Voltage for Servo Controller II: 12V or 24V?


Frank
 

Commonly available 'in the field' is a 12V power supply. But using two batteries does make 24V possible. Does it have any advantages using 24V instead of 12V for operation of a Servo Controller II (with 24V drive motors instead of 12V drive motors)?


Don W
 

Hi Frank,

The advantage of 24 vdc operation is more power (more torque o move more mass).  The servos that SiTech sells are actually rated for 19 volts, but are very usable at 12 volts.  Running these (or any 12 volt servos) at 24 volts gives more torque with higher amperage.  The Servo I controller can handle about 2.4 amps while the Servo II can handle over 4 amps.

Running 12 volt servos at 24 volts is possible with SiTech safely since Servo Config can be set to 50% power output to allow 24 volts on 12 volt servos.  You casn run the SiTech 19 volt servos at 24 volts safely setting the power output to 70%.

If your system is working fine at 12 volts there is no big advantage to higher voltage other than much more voltage over the cut-off voltage.  A 12 volt battery system operates between about 14.5 volts and 11.5 volts.  The SiTech controllers stop working below about 11.5 volts.  So running at higher voltages gives you much more cushion over the minimum voltage.

I personally run my SiTech at 15 volts using a voltage booster (about $18 from China) to keep well above the cut-off voltage.

Don W

Don W


Mark Volle
 

I don’t know if it brought advantages but I chose (because they were available surplus) 24vdc servo motors… so I went with a dc-dc converter and still run the rig from a nominal 12v source. The converter has a wide input voltage range (9-18) and always produces exactly 24 out- seems to be working fine for several years.


On Nov 28, 2021, at 03:30, Frank <fclbhol@...> wrote:

Commonly available 'in the field' is a 12V power supply. But using two batteries does make 24V possible. Does it have any advantages using 24V instead of 12V for operation of a Servo Controller II (with 24V drive motors instead of 12V drive motors)?


Dan Hummel
 

Another option would be to use three 6 volt batterys. That gives 18 volts for the servos and you can still tap off 12 volts for other equipment.



Dan Gray
 

Hi Frank,
They'll have the same amount of torque with a 12 volt supply, but will not move as fast as if you had a 24 volt supply.  You can look at the rpm of the motor, if it's a 24 volt motor with 3000 rpm, you would only be able to go 1500 RPM  with 12 volts.
Dan


On Sun, Nov 28, 2021 at 1:13 PM Mark Volle <mark.d.volle@...> wrote:
I don’t know if it brought advantages but I chose (because they were available surplus) 24vdc servo motors… so I went with a dc-dc converter and still run the rig from a nominal 12v source. The converter has a wide input voltage range (9-18) and always produces exactly 24 out- seems to be working fine for several years.


On Nov 28, 2021, at 03:30, Frank <fclbhol@...> wrote:

Commonly available 'in the field' is a 12V power supply. But using two batteries does make 24V possible. Does it have any advantages using 24V instead of 12V for operation of a Servo Controller II (with 24V drive motors instead of 12V drive motors)?