Re: turning hardened steel


Ondrej Krejci
 

Greetings,

The scrap stock would be turned up and left in the lathe.  That way it would be as concentric as possible when clamping the collet holder on it.
Carbide generally performs well at high speeds, but threading is done more slowly, even CNC lathes need lead in and out paths.
As for cutting depths, equal area has worked best for me; i.e. first pass at 0.015" to 0.010", then gradually down to 0.003" or 0.002" leaving 0.001" for finishing with a spring pass or air cut.

Best Wishes,


OK

On Wednesday, October 6, 2021, 11:35:09 AM EDT, William Nelson <wnnelson@...> wrote:


That was my plan with the scrap stock to get it as concentric as possible. Now the problem is taking light cuts with carbide. Carbide normally from what I've read want's high rpm and large feeds that wont work well in this situation. Will the micro grain carbide with a super sharp edge allow you to take light cuts? I have had very little opportunity to use carbide on the lathe and had mixed results. Putting the collet chuck in the 3 jaw chuck doesn't appear to give any benefit over just using the 3 jaw alone. The possibility of increased run out rather than less seem likely. I want to use the hex collet chuck so I can turn some particular parts and then bring the block to the mill and do some milling without removing the part.  I was hoping to get good repeatability this way. This seems like a simple way to machine my parts but getting there may be the problem.

Bill from Socal

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