Re: Turning Troubles


gorvil
 

John,

I have sometimes had the work piece try to "climb" the tool when it
is mounted below center line. In effect the tool pulls the workpiece
into itself. This is more pronounced when there is a lot of overhang
as in a rocker style toolpost.

The angle of the tool to the work should be set up so that the forces
tend to push the tool away from the work, rather than pulling it in.
I think there is a discussion of this in How To Run a Lathe.


Glen Reeser



--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "jem1043" <millermohr@w...>
wrote:
--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "jem1043" <millermohr@w...>
wrote:
I am not very experienced at machining and I have a problem with
turning a outside diameter with my South Bend 9" lathe.
I have turned the gibs so tight that it is not easy to turn the
dials
but I still get gouges in a cylinder that I am trying to get to a
specific diameter.
Also, if I power feed towards the headstock and then power feed
toward
the tail stock the cutter removes material in both directions?
I generally use the rocker tool mount and I have used cutting
tools
that are HSS, the "tangential tool" and carbide tipped tools. The
tangential cutting tool seems to give me the best control and
finish.
I have tried moving the cross slide towards the back of the lathe
and
then towards me to remove as much "play" as possible and that
seems
to
be the best. But what a pain to find a place to get the tool
closer
to
the turning center line and then move it back to the setting I
need
to
turn.
Maybe this lathe is just worn out. I don't use it much but I
would
like to be able to use it when I need it.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
John

All:
Thanks for all the comments.
I was turning a .5 inch diameter steel rod that was about 5 inches
long. One end was in a 3 jaw chuck with the other by a "dead
center"
in the tail stock.
The tool might have been at the wrong height, but it was aligned
by eye with the "dead center" which had been aligned with a center
in
the head stock. One of the tools I was using was a brand new
indexable
carbide with a 7 degree clearance angle. Another was the "diamond
tool", which gave better results.
Which case would cause the tool bit to "dig in" more. The tool
above
center or below?

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