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Pilot couplers

John Short
 

Good morning!

I am in the process of converting my HOn3 rolling stock from Kadee 714 couplers to the new Sergent Engineering Sharon couplers.  Has anyone found a problem with using these diecast couplers on the front pilot of Blackstone locomotives?  I am specifically concerned about a short-circuit when double-heading.  So far, I have seen no negative information regarding this.

By the way, these Sharon couplers are a very easy installation into the Blackstone cars!  Very impressive product!

Thanks in advance for any information that people may provide.

John Short

jzook@...
 

Hi John,


I have converted one of my Blackstone's to Sharon couplers on the pilot and the tender.  The locomotive I chose was my K-27 #459, which I also did a snowplow conversion on.  I've had no problems running double headers with this locomotive.  I believe the pilot and tender coupler boxes are isolated from the frame, so this shouldn't be a problem.  BTW, the Sharon looks awesome with the snow plow!  Very prototypical in appearance.  I did have to file down the underside of the plow so the coupler could move side to side more freely.


Jon

Dale Buxton
 

If you put the Sharon's that you mount on the brass tenders end beam in an old Kadee 714 coupler box, the pilot of the second brass engine behind it will NEVER have any through the train shorting out issues. This same fix holds true for any of the all metal (brass) rolling stock that you own. Put those Sharon's in your old Kadee 714 coupler boxes and you will never have any through the car shorting problems. NEVER!


Dale Buxton

The RGS nut

Dale Buxton
 

As a side note here. On D&RG narrow gauge locomotives the couplers did not extend over the pilot cages prow. Meaning, that it was impossible to couple these locomotives pilot to pilot. The pilot prows would strike each other before the coupler knuckles got anywhere near each other. And the only place you will find two locomotives in a train facing opposite directions is in rotary plow trains. But even then, there was a car or caboose between these engines.

Dale Buxton