? Erik A



--

"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: follow up to my follow up

mike allen
 

        I don't have a taper attachment for my lathe , but with the prices for these things these days the only way I will ever get one is

        1.  if it falls of a truck in front of my place (which is highly unlikely    since I own the road & no one can drive by my place )

        2. Someone wants to sell me one for nickels on the dollar

        3. If I make one .

        I'm guessin it will be 3  but anyways  I do have the part that bolts on to the back of the saddle , & that give me a great place to put a indicator for checkin my work & setups without getting in             the  way of anything . It would be a real easy part to make & is super helpful. .

        animal

On 11/16/2022 3:47 PM, Rogan Creswick wrote:

I wish the south bends had more flat (and machined) surfaces on the cross slide and compound for things like this.

It would be convenient to use an angle block / 1-2-3 block and run up against the chuck to set an angle like this, but there are few flat surfaces to set things against.  I imagine you could make something that slid into the toolpost mounting T-Slot and registered against the machined sides of that (they are *probably* parallel to the dovetails...)

I was considering the other night the thought of machining / fabricating a cross slide with a toolholder--no compound--in order to have more fixturing options, greater rigidity, and machined surfaces for setups like this.

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 10:13 AM mike allen <animal@...> wrote:

    I forgot to put the protractor in my last mail . set it on your chuck & the compound .

https://www.amazon.com/VOLCANOES-CLUB-Digital-Angle-Finder-Protractor/dp/B09PN8CQH7/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?gclid=Cj0KCQiAsdKbBhDHARIsANJ6-jdsmSKC5KBsU8eITCCuqNdZ25CMya_6_N4pok28hMiXVaeDRN3PRHoaAsNiEALw_wcB&hvadid=409948644601&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9032186&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=17812276858912524318&hvtargid=kwd-1126019736&hydadcr=1638_11256579&keywords=adjustable+protractor&qid=1668621961&sr=8-2-spons&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGY&psc=1

        animal

On 11/16/2022 7:33 AM, Tyler via groups.io wrote:
Allan is right, the markings are not very accurate, but you can set an angle with only one indicator:

- Set the compound at the approximate angle with the markings.

- Mount an indicator on the compound perpendicular to the work, and on center height.

- Do some math: Find the short side length of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of a known length, like 1.000", and the angle you are trying to hit, like 5 degrees.  This would be 0.0872".

- When you traverse the compound by the hypotenuse length 1.000", the indicator dial should move the length of the triangle side you calculated: 0.0872"

- Adjust the compound angle until you can hit the correct number.  This is tedious but it should get you very close.






On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:56:44 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:


The markings are never accurate enough. If the angle is critical, you make test cuts and measure the workpiece. One way is to test the fit with marking blue and a matching socket. Another way is to measure the workpiece using a pair of dial indicators (one measuring the long feed, one on the cross slide measuring the work). There are other ways, but I find them less accurate or more complex.

allan

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:42 AM E A <b-arch@...> wrote:
All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?
Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.
What am I missing?
Erik A

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
 
Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

Bill in OKC 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:


That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.


Eddie


------ Original Message ------ From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...> To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.
As usual, your mileage may vary.

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.

A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.

On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:
So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.
My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see? Erik A


--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: follow up to my follow up

mike allen
 

        The dovetail is the elephant in the room . From looking at them its a pretty simple one to make " if " you have the ability to cut dovetails .

        animal


On 11/16/2022 4:31 PM, Rogan Creswick wrote:

Oh, that's interesting!  Seems like a reasonable price, too. Especially if the T-slots are already milled.

The other thing I'd like to get out of this change is space to attach a DRO.

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 3:59 PM ww_big_al <arknack@...> wrote:

MLA Tools has a cast kit to do this.

http://mlatoolbox.com/S-4382.html

 

Paula on practical machinist forum did a excellent writeup on making it.

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/forum/threads/machining-a-t-slotted-cross-slide.177054/

 

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Rogan Creswick
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2022 6:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

 

I wish the south bends had more flat (and machined) surfaces on the cross slide and compound for things like this.

 

It would be convenient to use an angle block / 1-2-3 block and run up against the chuck to set an angle like this, but there are few flat surfaces to set things against.  I imagine you could make something that slid into the toolpost mounting T-Slot and registered against the machined sides of that (they are *probably* parallel to the dovetails...)

 

I was considering the other night the thought of machining / fabricating a cross slide with a toolholder--no compound--in order to have more fixturing options, greater rigidity, and machined surfaces for setups like this.

 

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 10:13 AM mike allen <animal@...> wrote:

    I forgot to put the protractor in my last mail . set it on your chuck & the compound .

https://www.amazon.com/VOLCANOES-CLUB-Digital-Angle-Finder-Protractor/dp/B09PN8CQH7/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?gclid=Cj0KCQiAsdKbBhDHARIsANJ6-jdsmSKC5KBsU8eITCCuqNdZ25CMya_6_N4pok28hMiXVaeDRN3PRHoaAsNiEALw_wcB&hvadid=409948644601&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9032186&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=17812276858912524318&hvtargid=kwd-1126019736&hydadcr=1638_11256579&keywords=adjustable+protractor&qid=1668621961&sr=8-2-spons&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGY&psc=1

        animal

On 11/16/2022 7:33 AM, Tyler via groups.io wrote:

Allan is right, the markings are not very accurate, but you can set an angle with only one indicator:

 

- Set the compound at the approximate angle with the markings.

 

- Mount an indicator on the compound perpendicular to the work, and on center height.

 

- Do some math: Find the short side length of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of a known length, like 1.000", and the angle you are trying to hit, like 5 degrees.  This would be 0.0872".

 

- When you traverse the compound by the hypotenuse length 1.000", the indicator dial should move the length of the triangle side you calculated: 0.0872"

 

- Adjust the compound angle until you can hit the correct number.  This is tedious but it should get you very close.

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:56:44 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:

 

 

The markings are never accurate enough. If the angle is critical, you make test cuts and measure the workpiece. One way is to test the fit with marking blue and a matching socket. Another way is to measure the workpiece using a pair of dial indicators (one measuring the long feed, one on the cross slide measuring the work). There are other ways, but I find them less accurate or more complex.

 

allan

 

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:42 AM E A <b-arch@...> wrote:

All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?

Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.

What am I missing?
Erik A


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

 

Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

 

Bill in OKC 

 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

 

Aphorisms to live by:

Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 

SEMPER GUMBY!

Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better

 

 

 

On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:

 

 

That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.

 

Eddie



------ Original Message ------ From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...> To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.

As usual, your mileage may vary.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.

A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.

On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:

So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.

My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see? Erik A



--

"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: follow up to my follow up

Rogan Creswick
 

Oh, that's interesting!  Seems like a reasonable price, too. Especially if the T-slots are already milled.

The other thing I'd like to get out of this change is space to attach a DRO.

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 3:59 PM ww_big_al <arknack@...> wrote:

MLA Tools has a cast kit to do this.

http://mlatoolbox.com/S-4382.html

 

Paula on practical machinist forum did a excellent writeup on making it.

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/forum/threads/machining-a-t-slotted-cross-slide.177054/

 

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Rogan Creswick
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2022 6:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

 

I wish the south bends had more flat (and machined) surfaces on the cross slide and compound for things like this.

 

It would be convenient to use an angle block / 1-2-3 block and run up against the chuck to set an angle like this, but there are few flat surfaces to set things against.  I imagine you could make something that slid into the toolpost mounting T-Slot and registered against the machined sides of that (they are *probably* parallel to the dovetails...)

 

I was considering the other night the thought of machining / fabricating a cross slide with a toolholder--no compound--in order to have more fixturing options, greater rigidity, and machined surfaces for setups like this.

 

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 10:13 AM mike allen <animal@...> wrote:

    I forgot to put the protractor in my last mail . set it on your chuck & the compound .

https://www.amazon.com/VOLCANOES-CLUB-Digital-Angle-Finder-Protractor/dp/B09PN8CQH7/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?gclid=Cj0KCQiAsdKbBhDHARIsANJ6-jdsmSKC5KBsU8eITCCuqNdZ25CMya_6_N4pok28hMiXVaeDRN3PRHoaAsNiEALw_wcB&hvadid=409948644601&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9032186&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=17812276858912524318&hvtargid=kwd-1126019736&hydadcr=1638_11256579&keywords=adjustable+protractor&qid=1668621961&sr=8-2-spons&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGY&psc=1

        animal

On 11/16/2022 7:33 AM, Tyler via groups.io wrote:

Allan is right, the markings are not very accurate, but you can set an angle with only one indicator:

 

- Set the compound at the approximate angle with the markings.

 

- Mount an indicator on the compound perpendicular to the work, and on center height.

 

- Do some math: Find the short side length of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of a known length, like 1.000", and the angle you are trying to hit, like 5 degrees.  This would be 0.0872".

 

- When you traverse the compound by the hypotenuse length 1.000", the indicator dial should move the length of the triangle side you calculated: 0.0872"

 

- Adjust the compound angle until you can hit the correct number.  This is tedious but it should get you very close.

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:56:44 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:

 

 

The markings are never accurate enough. If the angle is critical, you make test cuts and measure the workpiece. One way is to test the fit with marking blue and a matching socket. Another way is to measure the workpiece using a pair of dial indicators (one measuring the long feed, one on the cross slide measuring the work). There are other ways, but I find them less accurate or more complex.

 

allan

 

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:42 AM E A <b-arch@...> wrote:

All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?

Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.

What am I missing?
Erik A


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

 

Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

 

Bill in OKC 

 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

 

Aphorisms to live by:

Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 

SEMPER GUMBY!

Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better

 

 

 

On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:

 

 

That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.

 

Eddie



------ Original Message ------ From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...> To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.

As usual, your mileage may vary.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.

A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.

On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:

So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.

My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see? Erik A



--

"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: follow up to my follow up

ww_big_al
 

MLA Tools has a cast kit to do this.

http://mlatoolbox.com/S-4382.html

 

Paula on practical machinist forum did a excellent writeup on making it.

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/forum/threads/machining-a-t-slotted-cross-slide.177054/

 

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Rogan Creswick
Sent: Wednesday, November 16, 2022 6:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

 

I wish the south bends had more flat (and machined) surfaces on the cross slide and compound for things like this.

 

It would be convenient to use an angle block / 1-2-3 block and run up against the chuck to set an angle like this, but there are few flat surfaces to set things against.  I imagine you could make something that slid into the toolpost mounting T-Slot and registered against the machined sides of that (they are *probably* parallel to the dovetails...)

 

I was considering the other night the thought of machining / fabricating a cross slide with a toolholder--no compound--in order to have more fixturing options, greater rigidity, and machined surfaces for setups like this.

 

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 10:13 AM mike allen <animal@...> wrote:

    I forgot to put the protractor in my last mail . set it on your chuck & the compound .

https://www.amazon.com/VOLCANOES-CLUB-Digital-Angle-Finder-Protractor/dp/B09PN8CQH7/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?gclid=Cj0KCQiAsdKbBhDHARIsANJ6-jdsmSKC5KBsU8eITCCuqNdZ25CMya_6_N4pok28hMiXVaeDRN3PRHoaAsNiEALw_wcB&hvadid=409948644601&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9032186&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=17812276858912524318&hvtargid=kwd-1126019736&hydadcr=1638_11256579&keywords=adjustable+protractor&qid=1668621961&sr=8-2-spons&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGY&psc=1

        animal

On 11/16/2022 7:33 AM, Tyler via groups.io wrote:

Allan is right, the markings are not very accurate, but you can set an angle with only one indicator:

 

- Set the compound at the approximate angle with the markings.

 

- Mount an indicator on the compound perpendicular to the work, and on center height.

 

- Do some math: Find the short side length of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of a known length, like 1.000", and the angle you are trying to hit, like 5 degrees.  This would be 0.0872".

 

- When you traverse the compound by the hypotenuse length 1.000", the indicator dial should move the length of the triangle side you calculated: 0.0872"

 

- Adjust the compound angle until you can hit the correct number.  This is tedious but it should get you very close.

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:56:44 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:

 

 

The markings are never accurate enough. If the angle is critical, you make test cuts and measure the workpiece. One way is to test the fit with marking blue and a matching socket. Another way is to measure the workpiece using a pair of dial indicators (one measuring the long feed, one on the cross slide measuring the work). There are other ways, but I find them less accurate or more complex.

 

allan

 

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:42 AM E A <b-arch@...> wrote:

All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?

Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.

What am I missing?
Erik A


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

 

Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

 

Bill in OKC 

 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

 

Aphorisms to live by:

Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 

SEMPER GUMBY!

Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better

 

 

 

On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:

 

 

That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.

 

Eddie



------ Original Message ------ From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...> To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.

As usual, your mileage may vary.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.

A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.

On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:

So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.

My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see? Erik A



--

"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: follow up to my follow up

Rogan Creswick
 

I wish the south bends had more flat (and machined) surfaces on the cross slide and compound for things like this.

It would be convenient to use an angle block / 1-2-3 block and run up against the chuck to set an angle like this, but there are few flat surfaces to set things against.  I imagine you could make something that slid into the toolpost mounting T-Slot and registered against the machined sides of that (they are *probably* parallel to the dovetails...)

I was considering the other night the thought of machining / fabricating a cross slide with a toolholder--no compound--in order to have more fixturing options, greater rigidity, and machined surfaces for setups like this.

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 10:13 AM mike allen <animal@...> wrote:

    I forgot to put the protractor in my last mail . set it on your chuck & the compound .

https://www.amazon.com/VOLCANOES-CLUB-Digital-Angle-Finder-Protractor/dp/B09PN8CQH7/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?gclid=Cj0KCQiAsdKbBhDHARIsANJ6-jdsmSKC5KBsU8eITCCuqNdZ25CMya_6_N4pok28hMiXVaeDRN3PRHoaAsNiEALw_wcB&hvadid=409948644601&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9032186&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=17812276858912524318&hvtargid=kwd-1126019736&hydadcr=1638_11256579&keywords=adjustable+protractor&qid=1668621961&sr=8-2-spons&sp_csd=d2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGY&psc=1

        animal

On 11/16/2022 7:33 AM, Tyler via groups.io wrote:
Allan is right, the markings are not very accurate, but you can set an angle with only one indicator:

- Set the compound at the approximate angle with the markings.

- Mount an indicator on the compound perpendicular to the work, and on center height.

- Do some math: Find the short side length of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of a known length, like 1.000", and the angle you are trying to hit, like 5 degrees.  This would be 0.0872".

- When you traverse the compound by the hypotenuse length 1.000", the indicator dial should move the length of the triangle side you calculated: 0.0872"

- Adjust the compound angle until you can hit the correct number.  This is tedious but it should get you very close.






On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:56:44 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:


The markings are never accurate enough. If the angle is critical, you make test cuts and measure the workpiece. One way is to test the fit with marking blue and a matching socket. Another way is to measure the workpiece using a pair of dial indicators (one measuring the long feed, one on the cross slide measuring the work). There are other ways, but I find them less accurate or more complex.

allan

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:42 AM E A <b-arch@...> wrote:
All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?
Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.
What am I missing?
Erik A

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
 
Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

Bill in OKC 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:


That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.


Eddie


------ Original Message ------ From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...> To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.
As usual, your mileage may vary.

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.

A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.

On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:
So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.
My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see? Erik A


--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: 9" countershaft mods

Payson
 

Wow! Nicely done.

Payson


Re: follow up to my follow up

mike allen
 

Allan is right, the markings are not very accurate, but you can set an angle with only one indicator:

- Set the compound at the approximate angle with the markings.

- Mount an indicator on the compound perpendicular to the work, and on center height.

- Do some math: Find the short side length of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of a known length, like 1.000", and the angle you are trying to hit, like 5 degrees.  This would be 0.0872".

- When you traverse the compound by the hypotenuse length 1.000", the indicator dial should move the length of the triangle side you calculated: 0.0872"

- Adjust the compound angle until you can hit the correct number.  This is tedious but it should get you very close.






On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:56:44 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:


The markings are never accurate enough. If the angle is critical, you make test cuts and measure the workpiece. One way is to test the fit with marking blue and a matching socket. Another way is to measure the workpiece using a pair of dial indicators (one measuring the long feed, one on the cross slide measuring the work). There are other ways, but I find them less accurate or more complex.

allan

On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:42 AM E A <b-arch@...> wrote:
All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?
Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.
What am I missing?
Erik A

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
 
Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

Bill in OKC 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:


That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.


Eddie


------ Original Message ------ From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...> To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.
As usual, your mileage may vary.

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.

A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.

On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:
So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.
My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see? Erik A


--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: follow up to my follow up

mike allen
 

     It's been quit some time since I turned a taper & I don't have my lathe in front ot me , but I'm   Take it to 90 deg & back it off 5 deg " ( 85 deg )  ?

        animal


        animal

On 11/16/2022 4:42 AM, E A wrote:

All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?
Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.
What am I missing?
Erik A

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
 
Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

Bill in OKC 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:


That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.


Eddie


------ Original Message ------ From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...> To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24 Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.
As usual, your mileage may vary.

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.

A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.

On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:
So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.
My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see? Erik A


Re: follow up to my follow up

Jim_B
 


If you have an existing taper, and you can mount it true to the bed, then, using a DI you can set the compound to match the existing taper exactly (Well very closely.)

In the picture, I am offsetting the tailstock, which has a small boring head inserted, to match an existing B&S taper. 



Jim B.

Dr. James A Benjamin
1629 Riverview Drive. Apt 416
Deerfield Beach, FL 33441




On Nov 16, 2022, at 7:42 AM, E A <b-arch@...> wrote:

All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?
Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.
What am I missing?
Erik A


_._,_._,_


--
Jim B


Re: follow up to my follow up

Tyler
 

Allan is right, the markings are not very accurate, but you can set an angle with only one indicator:

- Set the compound at the approximate angle with the markings.

- Mount an indicator on the compound perpendicular to the work, and on center height.

- Do some math: Find the short side length of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of a known length, like 1.000", and the angle you are trying to hit, like 5 degrees.  This would be 0.0872".

- When you traverse the compound by the hypotenuse length 1.000", the indicator dial should move the length of the triangle side you calculated: 0.0872"

- Adjust the compound angle until you can hit the correct number.  This is tedious but it should get you very close.






On Wednesday, November 16, 2022 at 06:56:44 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:


The markings are never accurate enough. If the angle is critical, you make test cuts and measure the workpiece. One way is to test the fit with marking blue and a matching socket. Another way is to measure the workpiece using a pair of dial indicators (one measuring the long feed, one on the cross slide measuring the work). There are other ways, but I find them less accurate or more complex.

allan


On Wed, Nov 16, 2022 at 7:42 AM E A <b-arch@...> wrote:
All, back to my original question... How does one cut an accurate taper (like 5 degrees or so) when the markings stop at 90?
Am I going the wrong direction? If you rotate the compound the other direction, you theoretically can set it accurately, but then your hand interferes with the chuck.
What am I missing?
Erik A

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 6:59 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up
 
Hmmm. I resemble that remark.  :)

Bill in OKC 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. 
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 03:10:31 PM CST, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:


That's 30" you can fill with antiques or junque. Seems to be what happens to me.


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "Andrei" <calciu1@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, 15 Nov, 22 At 20:24
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

General advice is to keep the lathe 30 inches away from a wall, however, a human needs a minimum of 18 inches to fit somewhere.

As usual, your mileage may vary.

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Davis Johnson <davis@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2022 2:51 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] follow up to my follow up

Or put the fixed mark in the rear? On mine at least. You either stand on your head or use a mirror. My guess is that they thought you would just walk around to the back. My lathe (and a great many others) is against a wall.


A previous owner added a mark in front, but they got it about 2 degrees off.


On 11/15/22 14:20, E A wrote:
So per folks's suggestions, I turned a plug to fit into my ss tubing at 5 degrees, which worked perfectly.
My question is about the compound slide... Why did SB stop the degree marks at 90? To set the compound up for my 5 degree cut, I had to overshoot 90, and take a guess as to what 5 degrees was. Did SB have some greater plan that I fail to see?
Erik A



--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"

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