Date   
Re: [SergentEng] We got trouble in River City.

Rob Barker
 

Just curious here as I've had success getting 'sticky' ball bearings to move by tapping the knuckle with the magnet.   It does sound like yours are a bit more then just sticky...  have you tried tapping them?

On Mon, Jun 29, 2015 at 12:00 PM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 

Jerry, yes, I have an ultrasonic cleaner, and I would never have thought of that.

Terrific idea.  I'll give it a shot, tomorrow, and report back.
I might be able to rig up some kind of fixture so I don't even have to take the couplers off the car.  Who knows?
Thanks,
Mike
On Jun 28, 2015, at 6:51 PM, 'jerry via FMW.com' jerrykitts@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Hello Mike,


If you have access to a ultrasonic cleaner it might just remove your corrosion. I had a few couplers that I put lubricant in which only gummed things up. I put the couplers that needed cleaning on a rod so they hung knuckle down so that the ultrasonic cleaner as it cleaned the lubricant out gravity also lowered anything in the coupler down and out of the inside of the coupler. 

You could do several couplers at a time and not have to disassemble them.

Jerry Kitts

On Jun 28, 2015, at 2:35 PM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Hi:


My original message to Frank at Sergent Engineering, (He suggested I share this problem with you):

I built a bunch of your HO Standard Gauge couplers about a year ago.  I did all the steps as the instructions said and made sure each coupler was given the "Break in"  They all seemed to work just fine.  Then, due to surgery on my foot, I didn't operate the RailRoad all winter.  When I finally got started again, about half of the couplers won't work.  It's almost like they are glued shut.  Is it possible the ACC has migrated to close up the knuckles?  I used as small an amount as possible and, as I said, they all worked just fine, until they sat over the winter.
 
I've tried to put a drop of Liquid Wrench in the opening.  No help.
 
I've squirted a puff of powdered graphite in.  No help.
 
I've tried a small drop of NeoLube.  No help.
 
Only thing that has worked is to disassemble and reassemble the coupler.  That works.  Sort of a pain in the rear to have to do that on half of a 100 car fleet.  VBG
 
Any ideas?
 
I really don't want to redo the entire fleet.  Well, half of the entire fleet.
 
They worked so well before I stopped using them in November.
 
Thanks for any helpful suggestions.

Mike Van Hove

Jerry Kitts
Foothill Model Works
Visit our web site at






Re: [SergentEng] We got trouble in River City.

Nathan Rich
 

Would not the ultrasonic tank eat the CA out of the coupler? 

I've had the occasional sticky coupler but it was usually remedied by a light tap to free the ball, then making sure it was worked through a few hooks and cuts to make sure it was not a bad coupler.

Nathan Rich


On Sunday, June 28, 2015, Rob Barker robkbarker@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 

Just curious here as I've had success getting 'sticky' ball bearings to move by tapping the knuckle with the magnet.   It does sound like yours are a bit more then just sticky...  have you tried tapping them?

On Mon, Jun 29, 2015 at 12:00 PM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 

Jerry, yes, I have an ultrasonic cleaner, and I would never have thought of that.

Terrific idea.  I'll give it a shot, tomorrow, and report back.
I might be able to rig up some kind of fixture so I don't even have to take the couplers off the car.  Who knows?
Thanks,
Mike
On Jun 28, 2015, at 6:51 PM, 'jerry via FMW.com' jerrykitts@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Hello Mike,


If you have access to a ultrasonic cleaner it might just remove your corrosion. I had a few couplers that I put lubricant in which only gummed things up. I put the couplers that needed cleaning on a rod so they hung knuckle down so that the ultrasonic cleaner as it cleaned the lubricant out gravity also lowered anything in the coupler down and out of the inside of the coupler. 

You could do several couplers at a time and not have to disassemble them.

Jerry Kitts

On Jun 28, 2015, at 2:35 PM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Hi:


My original message to Frank at Sergent Engineering, (He suggested I share this problem with you):

I built a bunch of your HO Standard Gauge couplers about a year ago.  I did all the steps as the instructions said and made sure each coupler was given the "Break in"  They all seemed to work just fine.  Then, due to surgery on my foot, I didn't operate the RailRoad all winter.  When I finally got started again, about half of the couplers won't work.  It's almost like they are glued shut.  Is it possible the ACC has migrated to close up the knuckles?  I used as small an amount as possible and, as I said, they all worked just fine, until they sat over the winter.
 
I've tried to put a drop of Liquid Wrench in the opening.  No help.
 
I've squirted a puff of powdered graphite in.  No help.
 
I've tried a small drop of NeoLube.  No help.
 
Only thing that has worked is to disassemble and reassemble the coupler.  That works.  Sort of a pain in the rear to have to do that on half of a 100 car fleet.  VBG
 
Any ideas?
 
I really don't want to redo the entire fleet.  Well, half of the entire fleet.
 
They worked so well before I stopped using them in November.
 
Thanks for any helpful suggestions.

Mike Van Hove

Jerry Kitts
Foothill Model Works
Visit our web site at






Re: [SergentEng] We got trouble in River City.

Mike Van Hove
 

Rob,
Yes, I have tapped and tapped, even to the point of being afraid to tap any harder, for fear of damaging the coupler.
I know, it seems hard to believe they could get that stuck, but they are.
Some do come loose after some tapping, but most do not.
Thanks for the suggestion,
Mike

On Jun 28, 2015, at 11:10 PM, Rob Barker robkbarker@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Just curious here as I've had success getting 'sticky' ball bearings to move by tapping the knuckle with the magnet.   It does sound like yours are a bit more then just sticky...  have you tried tapping them?

On Mon, Jun 29, 2015 at 12:00 PM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 

Jerry, yes, I have an ultrasonic cleaner, and I would never have thought of that.

Terrific idea.  I'll give it a shot, tomorrow, and report back.
I might be able to rig up some kind of fixture so I don't even have to take the couplers off the car.  Who knows?
Thanks,
Mike
On Jun 28, 2015, at 6:51 PM, 'jerry via FMW.com' jerrykitts@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Hello Mike,


If you have access to a ultrasonic cleaner it might just remove your corrosion. I had a few couplers that I put lubricant in which only gummed things up. I put the couplers that needed cleaning on a rod so they hung knuckle down so that the ultrasonic cleaner as it cleaned the lubricant out gravity also lowered anything in the coupler down and out of the inside of the coupler. 

You could do several couplers at a time and not have to disassemble them.

Jerry Kitts

On Jun 28, 2015, at 2:35 PM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Hi:


My original message to Frank at Sergent Engineering, (He suggested I share this problem with you):

I built a bunch of your HO Standard Gauge couplers about a year ago.  I did all the steps as the instructions said and made sure each coupler was given the "Break in"  They all seemed to work just fine.  Then, due to surgery on my foot, I didn't operate the RailRoad all winter.  When I finally got started again, about half of the couplers won't work.  It's almost like they are glued shut.  Is it possible the ACC has migrated to close up the knuckles?  I used as small an amount as possible and, as I said, they all worked just fine, until they sat over the winter.
 
I've tried to put a drop of Liquid Wrench in the opening.  No help.
 
I've squirted a puff of powdered graphite in.  No help.
 
I've tried a small drop of NeoLube.  No help.
 
Only thing that has worked is to disassemble and reassemble the coupler.  That works.  Sort of a pain in the rear to have to do that on half of a 100 car fleet.  VBG
 
Any ideas?
 
I really don't want to redo the entire fleet.  Well, half of the entire fleet.
 
They worked so well before I stopped using them in November.
 
Thanks for any helpful suggestions.

Mike Van Hove

Jerry Kitts
Foothill Model Works
Visit our web site at









Re: [SergentEng] We got trouble in River City.

Mike Van Hove
 

Nathan,
I have had the same thought.  That's why I am going to try 2 or 3 couplers, before committing to mass "Ultrasonicing" if there is such a word.

I have a Dr appointment this morning, but will jump on the coupler problem as soon as I get back.

Thanks,
Mike

On Jun 29, 2015, at 7:33 AM, Nathan Rich thaddeusthudpucker@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Would not the ultrasonic tank eat the CA out of the coupler? 


I've had the occasional sticky coupler but it was usually remedied by a light tap to free the ball, then making sure it was worked through a few hooks and cuts to make sure it was not a bad coupler.

Nathan Rich

On Sunday, June 28, 2015, Rob Barker robkbarker@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 

Just curious here as I've had success getting 'sticky' ball bearings to move by tapping the knuckle with the magnet.   It does sound like yours are a bit more then just sticky...  have you tried tapping them?

On Mon, Jun 29, 2015 at 12:00 PM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 

Jerry, yes, I have an ultrasonic cleaner, and I would never have thought of that.

Terrific idea.  I'll give it a shot, tomorrow, and report back.
I might be able to rig up some kind of fixture so I don't even have to take the couplers off the car.  Who knows?
Thanks,
Mike
On Jun 28, 2015, at 6:51 PM, 'jerry via FMW.com' jerrykitts@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Hello Mike,


If you have access to a ultrasonic cleaner it might just remove your corrosion. I had a few couplers that I put lubricant in which only gummed things up. I put the couplers that needed cleaning on a rod so they hung knuckle down so that the ultrasonic cleaner as it cleaned the lubricant out gravity also lowered anything in the coupler down and out of the inside of the coupler. 

You could do several couplers at a time and not have to disassemble them.

Jerry Kitts

On Jun 28, 2015, at 2:35 PM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Hi:


My original message to Frank at Sergent Engineering, (He suggested I share this problem with you):

I built a bunch of your HO Standard Gauge couplers about a year ago.  I did all the steps as the instructions said and made sure each coupler was given the "Break in"  They all seemed to work just fine.  Then, due to surgery on my foot, I didn't operate the RailRoad all winter.  When I finally got started again, about half of the couplers won't work.  It's almost like they are glued shut.  Is it possible the ACC has migrated to close up the knuckles?  I used as small an amount as possible and, as I said, they all worked just fine, until they sat over the winter.
 
I've tried to put a drop of Liquid Wrench in the opening.  No help.
 
I've squirted a puff of powdered graphite in.  No help.
 
I've tried a small drop of NeoLube.  No help.
 
Only thing that has worked is to disassemble and reassemble the coupler.  That works.  Sort of a pain in the rear to have to do that on half of a 100 car fleet.  VBG
 
Any ideas?
 
I really don't want to redo the entire fleet.  Well, half of the entire fleet.
 
They worked so well before I stopped using them in November.
 
Thanks for any helpful suggestions.

Mike Van Hove

Jerry Kitts
Foothill Model Works
Visit our web site at










We've got trouble in River City

Mike Van Hove
 

Hello to all who have responded.

Yesterday evening, I tried the Ultrasonic Cleaner. About a 50% success rate, but the trouble is, the ACC does get loosened.

I had put the couplers in a very fine Tea Strainer, which was fortunate, as some of the couplers came apart.

I think, I will just Ultrasonic the stuck couplers, and disassemble them and start over.

I will be very careful to check for burrs (I thought I had done this the first time).

I'm also only going to put ACC on the long flat area where the top and bottom come together. The place where the "Rivet" is. I may stake the rivet as well.

If the ACC was in any way responsible for the stickiness, this way, there is no way it can get into the Ball Channel.

There is a definate light coating of whitish looking powder or dust on the affected couplers.

This is not on all the couplers. Hmmm?

The train room is in a separate building, from my house. It is very well insulated. However, it does not have a normal heating system. When I'm out there working, I keep a fire in a small wood stove.

When I'm not out there, in cold weather, I leave a small electric heater on. Being a Tightwad, I only try to keep it about 45-50 F. I hate to run the electric bill for it can get a bit pricey.

Only reason I keep the heater on is because of the water based paints, glues, etc. Don't want them freezing.

Maybe, the couplers are getting cold and moisture is condensing on them? I don't have any problem with my machine tools and hand tools rusting, so this doesn't seem like the answer.

I'm at a loss as to the "why", but I guess I just have to bite the bullet, and go through the cars, one by one, and rework the affected couplers. Doesn't seem to be any pattern. Many cars are okay, many have only

one coupler bound up, the other end functioning just fine. Go figure!

Oh well, as someone once said, "Model Railroading is Fun".

Phooie!

Thanks for all who have responded.

Mike Van Hove

Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

Alan Hummel
 

Mike:
I have the same problem with heat in the basement paying the electric bill to heat it. I have heat ducts all I have to do is open them. Added onto that,I have cracks in the floor that in Spring & Summer or after a torrential rain I get water in the cracks which lasts about 2days.

So am I facing the same problem? I only have a few couplers installed so far,but am hesitant to start a big project of installing couplers hearing about your difficulties. I buy my couplers rtr as my fingures are too nimble & eyesight is getting bad.

Hope there's another solution than taking couplers apart.

Will continue to follow this subject.

Al Hummel



On Tuesday, June 30, 2015 10:04 AM, "Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng]" wrote:


 
Hello to all who have responded.

Yesterday evening, I tried the Ultrasonic Cleaner. About a 50% success rate, but the trouble is, the ACC does get loosened.

I had put the couplers in a very fine Tea Strainer, which was fortunate, as some of the couplers came apart.

I think, I will just Ultrasonic the stuck couplers, and disassemble them and start over.

I will be very careful to check for burrs (I thought I had done this the first time).

I'm also only going to put ACC on the long flat area where the top and bottom come together. The place where the "Rivet" is. I may stake the rivet as well.

If the ACC was in any way responsible for the stickiness, this way, there is no way it can get into the Ball Channel.

There is a definate light coating of whitish looking powder or dust on the affected couplers.

This is not on all the couplers. Hmmm?

The train room is in a separate building, from my house. It is very well insulated. However, it does not have a normal heating system. When I'm out there working, I keep a fire in a small wood stove.

When I'm not out there, in cold weather, I leave a small electric heater on. Being a Tightwad, I only try to keep it about 45-50 F. I hate to run the electric bill for it can get a bit pricey.

Only reason I keep the heater on is because of the water based paints, glues, etc. Don't want them freezing.

Maybe, the couplers are getting cold and moisture is condensing on them? I don't have any problem with my machine tools and hand tools rusting, so this doesn't seem like the answer.

I'm at a loss as to the "why", but I guess I just have to bite the bullet, and go through the cars, one by one, and rework the affected couplers. Doesn't seem to be any pattern. Many cars are okay, many have only

one coupler bound up, the other end functioning just fine. Go figure!

Oh well, as someone once said, "Model Railroading is Fun".

Phooie!

Thanks for all who have responded.

Mike Van Hove


Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

Mike Van Hove
 

Al, ( and everyone else),
I have no proof that the temp in the work shop/Train Room is causing this, but it could be.

This afternoon, I dug out a box of HO Std Gage Sergent Couplers, I had assembled, early last fall.  They had all been tested and rubbed together to break them in, as per the instructions.  They all worked fine, at that time, or I kept messing with them until they did.

They have been in this tight fitting box ever since last fall.  When I opened the box, I could immediately see a coating of white powder, on the fixed jaw and the movable jaw of the coupler.  A fairly heavy coating.

I also noticed that in nearly every case, (there are over 50 couplers in the box) I could see the ball move from top to bottom with the magnet.  However, the Knuckle is stuck in the closed position.  I can invert the coupler (same as picking up the ball with the Magnet) and then pry the coupler open with my thumbnail, in most cases.  After that, I can worry the knuckle back and forth and eventually, the coupler works just fine.
Takes about 4 minutes to do each one.  Pain in the ass, in my opinion.
Once I have done all this, I can put the coupler close to another and couple and uncouple with the Sergent wand.
Now, if this is a one time deal, I guess I can live with it, but heaven help me if it happens again.  I was going to sell all the Kaddee Couplers I had taken off, but now, I think I better hang on to them, just in case.

I know there are many folks out there who are using these couplers quite satisfactorily.  No one else seems to have had this problem.  I have to wonder if I have something that's causing this Powder to appear, or if there was a bad batch of diecast material.  It seems strange that only some of the couplers are affected.  If it was an environmental issue, in my shop, you would think they all would be affected.  The couplers I have were bought in several different batches, which might explain why some are and some aren't affected.

I have tried to take a picture of this caoting, but I just can't seem to focus in close enough to really see the detail.

Anybody got any more ideas, I'm all ears.

Thanks,
Mike Van Hove


On Jun 30, 2015, at 3:31 PM, Alan Hummel ahummel72@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Mike:
I have the same problem with heat in the basement paying the electric bill to heat it. I have heat ducts all I have to do is open them. Added onto that,I have cracks in the floor that in Spring & Summer or after a torrential rain I get water in the cracks which lasts about 2days.

So am I facing the same problem? I only have a few couplers installed so far,but am hesitant to start a big project of installing couplers hearing about your difficulties. I buy my couplers rtr as my fingures are too nimble & eyesight is getting bad.

Hope there's another solution than taking couplers apart.

Will continue to follow this subject.

Al Hummel



On Tuesday, June 30, 2015 10:04 AM, "Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng]" <SergentEng@...> wrote:


 
Hello to all who have responded.

Yesterday evening, I tried the Ultrasonic Cleaner. About a 50% success rate, but the trouble is, the ACC does get loosened.

I had put the couplers in a very fine Tea Strainer, which was fortunate, as some of the couplers came apart.

I think, I will just Ultrasonic the stuck couplers, and disassemble them and start over.

I will be very careful to check for burrs (I thought I had done this the first time).

I'm also only going to put ACC on the long flat area where the top and bottom come together. The place where the "Rivet" is. I may stake the rivet as well.

If the ACC was in any way responsible for the stickiness, this way, there is no way it can get into the Ball Channel.

There is a definate light coating of whitish looking powder or dust on the affected couplers.

This is not on all the couplers. Hmmm?

The train room is in a separate building, from my house. It is very well insulated. However, it does not have a normal heating system. When I'm out there working, I keep a fire in a small wood stove.

When I'm not out there, in cold weather, I leave a small electric heater on. Being a Tightwad, I only try to keep it about 45-50 F. I hate to run the electric bill for it can get a bit pricey.

Only reason I keep the heater on is because of the water based paints, glues, etc. Don't want them freezing.

Maybe, the couplers are getting cold and moisture is condensing on them? I don't have any problem with my machine tools and hand tools rusting, so this doesn't seem like the answer.

I'm at a loss as to the "why", but I guess I just have to bite the bullet, and go through the cars, one by one, and rework the affected couplers. Doesn't seem to be any pattern. Many cars are okay, many have only

one coupler bound up, the other end functioning just fine. Go figure!

Oh well, as someone once said, "Model Railroading is Fun".

Phooie!

Thanks for all who have responded.

Mike Van Hove




Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

Luther Brefo
 

White coating is some sort of oxide, depending on what metal the couplers are made of that would very well explain your dilemma. I see this on automotive parts made from aluminum.

On Jun 30, 2015 22:02, "Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng]" <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 

Al, ( and everyone else),

I have no proof that the temp in the work shop/Train Room is causing this, but it could be.

This afternoon, I dug out a box of HO Std Gage Sergent Couplers, I had assembled, early last fall.  They had all been tested and rubbed together to break them in, as per the instructions.  They all worked fine, at that time, or I kept messing with them until they did.

They have been in this tight fitting box ever since last fall.  When I opened the box, I could immediately see a coating of white powder, on the fixed jaw and the movable jaw of the coupler.  A fairly heavy coating.

I also noticed that in nearly every case, (there are over 50 couplers in the box) I could see the ball move from top to bottom with the magnet.  However, the Knuckle is stuck in the closed position.  I can invert the coupler (same as picking up the ball with the Magnet) and then pry the coupler open with my thumbnail, in most cases.  After that, I can worry the knuckle back and forth and eventually, the coupler works just fine.
Takes about 4 minutes to do each one.  Pain in the ass, in my opinion.
Once I have done all this, I can put the coupler close to another and couple and uncouple with the Sergent wand.
Now, if this is a one time deal, I guess I can live with it, but heaven help me if it happens again.  I was going to sell all the Kaddee Couplers I had taken off, but now, I think I better hang on to them, just in case.

I know there are many folks out there who are using these couplers quite satisfactorily.  No one else seems to have had this problem.  I have to wonder if I have something that's causing this Powder to appear, or if there was a bad batch of diecast material.  It seems strange that only some of the couplers are affected.  If it was an environmental issue, in my shop, you would think they all would be affected.  The couplers I have were bought in several different batches, which might explain why some are and some aren't affected.

I have tried to take a picture of this caoting, but I just can't seem to focus in close enough to really see the detail.

Anybody got any more ideas, I'm all ears.

Thanks,
Mike Van Hove


On Jun 30, 2015, at 3:31 PM, Alan Hummel ahummel72@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Mike:
I have the same problem with heat in the basement paying the electric bill to heat it. I have heat ducts all I have to do is open them. Added onto that,I have cracks in the floor that in Spring & Summer or after a torrential rain I get water in the cracks which lasts about 2days.

So am I facing the same problem? I only have a few couplers installed so far,but am hesitant to start a big project of installing couplers hearing about your difficulties. I buy my couplers rtr as my fingures are too nimble & eyesight is getting bad.

Hope there's another solution than taking couplers apart.

Will continue to follow this subject.

Al Hummel



On Tuesday, June 30, 2015 10:04 AM, "Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng]" <SergentEng@...> wrote:


 
Hello to all who have responded.

Yesterday evening, I tried the Ultrasonic Cleaner. About a 50% success rate, but the trouble is, the ACC does get loosened.

I had put the couplers in a very fine Tea Strainer, which was fortunate, as some of the couplers came apart.

I think, I will just Ultrasonic the stuck couplers, and disassemble them and start over.

I will be very careful to check for burrs (I thought I had done this the first time).

I'm also only going to put ACC on the long flat area where the top and bottom come together. The place where the "Rivet" is. I may stake the rivet as well.

If the ACC was in any way responsible for the stickiness, this way, there is no way it can get into the Ball Channel.

There is a definate light coating of whitish looking powder or dust on the affected couplers.

This is not on all the couplers. Hmmm?

The train room is in a separate building, from my house. It is very well insulated. However, it does not have a normal heating system. When I'm out there working, I keep a fire in a small wood stove.

When I'm not out there, in cold weather, I leave a small electric heater on. Being a Tightwad, I only try to keep it about 45-50 F. I hate to run the electric bill for it can get a bit pricey.

Only reason I keep the heater on is because of the water based paints, glues, etc. Don't want them freezing.

Maybe, the couplers are getting cold and moisture is condensing on them? I don't have any problem with my machine tools and hand tools rusting, so this doesn't seem like the answer.

I'm at a loss as to the "why", but I guess I just have to bite the bullet, and go through the cars, one by one, and rework the affected couplers. Doesn't seem to be any pattern. Many cars are okay, many have only

one coupler bound up, the other end functioning just fine. Go figure!

Oh well, as someone once said, "Model Railroading is Fun".

Phooie!

Thanks for all who have responded.

Mike Van Hove




Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

Mike Conder
 

Mike, did you paint your couplers before assembly, or assemble them without painting?

Mike Conder

Re: [SergentEng] We got trouble in River City.

Tim L
 

Stuck couplers after periods of storage isn't un-prototypical :-)

Actually I have had the same problem with newly assembled couplers;
assemble them, break them in (all works fine), come back a few
days later and they are stuck requiring a strong magnet or the flick
(sometimes very hard) of the finger to loosen them. I am at a bit of
a loss to explain why, except that it's winter and quite cold here.

As to the white powder, that indeed is oxidisation, aka rust. The castings are made of Zinc, and the oxide of Zinc is a white powder.
Why you should be getting oxidation that bad I don't know. I wonder if
there could be an impurity in the metal. The only other thing I can
think of is electrolysis (two different metals in contact with each
other can cause corrosion, the casting being Zinc and the metal ball
being Stainless steel?) but I can't imagine it would become that bad
and I think moisture has to be present too for electrolysis to happen.
I think I have some research and reading to do.

Best to you all,

Tim

On 29/06/2015 07:35, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] wrote:
Hi:


My original message to Frank at Sergent Engineering, (He suggested I
share this problem with you):

I built a bunch of your HO Standard Gauge couplers about a year ago. I
did all the steps as the instructions said and made sure each coupler
was given the "Break in" They all seemed to work just fine. Then, due
to surgery on my foot, I didn't operate the RailRoad all winter. When I
finally got started again, about half of the couplers won't work. It's
almost like they are glued shut. Is it possible the ACC has migrated to
close up the knuckles? I used as small an amount as possible and, as I
said, they all worked just fine, until they sat over the winter.
I've tried to put a drop of Liquid Wrench in the opening. No help.
I've squirted a puff of powdered graphite in. No help.
I've tried a small drop of NeoLube. No help.
Only thing that has worked is to disassemble and reassemble the
coupler. That works. Sort of a pain in the rear to have to do that on
half of a 100 car fleet. VBG
Any ideas?
I really don't want to redo the entire fleet. Well, half of the entire
fleet.
They worked so well before I stopped using them in November.
Thanks for any helpful suggestions.

Mike Van Hove

Investment cast coupler update

Tim L
 

Hello all,

It's been a couple of months since the stuck couplers (ball problem)
came up so I shot Frank an eMail for an update and this is what he had
to say.

He has had some success with the SEC style couplers and *hopes* to have
them available again next week. I would say don't quote that as gospel
it will happen.

As for all the other couplers, mixed results so far. He is working
through everything, from design to materials to processes to see if
anything could be a factor.

Once things are solved, he will offer things pre assembled for a while.
I take this to mean no kits (remember, this is only the investment cast
couplers, diecast (bulk pack style) aren't affected) which makes sense,
as he has to assemble them he can be sure they will work when they go
out. I am sure Frank will return to kits when he's confident everything
has been worked out.

So thank you Frank for taking what is precious time, money and
resources to a small company to work things through instead of just
putting all those speciality investment cast couplers in the too hard
basket and only continuing with the standard diecast E.

Best to you all,

Tim

Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

Mike Van Hove
 

Mike, some were painted with acrylic craft paint, some were not painted at all.

I believe the painting was done after assembly.  The painting was done with very light, thin coats.  They were brush painted.  I did try to keep the paint on the outside of the couplers.

Some of the painted couplers have the white dust, some don't.  Most of the unpainted ones have the white dust.

I looked at them again, and I see that the painted ones have it on the face of the moveable knuckle and the inside of the fixed jaw, where the paint got rubbed off when I did the "Breaking in".

It would appear the white dust occurs where there is no paint.

Thanks,

another Mike


On Jul 1, 2015, at 1:20 AM, Mike Conder vulturenest1@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Mike, did you paint your couplers before assembly, or assemble them without painting?


Mike Conder


Re: [SergentEng] We got trouble in River City.

Mike Van Hove
 

Tim,

sounds like you have exactly the same situation that I have.

Glad to know I'm not the only one.

My main worry is, will they continue to become stuck, or will they stop, once the oxide is cleaned up and the couplers are made to work again?

Let's hope it's a one time deal.

Mike

On Jul 1, 2015, at 7:15 AM, TS egroupstuff@... [SergentEng] wrote:

Stuck couplers after periods of storage isn't un-prototypical :-)

Actually I have had the same problem with newly assembled couplers;
assemble them, break them in (all works fine), come back a few
days later and they are stuck requiring a strong magnet or the flick
(sometimes very hard) of the finger to loosen them. I am at a bit of
a loss to explain why, except that it's winter and quite cold here.

As to the white powder, that indeed is oxidisation, aka rust. The
castings are made of Zinc, and the oxide of Zinc is a white powder.
Why you should be getting oxidation that bad I don't know. I wonder if
there could be an impurity in the metal. The only other thing I can
think of is electrolysis (two different metals in contact with each
other can cause corrosion, the casting being Zinc and the metal ball
being Stainless steel?) but I can't imagine it would become that bad
and I think moisture has to be present too for electrolysis to happen.
I think I have some research and reading to do.

Best to you all,

Tim


On 29/06/2015 07:35, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng]
wrote:
Hi:


My original message to Frank at Sergent Engineering, (He suggested I
share this problem with you):

I built a bunch of your HO Standard Gauge couplers about a year ago. I
did all the steps as the instructions said and made sure each coupler
was given the "Break in" They all seemed to work just fine. Then, due
to surgery on my foot, I didn't operate the RailRoad all winter. When I
finally got started again, about half of the couplers won't work. It's
almost like they are glued shut. Is it possible the ACC has migrated to
close up the knuckles? I used as small an amount as possible and, as I
said, they all worked just fine, until they sat over the winter.
I've tried to put a drop of Liquid Wrench in the opening. No help.
I've squirted a puff of powdered graphite in. No help.
I've tried a small drop of NeoLube. No help.
Only thing that has worked is to disassemble and reassemble the
coupler. That works. Sort of a pain in the rear to have to do that on
half of a 100 car fleet. VBG
Any ideas?
I really don't want to redo the entire fleet. Well, half of the entire
fleet.
They worked so well before I stopped using them in November.
Thanks for any helpful suggestions.

Mike Van Hove

------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

Mike Conder
 

Interesting ...

I've been using the new Sharon couplers (I am a TOC narrow gauger) and the website now recommends using a solvent-based spray (Krylon?  I forget exactly).  Wonder if that would help prevent some of this.

It does sound like some sort of atmospheric corrosion, a bit unexpected.

Mike Conder

On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 8:06 AM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 

Mike, some were painted with acrylic craft paint, some were not painted at all.


I believe the painting was done after assembly.  The painting was done with very light, thin coats.  They were brush painted.  I did try to keep the paint on the outside of the couplers.

Some of the painted couplers have the white dust, some don't.  Most of the unpainted ones have the white dust.

I looked at them again, and I see that the painted ones have it on the face of the moveable knuckle and the inside of the fixed jaw, where the paint got rubbed off when I did the "Breaking in".

It would appear the white dust occurs where there is no paint.

Thanks,

another Mike


On Jul 1, 2015, at 1:20 AM, Mike Conder vulturenest1@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Mike, did you paint your couplers before assembly, or assemble them without painting?


Mike Conder



Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

Mike Van Hove
 

Mike,
Frank replied to an email I sent him, in which he said that Rustoleum might prevent the corrosion.

I have not tried this, as all the couplers I have are installed or at least, painted and in a box, waiting to be installed.  Those are the ones in the box that have the corrosion on the parts where the paint has been rubbed off.

I guess the Sharons that I have on order (I finally bit the bullet and i'm starting a new HOn3 layout) will have to be sprayed with Rustoleum.  Maybe that will be the "Miricle Cure".

I dug around and found Frank's message.

I copy it here, in his exact words:

"I don’t think the ACC will migrate over time. One thing that I imagine could happen is that corrosion could build up inside the coupler when not in use and that could keep the ball from lifting and falling properly. If you peer into a stuck coupler when you put the uncoupling wand over it... can you see the ball move up into the top casting? You can see this with a coupler that is operating properly (at least I can with good light and my reading glasses). If the ball doesn’t lift, then there might be corrosion build up in the ball cylinder on the top castings. Corrosion on the zinc castings will be in the form of a white powder on the surface that is typically very easy to remove. If you have a bigger magnet than the ones in the uncoupling wands, you can probably force the ball to come up. Then put the magnet on the bottom of the coupler to force it back down. Once you repeat this a few times the corrosion will be knocked of the critical surfaces as original operation will be restored. I haven’t actually seen this happen – even though I have tried to make it happen by purposely leaving couplers in damp locations for an extended period of time. If you are actually seeing this problem, then I would recommend this big magnet trick. I would also recommend coating the ball cylinder in the top casting and the ball seat in the bottom castings with Neolube prior to assembly (or reassembly as the cast may be). The Neolube is a great corrosion inhibitor. One of the reasons I recommend painting the couplers with Rustoleum is that it includes corrosion inhibitors. Even though the Rustoleum is only on the outside surface of the couplers, its ingredients act as a sacrificial electrode to prevent corrosion and that works for the whole part – not just the surface where the paint is applied. Please let me know what you find out and share with the Yahoo group. I’m certain those guys would be very interested in your findings.
 
Thanks,
Frank"


So, I guess I need Neolube inside, and Rustoleum on the outside.

Ain't it fun?

The other Mike





On Jul 1, 2015, at 9:58 AM, Mike Conder vulturenest1@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Interesting ...

I've been using the new Sharon couplers (I am a TOC narrow gauger) and the website now recommends using a solvent-based spray (Krylon?  I forget exactly).  Wonder if that would help prevent some of this.

It does sound like some sort of atmospheric corrosion, a bit unexpected.

Mike Conder

On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 8:06 AM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 

Mike, some were painted with acrylic craft paint, some were not painted at all.


I believe the painting was done after assembly.  The painting was done with very light, thin coats.  They were brush painted.  I did try to keep the paint on the outside of the couplers.

Some of the painted couplers have the white dust, some don't.  Most of the unpainted ones have the white dust.

I looked at them again, and I see that the painted ones have it on the face of the moveable knuckle and the inside of the fixed jaw, where the paint got rubbed off when I did the "Breaking in".

It would appear the white dust occurs where there is no paint.

Thanks,

another Mike


On Jul 1, 2015, at 1:20 AM, Mike Conder vulturenest1@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Mike, did you paint your couplers before assembly, or assemble them without painting?


Mike Conder






Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

Alan Hummel
 

The Other Mike,

Mike,since this is an investment casting product problem,should I assume the corrosion problem can occur even if the couplers come preassembled as mine do?

In Frank's letter,he mentioned a "stronger" magnet than the 1 sold for uncoupling-what type magnet would this be & where can I find them? All I have are refrigerator magnets & I don't think they're as strong as the uncoupling wand.(?)

Thank you,
Al Hummel




On Wednesday, July 1, 2015 11:46 AM, "Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng]" wrote:


 
Mike,
Frank replied to an email I sent him, in which he said that Rustoleum might prevent the corrosion.

I have not tried this, as all the couplers I have are installed or at least, painted and in a box, waiting to be installed.  Those are the ones in the box that have the corrosion on the parts where the paint has been rubbed off.

I guess the Sharons that I have on order (I finally bit the bullet and i'm starting a new HOn3 layout) will have to be sprayed with Rustoleum.  Maybe that will be the "Miricle Cure".

I dug around and found Frank's message.

I copy it here, in his exact words:

"I don’t think the ACC will migrate over time. One thing that I imagine could happen is that corrosion could build up inside the coupler when not in use and that could keep the ball from lifting and falling properly. If you peer into a stuck coupler when you put the uncoupling wand over it... can you see the ball move up into the top casting? You can see this with a coupler that is operating properly (at least I can with good light and my reading glasses). If the ball doesn’t lift, then there might be corrosion build up in the ball cylinder on the top castings. Corrosion on the zinc castings will be in the form of a white powder on the surface that is typically very easy to remove. If you have a bigger magnet than the ones in the uncoupling wands, you can probably force the ball to come up. Then put the magnet on the bottom of the coupler to force it back down. Once you repeat this a few times the corrosion will be knocked of the critical surfaces as original operation will be restored. I haven’t actually seen this happen – even though I have tried to make it happen by purposely leaving couplers in damp locations for an extended period of time. If you are actually seeing this problem, then I would recommend this big magnet trick. I would also recommend coating the ball cylinder in the top casting and the ball seat in the bottom castings with Neolube prior to assembly (or reassembly as the cast may be). The Neolube is a great corrosion inhibitor. One of the reasons I recommend painting the couplers with Rustoleum is that it includes corrosion inhibitors. Even though the Rustoleum is only on the outside surface of the couplers, its ingredients act as a sacrificial electrode to prevent corrosion and that works for the whole part – not just the surface where the paint is applied. Please let me know what you find out and share with the Yahoo group. I’m certain those guys would be very interested in your findings.
 
Thanks,
Frank"


So, I guess I need Neolube inside, and Rustoleum on the outside.

Ain't it fun?

The other Mike





On Jul 1, 2015, at 9:58 AM, Mike Conder vulturenest1@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Interesting ...

I've been using the new Sharon couplers (I am a TOC narrow gauger) and the website now recommends using a solvent-based spray (Krylon?  I forget exactly).  Wonder if that would help prevent some of this.

It does sound like some sort of atmospheric corrosion, a bit unexpected.

Mike Conder

On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 8:06 AM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 
Mike, some were painted with acrylic craft paint, some were not painted at all.

I believe the painting was done after assembly.  The painting was done with very light, thin coats.  They were brush painted.  I did try to keep the paint on the outside of the couplers.

Some of the painted couplers have the white dust, some don't.  Most of the unpainted ones have the white dust.

I looked at them again, and I see that the painted ones have it on the face of the moveable knuckle and the inside of the fixed jaw, where the paint got rubbed off when I did the "Breaking in".

It would appear the white dust occurs where there is no paint.

Thanks,

another Mike


On Jul 1, 2015, at 1:20 AM, Mike Conder vulturenest1@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 
Mike, did you paint your couplers before assembly, or assemble them without painting?

Mike Conder








Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

George
 

Let's not get the two issues confused. The investment cast couplers had a problem with the casting shape. 

Mike Van Hove (think I got the right one) has been reporting an oxidation issue. 


On Jul 1, 2015, at 12:15 PM, Alan Hummel ahummel72@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:

 

The Other Mike,

Mike,since this is an investment casting product problem,should I assume the corrosion problem can occur even if the couplers come preassembled as mine do?

In Frank's letter,he mentioned a "stronger" magnet than the 1 sold for uncoupling-what type magnet would this be & where can I find them? All I have are refrigerator magnets & I don't think they're as strong as the uncoupling wand.(?)

Thank you,
Al Hummel



Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

Mike Conder
 

Always fun.

It is the Rustoleum that I was trying to remember, I have a can at home.  It really looks good, BTW.

I am curious about the corrosion cause, though.  Do you live in a humid part of the country?  I'm in Denver, have not seen any problems.  Have a good friend in Minnesota, he has more humidity in general but also has not seen problems ... at least, he has not mentioned them.  He also uses the Rustoleum IIRC.

Maybe combination of air pollution, or living on the coast, or ... ?

Mike Conder

On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 9:46 AM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 

Mike,

Frank replied to an email I sent him, in which he said that Rustoleum might prevent the corrosion.

I have not tried this, as all the couplers I have are installed or at least, painted and in a box, waiting to be installed.  Those are the ones in the box that have the corrosion on the parts where the paint has been rubbed off.

I guess the Sharons that I have on order (I finally bit the bullet and i'm starting a new HOn3 layout) will have to be sprayed with Rustoleum.  Maybe that will be the "Miricle Cure".

I dug around and found Frank's message.

I copy it here, in his exact words:

"I don’t think the ACC will migrate over time. One thing that I imagine could happen is that corrosion could build up inside the coupler when not in use and that could keep the ball from lifting and falling properly. If you peer into a stuck coupler when you put the uncoupling wand over it... can you see the ball move up into the top casting? You can see this with a coupler that is operating properly (at least I can with good light and my reading glasses). If the ball doesn’t lift, then there might be corrosion build up in the ball cylinder on the top castings. Corrosion on the zinc castings will be in the form of a white powder on the surface that is typically very easy to remove. If you have a bigger magnet than the ones in the uncoupling wands, you can probably force the ball to come up. Then put the magnet on the bottom of the coupler to force it back down. Once you repeat this a few times the corrosion will be knocked of the critical surfaces as original operation will be restored. I haven’t actually seen this happen – even though I have tried to make it happen by purposely leaving couplers in damp locations for an extended period of time. If you are actually seeing this problem, then I would recommend this big magnet trick. I would also recommend coating the ball cylinder in the top casting and the ball seat in the bottom castings with Neolube prior to assembly (or reassembly as the cast may be). The Neolube is a great corrosion inhibitor. One of the reasons I recommend painting the couplers with Rustoleum is that it includes corrosion inhibitors. Even though the Rustoleum is only on the outside surface of the couplers, its ingredients act as a sacrificial electrode to prevent corrosion and that works for the whole part – not just the surface where the paint is applied. Please let me know what you find out and share with the Yahoo group. I’m certain those guys would be very interested in your findings.
 
Thanks,
Frank"


So, I guess I need Neolube inside, and Rustoleum on the outside.

Ain't it fun?

The other Mike





On Jul 1, 2015, at 9:58 AM, Mike Conder vulturenest1@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Interesting ...

I've been using the new Sharon couplers (I am a TOC narrow gauger) and the website now recommends using a solvent-based spray (Krylon?  I forget exactly).  Wonder if that would help prevent some of this.

It does sound like some sort of atmospheric corrosion, a bit unexpected.

Mike Conder

On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 8:06 AM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 

Mike, some were painted with acrylic craft paint, some were not painted at all.


I believe the painting was done after assembly.  The painting was done with very light, thin coats.  They were brush painted.  I did try to keep the paint on the outside of the couplers.

Some of the painted couplers have the white dust, some don't.  Most of the unpainted ones have the white dust.

I looked at them again, and I see that the painted ones have it on the face of the moveable knuckle and the inside of the fixed jaw, where the paint got rubbed off when I did the "Breaking in".

It would appear the white dust occurs where there is no paint.

Thanks,

another Mike


On Jul 1, 2015, at 1:20 AM, Mike Conder vulturenest1@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Mike, did you paint your couplers before assembly, or assemble them without painting?


Mike Conder







Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

John Niemeyer <jniemeyer@...>
 

Mike
 
First off, it’s pronounced Mini-soooda.
 
My train room is in a heated/air conditioned basement. So, not much temperature variation from summer to winter, maybe 10 degrees variation.
 
I’ve been using Tamiya spray paint with good results. I spray a fine coat on all the unassembled parts first, then clean anything out of the hole the ball fits into. (get your mind out of the gutter, Mike)
 
So far, no problems.
 
John Niemeyer
 

Always fun.

It is the Rustoleum that I was trying to remember, I have a can at home.  It really looks good, BTW.

I am curious about the corrosion cause, though.  Do you live in a humid part of the country?  I'm in Denver, have not seen any problems.  Have a good friend in Minnesota, he has more humidity in general but also has not seen problems ... at least, he has not mentioned them.  He also uses the Rustoleum IIRC.

Maybe combination of air pollution, or living on the coast, or ... ?
 
Mike Conder
 
 
Mike,
 
Frank replied to an email I sent him, in which he said that Rustoleum might prevent the corrosion.
 
I have not tried this, as all the couplers I have are installed or at least, painted and in a box, waiting to be installed.  Those are the ones in the box that have the corrosion on the parts where the paint has been rubbed off.
 
I guess the Sharons that I have on order (I finally bit the bullet and i'm starting a new HOn3 layout) will have to be sprayed with Rustoleum.  Maybe that will be the "Miricle Cure".
 
I dug around and found Frank's message.
 
I copy it here, in his exact words:
 
"I don’t think the ACC will migrate over time. One thing that I imagine could happen is that corrosion could build up inside the coupler when not in use and that could keep the ball from lifting and falling properly. If you peer into a stuck coupler when you put the uncoupling wand over it... can you see the ball move up into the top casting? You can see this with a coupler that is operating properly (at least I can with good light and my reading glasses). If the ball doesn’t lift, then there might be corrosion build up in the ball cylinder on the top castings. Corrosion on the zinc castings will be in the form of a white powder on the surface that is typically very easy to remove. If you have a bigger magnet than the ones in the uncoupling wands, you can probably force the ball to come up. Then put the magnet on the bottom of the coupler to force it back down. Once you repeat this a few times the corrosion will be knocked of the critical surfaces as original operation will be restored. I haven’t actually seen this happen – even though I have tried to make it happen by purposely leaving couplers in damp locations for an extended period of time. If you are actually seeing this problem, then I would recommend this big magnet trick. I would also recommend coating the ball cylinder in the top casting and the ball seat in the bottom castings with Neolube prior to assembly (or reassembly as the cast may be). The Neolube is a great corrosion inhibitor. One of the reasons I recommend painting the couplers with Rustoleum is that it includes corrosion inhibitors. Even though the Rustoleum is only on the outside surface of the couplers, its ingredients act as a sacrificial electrode to prevent corrosion and that works for the whole part – not just the surface where the paint is applied. Please let me know what you find out and share with the Yahoo group. I’m certain those guys would be very interested in your findings.
 
Thanks,
Frank"
 
So, I guess I need Neolube inside, and Rustoleum on the outside.
 
Ain't it fun?
The other Mike

Re: [SergentEng] We've got trouble in River City

Mike Van Hove
 

The "strong" magnet I have is from Sears.  It's a Craftsman Brand telescoping Gizmo to pick up metal objects with.  It's on a telescoping wand about 2 feet long.  The magnet is amazingly strong.  I have a block of steel 1" x 2" x 3" on my bench.  This magnet will pick up this block of steel when I get about 3/4" away from it.  The downside is, no matter where I lay the darn thing down, it usually manages to grab ahold of some metal object nearby.

Even this strong magnet will not dislodge some of the balls in these couplers.  Those will just have to be taken apart, I'm afraid.

I'm rebuilding a 1917 Player Piano, for my wife.   Lots of the parts are assembled using Hot Hide Glue.  There is a cure time on this glue, so while I wait for the glue to cure, I'm working on the couplers.
(And, she wonders why it's taking me so long to get the Piano completed)  VBG
Mike  (the other Mike)



On Jul 1, 2015, at 11:15 AM, Alan Hummel ahummel72@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

The Other Mike,

Mike,since this is an investment casting product problem,should I assume the corrosion problem can occur even if the couplers come preassembled as mine do?

In Frank's letter,he mentioned a "stronger" magnet than the 1 sold for uncoupling-what type magnet would this be & where can I find them? All I have are refrigerator magnets & I don't think they're as strong as the uncoupling wand.(?)

Thank you,
Al Hummel




On Wednesday, July 1, 2015 11:46 AM, "Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng]" <SergentEng@...> wrote:


 
Mike,
Frank replied to an email I sent him, in which he said that Rustoleum might prevent the corrosion.

I have not tried this, as all the couplers I have are installed or at least, painted and in a box, waiting to be installed.  Those are the ones in the box that have the corrosion on the parts where the paint has been rubbed off.

I guess the Sharons that I have on order (I finally bit the bullet and i'm starting a new HOn3 layout) will have to be sprayed with Rustoleum.  Maybe that will be the "Miricle Cure".

I dug around and found Frank's message.

I copy it here, in his exact words:

"I don’t think the ACC will migrate over time. One thing that I imagine could happen is that corrosion could build up inside the coupler when not in use and that could keep the ball from lifting and falling properly. If you peer into a stuck coupler when you put the uncoupling wand over it... can you see the ball move up into the top casting? You can see this with a coupler that is operating properly (at least I can with good light and my reading glasses). If the ball doesn’t lift, then there might be corrosion build up in the ball cylinder on the top castings. Corrosion on the zinc castings will be in the form of a white powder on the surface that is typically very easy to remove. If you have a bigger magnet than the ones in the uncoupling wands, you can probably force the ball to come up. Then put the magnet on the bottom of the coupler to force it back down. Once you repeat this a few times the corrosion will be knocked of the critical surfaces as original operation will be restored. I haven’t actually seen this happen – even though I have tried to make it happen by purposely leaving couplers in damp locations for an extended period of time. If you are actually seeing this problem, then I would recommend this big magnet trick. I would also recommend coating the ball cylinder in the top casting and the ball seat in the bottom castings with Neolube prior to assembly (or reassembly as the cast may be). The Neolube is a great corrosion inhibitor. One of the reasons I recommend painting the couplers with Rustoleum is that it includes corrosion inhibitors. Even though the Rustoleum is only on the outside surface of the couplers, its ingredients act as a sacrificial electrode to prevent corrosion and that works for the whole part – not just the surface where the paint is applied. Please let me know what you find out and share with the Yahoo group. I’m certain those guys would be very interested in your findings.
 
Thanks,
Frank"


So, I guess I need Neolube inside, and Rustoleum on the outside.

Ain't it fun?

The other Mike





On Jul 1, 2015, at 9:58 AM, Mike Conder vulturenest1@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 

Interesting ...

I've been using the new Sharon couplers (I am a TOC narrow gauger) and the website now recommends using a solvent-based spray (Krylon?  I forget exactly).  Wonder if that would help prevent some of this.

It does sound like some sort of atmospheric corrosion, a bit unexpected.

Mike Conder

On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 8:06 AM, Mike Van Hove mvanhove@... [SergentEng] <SergentEng@...> wrote:
 
Mike, some were painted with acrylic craft paint, some were not painted at all.

I believe the painting was done after assembly.  The painting was done with very light, thin coats.  They were brush painted.  I did try to keep the paint on the outside of the couplers.

Some of the painted couplers have the white dust, some don't.  Most of the unpainted ones have the white dust.

I looked at them again, and I see that the painted ones have it on the face of the moveable knuckle and the inside of the fixed jaw, where the paint got rubbed off when I did the "Breaking in".

It would appear the white dust occurs where there is no paint.

Thanks,

another Mike


On Jul 1, 2015, at 1:20 AM, Mike Conder vulturenest1@... [SergentEng] wrote:

 
Mike, did you paint your couplers before assembly, or assemble them without painting?

Mike Conder