Re: chuck

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Apologies for getting completely off topic here, but I can't resist it!

I too would be fascinated.  I have worked on locomotive & multiple unit maintenance and consultancy for British Rail and its successors since 1973.  We ran thousands of DC motors and generators, but new stuff has mostly been all AC for the last 20 years.  The problems you get due to the dust are electrical tracking due to carbon brush debris build up and you also get build up of brake dust (rust) that tends to etch itself into the varnish, just like it does into body paint.  We don't like blowing things through with compressed air because of health hazards, but making machines more reliable by not blowing the debris out is a new one on me!  Perhaps they installed better air filtration and started wiping out the motors with solvent instead, not just stopped blowing them through?  Those would certainly help.

We had a winter problem a few years ago with the "wrong sort of snow".  We don't normally get fine powdery stuff here, just big soggy flakes.  The powdery stuff got into a lot of motors, melted and they went fizz.

Eddie

On Wednesday, 22 April 2020, 20:24:05 BST, glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...> wrote:


Any idea why they saw a reduced failure rate?  In other words, what effect did not cleaning them out have on motor life?

We have 4 traction motor locos running at present. I’d like to pass on the info.

Thanks
Glenn
> On Apr 22, 2020, at 9:30 AM, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:
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>        WOW!
>
>        animal
>
>> On 4/22/2020 5:35 AM, Stephen Bartlett via groups.io wrote:
>> A brief paragraph in Railway Age Magazine (Industry trade publication) in the mid 1960's mentioned that the Pennsylvania Railroad shops had stopped blowing out locomotive traction motors with compressed air during routine maintenance and had reduced the motor failure rate 50%.
>>
>> Steve Bartlett
>>
>>
>> Re: chuck
>> From: Nitro
>> Date: Tue, 21 Apr 2020 06:51:07 EDT
>>
>> I both oil mine and do frequent teardowns.
>> They spit a little oil when running, but like I say about a motorcycle chain, if it ain't painting a stripe up your back when riding the bike, you ain't oiling it enough.
>> I use compressed air is for filling tires on my bikes, not cleaning machinery  ;)
>>
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