Re: hand file


Bill in OKC too
 

I skipped the Gingery lathe since I'm seriously bad at follow-through, and went for a 7x10 mini-lathe. Upgraded that to an Atlas TH42, and I have a restoration project South Bend Heavy 10L sitting here waiting for me to get my shop the rest of the way together. I built the tank to electrolytically remove the rust from the bed this past Fall, but I can't get it in to the lathe to give it a good dunking. I was having trouble with the 7x10 so took a class, finally, at my wife's command. That has eaten a lot of my shop time, too, but taught me much, including how to accurately measure stuff. Critical skill on any lathe. Can't reasonably blame the 7x10 when you cannot measure a part and get an accurate result. Class is almost over. Last night I made a 1-3/4"-4tpi ACME stub thread. I need to chamfer the part, and face the other end to the proper length, and then my final project will be a nut to fit that thread. Assuming it measures correctly, of course. Otherwise I need to remount the part, pick up the thread again, and fix it, or re-do it. I thought I had until the week before Memorial Day, but class ends May 10th. If I can get this stuff done in time, I can get the certificate for the class. Which could get me a job if I decided I need one. So I want it, but...

All my machines are desktop or benchtop except a couple of drill presses. The biggest mill is also a lathe and drill press. Smithy CB-1220XL, also have a HF mini-mill, and an Atlas MF horizontal mill, none of which are currently operational. I expected to be able to use class machines, but at the end of this semester, the school won't be enrolling adult students anymore, only high-schoolers. I has a sad! :(

Just means I need to finish the shop, then finish the restorations on all the machines.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better


On Thursday, April 14, 2022, 11:37:57 AM CDT, Nick Andrews <nickjandrews@...> wrote:


Maybe, we're in a lot of the same groups, too!  I still need to make a forge burner for the casting setup, and crucible tongs.  SO glad I have a bigger, better lathe and mill now.  It would've taken me a couple decades to actually build the Gingery lathe, and the ones I've seen being used on Youtube look pretty flimsy in comparison.  I am thinking I will be buying a horizontal attachment for my BP mill now.

On Thu, Apr 14, 2022 at 11:30 AM Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hmmm. Are we twins separated at birth or something? I have an anvil I've been dragging around since 1985, a set of DIY tongs from Amazon, purchased a year or so ago. Need holes drilled, and either riveted or bolted together. I've had the timbers cut for my 4th attempt at an anvil stand...

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better


On Thursday, April 14, 2022, 11:26:40 AM CDT, Nick Andrews <nickjandrews@...> wrote:


Aaaaaaand an old, crapped-out file can be round smooth and turned into a scraper tool as well, or made into something else by them blacksmithing types.  No, I really don't need another hobby.

On Wed, Apr 13, 2022 at 10:07 PM wmrmeyers@... <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:
Good info, too! And an advantage to getting good files. Though if you buy cheap files you can grind safe edges on them for special purposes, or just because you want to. So another advantage to cheap files. Where it would hurt to do that to a good Nicholson file for a one-time use, it can be a really good idea for a file you didn't spend much money on that will help you do a special job you don't need to do frequently.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.) 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 08:43:36 PM CDT, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


IMHO
As important as the maker is the type of file. Single cut, double cut, bastard, Swiss pattern, are a few.
For many years now, I have been using Swiss pattern with clean edges. I find that the finish I can get is superior to others and the clean edges let me get next to expensive collets without marking them up.


Jim B,

> On Apr 13, 2022, at 9:35 PM, Nelson Collar via groups.io <nel2lar=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Nicholson might not be the best around but for my money it is Nicholson!!!
> Cheep files are not worth there weight, steer away from the cheep ones.
> Or buy from stores with a good return policy, buy it, test drive it, and return if the drive is not what you want.
> Tools are too expensive to waste your money on junk!
> Good luck and may the rest drive save you the BUCKS!
> Nelson
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> On Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 04:00:09 PM EDT, Mel Gross <melgross@...> wrote:
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> Unfortunately, Nicholson isn’t what it used to be. Really, most files are pretty good these days. You skill in using them is just as important as the files themselves.
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> Mel
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>> On Apr 13, 2022, at 9:39 AM, Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch=centurylink.net@groups.io> wrote:
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>> 
>> What is a good brand of hand files?  I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.
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--
Jim B





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