Topics

Morse Code Tutor PCB


Bruce Hall
 

All,

Following in Dave KI4PSR's footsteps, I designed another PCB for the Morse Code Tutor.  To keep costs down I am not selling the PCB. Instead, I am publishing the gerbers so that you can obtain your own.  My cost for five boards at JLCPCB was $1.46 each plus shipping.

The PCB is roughly 5.5" x 2.75" in size.  All components can be board mounted.

I also prepared a set of building instructions. The Bill of Materials includes part numbers and links for Digikey and Mouser.

Here are a few links to the documentation:

Build Instructions: http://w8bh.net/MorseTutor9.pdf

Bruce



lostfrogsrecords
 

Excellent work Bruce!  I think having all components mounted on a single board is the best way to do this, especially for group builds.  My 16 conductor ribbon cable wiring harness allows flexibility for placing the controls, but it takes a lot of time consuming work.  I knew there was no chance of having that harness wired up from scratch in a group build, so I prepared them ahead of time (50 sets, took me days to finish).  And I did not do a whole lot of documentation since the build was going to be supervised.  Your instructions and parts list is what is needed.

Although I still have some of my 'classic' PC boards for sale, I think that new builders should use your design.
My board began life as a simple way to facilitate the group build and turned into a bit more of a project than I intended.
Thank you for the enhanced software and now the pcb!

Dave, KI4PSR


Fred Piering
 

Bruce:
Excellent Job. Well done. First Class. Would make a good article or small book.
Of course, as you know I have my hand built, which continues to work flawlessly!
Certainly appreciate and have taken advantage of all your good work.
With Kind Regards
73
Fred
WD9HNU


On 9/22/2019 3:10 PM, Bruce Hall wrote:
All,

Following in Dave KI4PSR's footsteps, I designed another PCB for the Morse Code Tutor.  To keep costs down I am not selling the PCB. Instead, I am publishing the gerbers so that you can obtain your own.  My cost for five boards at JLCPCB was $1.46 each plus shipping.

The PCB is roughly 5.5" x 2.75" in size.  All components can be board mounted.

I also prepared a set of building instructions. The Bill of Materials includes part numbers and links for Digikey and Mouser.

Here are a few links to the documentation:

Build Instructions: http://w8bh.net/MorseTutor9.pdf

Bruce




Ken KM4NFQ <km4nfq@...>
 

Greetings,

I would like to mention that I think it is a nice touch that there is a hole for a stand-off very near the Rotary Encoder, so pressing the Switch doesn't bow the board. Well done, Bruce, W8BH.

Hole.png

Regards,
Ken, KM4NFQ "Not Fully Qualified"
https://github.com/muurtikaar/mega-morse-tutor


Regards,
Ken, KM4NFQ "Not Fully Qualified"
https://github.com/muurtikaar/mega-morse-tutor


On Sun, Sep 22, 2019 at 3:11 PM Bruce Hall <bhall66@...> wrote:
All,

Following in Dave KI4PSR's footsteps, I designed another PCB for the Morse Code Tutor.  To keep costs down I am not selling the PCB. Instead, I am publishing the gerbers so that you can obtain your own.  My cost for five boards at JLCPCB was $1.46 each plus shipping.

The PCB is roughly 5.5" x 2.75" in size.  All components can be board mounted.

I also prepared a set of building instructions. The Bill of Materials includes part numbers and links for Digikey and Mouser.

Here are a few links to the documentation:

Build Instructions: http://w8bh.net/MorseTutor9.pdf

Bruce



Jim Ivy AD0ZR
 

Hello Bruce.

Downloaded your gerbers and had some of the boards made ay JLCPCB. Have one of the boards populated and running your updated code with the new pin assignments. I had completed the board prior to you updating the pin assignments. I dug into the schematics and re-assigned the pins and had it operating as intended. My internet service was down for over a week so no access to GitHub. Replaced my updated pin assignments with yours and still running great.

Only issue I had with the board is the is the mounting of the speaker you had in the BOM. The pins of the speaker are 1.0 mm did and the mounting holes are about 0.8 mm.  Don't know if this is a error in the gerbers or a manufacturing issue. I used some male pins for servo connects and soldered them to the speaker pins. Those pins fit nicely in the PCB holes.

Jim Ivy / AD0ZR


Bruce Hall
 

Hello Jim,

I updated the gerbers on 10/3/19 to accommodate speakers with the larger 1 mm pins.   Adafruit speakers with 0.7 mm pins will fit on the older boards.   

The error was mine; I did not realize that similar speakers used different-sized pins.

Bruce

On Fri, Oct 11, 2019 at 12:54 PM Jim Ivy AD0ZR <cutsrock@...> wrote:
Hello Bruce.

Downloaded your gerbers and had some of the boards made ay JLCPCB. Have one of the boards populated and running your updated code with the new pin assignments. I had completed the board prior to you updating the pin assignments. I dug into the schematics and re-assigned the pins and had it operating as intended. My internet service was down for over a week so no access to GitHub. Replaced my updated pin assignments with yours and still running great.

Only issue I had with the board is the is the mounting of the speaker you had in the BOM. The pins of the speaker are 1.0 mm did and the mounting holes are about 0.8 mm.  Don't know if this is a error in the gerbers or a manufacturing issue. I used some male pins for servo connects and soldered them to the speaker pins. Those pins fit nicely in the PCB holes.

Jim Ivy / AD0ZR


Jim Ivy AD0ZR
 

Hello Bruce,

Thanks for the info. I only had 3 of the speakers with the larger pins. I have ordered some with .7 mm pins.  Will download the updated gerbers and place the older ones in the trash file.  I received my board order around the 27th of Sep. It was a learning experience for me working out the pin assignments.  I think the only one I handled differently from what you did was the rst pin. The board is exactly what I was considering doing. So I thank you for the gerbers and excellent board. JLCPCB did a very good job on their manufacture.  I ordered 10 but may only build 4 or 5. The rest I'll probably offer to my club members.

Thanks again.

Jim Ivy / AD0ZR


Bruce Hall
 

All,

I have a few more updates for the Morse Code Tutor.
- Iambic Mode A, Iambic Mode B, and straight key.
- New Head-Copy feature.
- Callsign customization at runtime.
- Small bug fix for display of SD-card files.

I ported my BluePill code to the ESP32 platform.
Two ESP32 tutors can communicate with each other using the built-in WiFi radios.
Gerbers for the BluePill and ESP32 versions of the PCB are online.
PCBs for 2.7" and 3.2" displays will be released soon.

30-second ESP32 video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tp74gO6lAm0
User's Guide: http://w8bh.net/MorseTutor10.pdf
Build Instructions: http://w8bh.net/MorseTutor9.pdf
Software Tutorial:  http://w8bh.net/MorseTutor1.pdf
Source Code: https://github.com/bhall66/morse-tutor
PCB Gerbers: https://github.com/bhall66/morse-tutor

Bruce
w8bh.net




On Sun, Sep 22, 2019 at 3:11 PM Bruce Hall via Groups.Io <bhall66=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
All,

Following in Dave KI4PSR's footsteps, I designed another PCB for the Morse Code Tutor.  To keep costs down I am not selling the PCB. Instead, I am publishing the gerbers so that you can obtain your own.  My cost for five boards at JLCPCB was $1.46 each plus shipping.

The PCB is roughly 5.5" x 2.75" in size.  All components can be board mounted.

I also prepared a set of building instructions. The Bill of Materials includes part numbers and links for Digikey and Mouser.

Here are a few links to the documentation:

Build Instructions: http://w8bh.net/MorseTutor9.pdf

Bruce


johnbahun@...
 

Bruce:

Your work is fantastic.  The build time is much shorter.  Your software enhancements are excellent.  Keep up the great work!

73 John

--
John Bahun
Troy Ohio
Retired Software/Hardware Engineer
Retired from Apple Inc. Cupertino
N6API - Extra Class Since 03-05-2019
CFO #046 on official “Rooster”!
I specialize in Firmware and Drivers


Glenn
 

An 'enhancement' to the MCT might be the ability to copy CW off-air.  The ESP32 version may lend itself it self better to this.

While the purpose of the MCT really is to teach CW I know, the added ability to decode CW off-air seems like a useful idea to me. 

vk3pe


jjpurdum
 

I thought about that, but no decoder is perfect. Even on W1AW practice sessions, things make it less than 100% copy. I may try it after my new Projects book is done. The new book does use the ESP32, STM32, and Teensy in it. We just finished the DSP Post Processor, which looks like this:

Inline image

and uses the Teensy 3.6. (The more complex projects will have a PCB for sale at reasonable cost.) With the additional horsepower these bring to the table, perhaps we can do a better decoding job.

Jack, W8TEE

On Monday, October 28, 2019, 6:38:46 PM EDT, Glenn <glennp@...> wrote:


An 'enhancement' to the MCT might be the ability to copy CW off-air.  The ESP32 version may lend itself it self better to this.

While the purpose of the MCT really is to teach CW I know, the added ability to decode CW off-air seems like a useful idea to me. 

vk3pe


Glenn
 

Thanks Jack,  I was hoping DSP techniques these days might be able to improve CW decode to some degree.

It's nice to build the MCT but after hopefully learning and using CW, just thought rather than have the MCT 'no longer needed' you might say, an additional on air function would extend its life.
I guess the purists will say once you used it to learn, then decode is no longer needed !

glenn
vk3pe


jjpurdum
 

No, the decoder would still be useful as a learning tool, too. Han's decoder works about as good as any I've seen, but the faster processing speeds might make a different approach to the problem possible.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, October 29, 2019, 2:07:37 AM EDT, Glenn <glennp@...> wrote:


Thanks Jack,  I was hoping DSP techniques these days might be able to improve CW decode to some degree.

It's nice to build the MCT but after hopefully learning and using CW, just thought rather than have the MCT 'no longer needed' you might say, an additional on air function would extend its life.
I guess the purists will say once you used it to learn, then decode is no longer needed !

glenn
vk3pe


bobolink <rwhinric@...>
 

The Morserino-32 is open and has a decoder (esp32), among many other things.
I’ve been meaning to look at the algorithm but haven’t gotten around to it.
wm6h

Morserino-32


Paulo Borensztein
 

Could you make the schematic of this latest version available?


Gwen Patton
 

I just built a Morserino-32 last week. It's an amazing little device. It's a fun and fairly simple build, the SMD components are pre-soldered, and the feature set is impressive. Worth a look.


On Tue, Oct 29, 2019, 10:18 AM bobolink <rwhinric@...> wrote:
The Morserino-32 is open and has a decoder (esp32), among many other things.
I’ve been meaning to look at the algorithm but haven’t gotten around to it.
wm6h

Morserino-32


jjpurdum
 

That's interesting, Gwen. What features does $100 buy that makes it worth that much more than the $20 Morse Code Tutor?

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, October 29, 2019, 11:30:17 AM EDT, Gwen Patton <ardrhi@...> wrote:


I just built a Morserino-32 last week. It's an amazing little device. It's a fun and fairly simple build, the SMD components are pre-soldered, and the feature set is impressive. Worth a look.

On Tue, Oct 29, 2019, 10:18 AM bobolink <rwhinric@...> wrote:
The Morserino-32 is open and has a decoder (esp32), among many other things.
I’ve been meaning to look at the algorithm but haven’t gotten around to it.
wm6h

Morserino-32


jjpurdum
 

You need to be more specific as there are about 4 clones out there now.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, October 29, 2019, 11:20:13 AM EDT, Paulo Borensztein <benjami@...> wrote:


Could you make the schematic of this latest version available?


Gwen Patton
 

Didn't mean to ruffle your feathers, Jack. I like to build kits. I will build your tutor when I get all the parts together. The tutor part of yours, in the software, might have some better features, but this thing is pretty nice. Mine came with a laser-engraved acrylic enclosure. It has a built-in set of touch-sensitive paddles, or you can plug in your own. It also lets multiple owners of the device sent code to one another via the LoRa transceiver in the ESP32 they used. 

It has support built in to work as an oscillator for sending MCW into your computer for use with iCW, or, as I use it, to send code to my classmates in CW Academy. I was using a cheap eBay keyer, that suffered from sporadic latency that would mess up my sending. The Morserino doesn't do that, which makes it a lot easier in my classes. I'm sure your tutor could be made to do that, too, but I'd have to figure out how and add the components. With this, I just plug in a cable if I want to use the touch paddles, or two cables if I want to use my own paddles. The support is already there.

What I posted wasn't meant to be a comparison with yours, just an agreement with the previous poster who mentioned it, since I'd already built one.


On Tue, Oct 29, 2019 at 12:27 PM jjpurdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
That's interesting, Gwen. What features does $100 buy that makes it worth that much more than the $20 Morse Code Tutor?

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, October 29, 2019, 11:30:17 AM EDT, Gwen Patton <ardrhi@...> wrote:


I just built a Morserino-32 last week. It's an amazing little device. It's a fun and fairly simple build, the SMD components are pre-soldered, and the feature set is impressive. Worth a look.

On Tue, Oct 29, 2019, 10:18 AM bobolink <rwhinric@...> wrote:
The Morserino-32 is open and has a decoder (esp32), among many other things.
I’ve been meaning to look at the algorithm but haven’t gotten around to it.
wm6h

Morserino-32



--

-+-+-+-+-
Jenny Everywhere's Infinite: Quark Time
http://quarktime.net


jjpurdum
 

Hi Gwen:

I'm so old I don't have any feathers left to ruffle. Besides, there are 4 other boards out there that derived from my MCT, and I have absolutely no problem with that. Indeed, that's why all my stuff is Open Source...it let's everyone improve upon what you've already done rather than starting at ground zero. It was a sincere question in that someone on a lawn mowing budget should know the difference that $80 is buying. To some, it will be well worth it; to others, not so much. Transferring the code to the ESP32 which has Bluetooth and Wifi built in might be a good idea. Adding capacitive touch key pads is easy to do and is documented in my Arduino Projects book. This is a complete keyer from the book:

Inline image
 and uses solder lugs for the capacitive touch paddles. It uses a DigiSpark board (ATTiny85) and that "wart" on the board is a sidetone buzzer. It's pretty portable!

Anyway, some of the other features mentioned could easily be added in software, and I think some of my clones have added additional features, some of which I suggested at my FDIM talk when I presented it. No...expanding and sharing what you've done with others is almost always a good thing.

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, October 29, 2019, 12:40:10 PM EDT, Gwen Patton <ardrhi@...> wrote:


Didn't mean to ruffle your feathers, Jack. I like to build kits. I will build your tutor when I get all the parts together. The tutor part of yours, in the software, might have some better features, but this thing is pretty nice. Mine came with a laser-engraved acrylic enclosure. It has a built-in set of touch-sensitive paddles, or you can plug in your own. It also lets multiple owners of the device sent code to one another via the LoRa transceiver in the ESP32 they used. 

It has support built in to work as an oscillator for sending MCW into your computer for use with iCW, or, as I use it, to send code to my classmates in CW Academy. I was using a cheap eBay keyer, that suffered from sporadic latency that would mess up my sending. The Morserino doesn't do that, which makes it a lot easier in my classes. I'm sure your tutor could be made to do that, too, but I'd have to figure out how and add the components. With this, I just plug in a cable if I want to use the touch paddles, or two cables if I want to use my own paddles. The support is already there.

What I posted wasn't meant to be a comparison with yours, just an agreement with the previous poster who mentioned it, since I'd already built one.

On Tue, Oct 29, 2019 at 12:27 PM jjpurdum via Groups.Io <jjpurdum=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
That's interesting, Gwen. What features does $100 buy that makes it worth that much more than the $20 Morse Code Tutor?

Jack, W8TEE

On Tuesday, October 29, 2019, 11:30:17 AM EDT, Gwen Patton <ardrhi@...> wrote:


I just built a Morserino-32 last week. It's an amazing little device. It's a fun and fairly simple build, the SMD components are pre-soldered, and the feature set is impressive. Worth a look.

On Tue, Oct 29, 2019, 10:18 AM bobolink <rwhinric@...> wrote:
The Morserino-32 is open and has a decoder (esp32), among many other things.
I’ve been meaning to look at the algorithm but haven’t gotten around to it.
wm6h

Morserino-32



--

-+-+-+-+-
Jenny Everywhere's Infinite: Quark Time
http://quarktime.net