Re: South Bend Model "N" Owners - Resources


david_g4000
 

Louis,

Thanks for the feedback, and I really enjoy learning more history of the N series and the comparisons you pointed out. Mine is a 1931 which was delivered to a utility company machine shop where it seems to have seen limited use as well. Someone at the shop let me know that it was going to be surplussed and that it had not been run for at least 30 years. So, it is in great condition as well. I recently modified it to upgrade from 3/4hp to 1.5hp, 3 Phase. The old motor needed re-winding and the cost was too much. It's nice that the new motor has lifetime lubrication, which I'm sure will outlive me as well.

It wish I had a larger spindle bore sometimes like your Heavy 10. But, I can dog drive larger work pieces between centers if needed.

I will take a look at the Series S.

Thanks,

Dave

On 7/25/2020 2:07 PM, Louis via groups.io wrote:
Everything in your write-up looks fine to me.
I too have a model 'N' but a smaller 9x34 dating to roughly 1933. I've owned mine now for 4 years and it's my go-to lathe for smaller work.?

My 9" has a heavier built headstock compared to other 9" South Bends of the same era. The bed is also wider and has the same cross section as my ~1944 Heavy 10. It also has the similar heavy double walled apron and the cross feed and compound both have adjustable tapered gibs. My research indicates that Model 'N's were the more expensive commercial line lathes. During the Great Depression South Bend cut out some of those more expensive features to reduce the cost in some of their other lines.

My 9" sat unused for many decades and shows little wear. Although the controls are slightly different, in practice they work similar to the Heavy 10. Given how overbuilt it is, I expect it will outlive me by many years.

Just for interest's sake, my Heavy 10 is also an unusual model, a Series 'S' benchtop model. It's labelled as a 10L 487Z and has the large bore spindle. However, it has the typical SB rear countershaft not an undermount drive. The lathe is illustrated in the 1941 South Bend catalog on page 41 along with the 487Z catalog number.?

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