Date   
Re: [SergentEng] Taking the Plunge

Lester Brandt
 

Hi Nathan,  I have assembled a large package of the compatible shank & large package of the narrow shank couplers.  Have mounted a few of each & tested on my workbench trackwork (a timesaver).  Suggest you get two (or more) assembly jigs for each type you plan to assemble so you can allow one assembled coupler to dry in the jig as you assemble the next coupler.  Use the minimum of the viscous (thick) CAA.  Sergent has good instructions and suggestions.  After drying, I open the knuckle, hold it vertically, and squirt graphite into the opening in the shank where you can see the tab on the back of the knuckle.  The idea is to get graphite onto all the moving parts.  Manually work the assembled couplers per the instructions to smooth any roughness on the material.  These couplers are one of the best aspects of the hobby.  Les Brandt

On Sunday, April 20, 2014 2:24 AM, "thaddeusthudpucker@..." wrote:
 
Happy Easter!

I am about to take the plunge and order a bulk pack of Sergent couplers. I have a few cars with them already on and they look SO much better than any Kadee coupler.

Does anyone have any tips on doing a ton of coupler assembly at once? I am 25 so my eyesight is still there and I don't have the shakes or anything... 

Plan is to get the couplers ready then pull everything into the shops and convert all at once.

Thanks in advance!
Nathan


Re: [SergentEng] Taking the Plunge

Ryan Harris
 

Nathan,

I really enjoy the assembly process and have done as many as a 144-pack in a single sitting (though I recommend breaking it up into a few sessions). The first thing I do is clean all the parts with a fresh no. 11 blade, scraping each casting where flash might occur (though there is rarely much to scrape off) and finishing with a steel brush. As I clean the parts I sort them into piles of knuckles, shanks and bottom covers. This can take quite a bit of time, especially when assembling a 144-pack, but taking care here makes the end product will operate well.

Next, I put a drop of Loctite Super Glue on the plastic sleeve of an old Details West or Cannon parts pack and use a toothpick to apply the glue to each assembly. I put enough on the cover plate recess so that it oozes out to the sides of the shank when I squeeze the parts together (it really doesn't take much glue at all to do this). Once the assembly has set, I remove it from the fixture and turn it upside down to verify the knuckle will open freely, then turn it back right side up to verify the knuckle locks in place. If it doesn't, I immediately take it apart and start the cleaning process over after all glue has cured. If it does pass my test, I set it aside and leave it to cure.

Once I have all the couplers assembled, I clean them up with the steel brush again and a small file if necessary. I lubricate them with powdered graphite, which is nothing more than a carpenter's pencil rubbed against some coarse sandpaper. I use an old fine paintbrush to force the graphite into the hinge part of the knuckle.

I paint my couplers by drybrushing artists oils or enamels, taking care to avoid getting paint into the knuckle hinge or ball cavity. Once they are painted, I apply some weathering powders onto the still tacky paint.

Ryan H
Fort Worth, TX

On 4/20/2014 2:24 AM, thaddeusthudpucker@... wrote:

Happy Easter!


I am about to take the plunge and order a bulk pack of Sergent couplers. I have a few cars with them already on and they look SO much better than any Kadee coupler.

Does anyone have any tips on doing a ton of coupler assembly at once? I am 25 so my eyesight is still there and I don't have the shakes or anything...

Plan is to get the couplers ready then pull everything into the shops and convert all at once.

Thanks in advance!
Nathan

Re: Taking the Plunge

Alan Hummel
 


 

Hi Nathan:

Though I've never done this either,I've been planning for a few months,studying construction steps,trying to figure the best approach to assembly.

My approach would be to lay out all your parts carefully. Whatever you do,whether it be painting,cleaning out the steel bearing sockets,etc.,do 1 proceedure to all couplers,then move on to the next proceedure. I'm on prescription medications&assemble my medications for 2 weeks at a time&find this proceedure works well,dealing with 1 medication at a time,then moving on to the next 1,instead of changing back&forth. It's an assembly line procedure that works well for me.

Unlike you,I'm 56&the nerves aren't what they used to be,so I may have to go with preessembled couplers,though if I settle my nerves&get all my tools ready before hand,I think I can handle it. The bulk packs are great as far as the cost savings&the number of cars you can put on the track when finished. I can put 72 cars on the track at a time when assembling the SBE coupler bulk pack.

Did you know that there are now airlines on the market that couple magnetically? I've watched the U tube demo&they look really neat,expensive but neat.

Hope this helps.

Happy Easter!

Sincerely,

Alan

 

Re: [SergentEng] Re: Taking the Plunge

Ross Dando
 

I have enjoyed reading these posts! I'm going home from the hospital today. I'm in between 25 and 56, not really 48. i just got bifocals a couple years ago and I made the decision to convert my 1950's equipment and purchased several of the 144 packs and have found it very relaxing to assemble them. Like others i clean, then rub the pencil, sort and finally when i assemble i use a small plastic bin lid as a mat so the small bearings have a place to stay if dropped. i use a pair of long surgical tweezers to put the bearings into 50 or so shanks and then and will I assemble I us a single fixture and glue them together and set aside to dry. Then when the 144 are done I go back and add the additional glue. I stil have not figured out a weathering method that I like. But I have time.
Ross


On Apr 20, 2014, at 7:34 AM, <ahummel72@...> wrote:

 


 

Hi Nathan:

Though I've never done this either,I've been planning for a few months,studying construction steps,trying to figure the best approach to assembly.

My approach would be to lay out all your parts carefully. Whatever you do,whether it be painting,cleaning out the steel bearing sockets,etc.,do 1 proceedure to all couplers,then move on to the next proceedure. I'm on prescription medications&assemble my medications for 2 weeks at a time&find this proceedure works well,dealing with 1 medication at a time,then moving on to the next 1,instead of changing back&forth. It's an assembly line procedure that works well for me.

Unlike you,I'm 56&the nerves aren't what they used to be,so I may have to go with preessembled couplers,though if I settle my nerves&get all my tools ready before hand,I think I can handle it. The bulk packs are great as far as the cost savings&the number of cars you can put on the track when finished. I can put 72 cars on the track at a time when assembling the SBE coupler bulk pack.

Did you know that there are now airlines on the market that couple magnetically? I've watched the U tube demo&they look really neat,expensive but neat.

Hope this helps.

Happy Easter!

Sincerely,

Alan

 

Re: Taking the Plunge

Dave Snyder
 

Hi Nathan, and Holiday Greetings. It's difficult not to get excited about these couplers. But you run the risk of over taxing your self and losing the enjoyment of a job well done. I suggest you clean, scrape and file maybe 5 or 10 at a time and then begin assembly. I've got a jig, but usually just use 3 or 4 slide locking needlepoint  tweezers. One tweezer on flat surface to hold the back of shank for assembly. Fit the ballbearing, knuckle, and top cover and then use a 2nd tweezer to grasp and slide lock the coupler as close as you can to the back base of coupler on the shank. That will leave you room to put a drop of thin or medium ACC on the pin and hole and let it infiltrate in the shank. You just want a drop big enough to cover the pin and the edge of the hole. Then start on the next one. You will develop a rhythm after a while. Fresh ACC  will set up in five or so minutes, so you can just keep going until you finish each batch. Then just test, inspect, lubricate and work in each one. Then I relieve the monotony by painting the couplers or installing some into locos/cars.  You run the risk of getting burnt out and detesting the process if you just gotta do the marathon. Rome wasn't built in one day, and its still beautiful.

Dave Snyder
Louisville, Ky.

Re: [SergentEng] Re: Taking the Plunge

John Degnan
 

Excellent advice.  I've had to adopt a similar pattern to battle the monotony.
 
 
John Degnan
 


From: davesnyder59@...
To: SergentEng@...
Sent: Sunday, April 20, 2014 11:13:58 AM
Subject: [SergentEng] Re: Taking the Plunge

 

Hi Nathan, and Holiday Greetings. It's difficult not to get excited about these couplers. But you run the risk of over taxing your self and losing the enjoyment of a job well done. I suggest you clean, scrape and file maybe 5 or 10 at a time and then begin assembly. I've got a jig, but usually just use 3 or 4 slide locking needlepoint  tweezers. One tweezer on flat surface to hold the back of shank for assembly. Fit the ballbearing, knuckle, and top cover and then use a 2nd tweezer to grasp and slide lock the coupler as close as you can to the back base of coupler on the shank. That will leave you room to put a drop of thin or medium ACC on the pin and hole and let it infiltrate in the shank. You just want a drop big enough to cover the pin and the edge of the hole. Then start on the next one. You will develop a rhythm after a while. Fresh ACC  will set up in five or so minutes, so you can just keep going until you finish each batch. Then just test, inspect, lubricate and work in each one. Then I relieve the monotony by painting the couplers or installing some into locos/cars.  You run the risk of getting burnt out and detesting the process if you just gotta do the marathon. Rome wasn't built in one day, and its still beautiful.


Dave Snyder
Louisville, Ky.


Re: [SergentEng] Re: Taking the Plunge

Christopher Zurek
 

I have assembly jigs for both compatible shank Type E and narrow shank Type E. I keep all the parts in separate empty prescription pill containers that I have labeled, I have a lot of them since I've been on heart meds for three years. One container will have shanks, another covers, another knuckles...
I build a few of each coupler at a time and then keep the assembled couplers in another container. Then I switch to locomotives and rolling stock and do a few installations. I have to break up the monotony because I was diagnosed as borderline ADD about 20 years ago...I can't build a lot at one time.

For other types of couplers (Type F, Type H, Type SBE) I only built those as I need them. I still keep all the parts in separate labeled pill containers.

Chris Z.


On 4/20/2014 10:43 AM, Scaler164@... wrote:
 
Excellent advice.  I've had to adopt a similar pattern to battle the monotony.
 
 
John Degnan
 

From: davesnyder59@...
To: SergentEng@...
Sent: Sunday, April 20, 2014 11:13:58 AM
Subject: [SergentEng] Re: Taking the Plunge

 

Hi Nathan, and Holiday Greetings. It's difficult not to get excited about these couplers. But you run the risk of over taxing your self and losing the enjoyment of a job well done. I suggest you clean, scrape and file maybe 5 or 10 at a time and then begin assembly. I've got a jig, but usually just use 3 or 4 slide locking needlepoint  tweezers. One tweezer on flat surface to hold the back of shank for assembly. Fit the ballbearing, knuckle, and top cover and then use a 2nd tweezer to grasp and slide lock the coupler as close as you can to the back base of coupler on the shank. That will leave you room to put a drop of thin or medium ACC on the pin and hole and let it infiltrate in the shank. You just want a drop big enough to cover the pin and the edge of the hole. Then start on the next one. You will develop a rhythm after a while. Fresh ACC  will set up in five or so minutes, so you can just keep going until you finish each batch. Then just test, inspect, lubricate and work in each one. Then I relieve the monotony by painting the couplers or installing some into locos/cars.  You run the risk of getting burnt out and detesting the process if you just gotta do the marathon. Rome wasn't built in one day, and its still beautiful.


Dave Snyder
Louisville, Ky.



Re: [SergentEng] Re: Taking the Plunge

Christopher Zurek
 

I turned 50 in January and I've been wearing bifocals since I was 38. When I build couplers (or do almost any model building) I have to wear my bifocals and use an Optivisor. I actually have a couple of different ones.

I use the assembly jigs and a pair of sharp point tweezers. Both are stainless steel, one is completely non-magnetic and the other one has a slight amount of magnetism. The slight amount of magnetism helps hold the ball, then I use the non-magnetic tweezers to "scrape" the ball into the hole. For glue I use Super Glue brand Future Glue Gel.

For lubricant I have a couple of pencils and a tube of powdered graphite I bought 33 years ago.

Chris Z.

On 4/20/2014 9:17 AM, Ross wrote:
 
I have enjoyed reading these posts! I'm going home from the hospital today. I'm in between 25 and 56, not really 48. i just got bifocals a couple years ago and I made the decision to convert my 1950's equipment and purchased several of the 144 packs and have found it very relaxing to assemble them. Like others i clean, then rub the pencil, sort and finally when i assemble i use a small plastic bin lid as a mat so the small bearings have a place to stay if dropped. i use a pair of long surgical tweezers to put the bearings into 50 or so shanks and then and will I assemble I us a single fixture and glue them together and set aside to dry. Then when the 144 are done I go back and add the additional glue. I stil have not figured out a weathering method that I like. But I have time.
Ross


On Apr 20, 2014, at 7:34 AM, <ahummel72@...> wrote:

 


 

Hi Nathan:

Though I've never done this either,I've been planning for a few months,studying construction steps,trying to figure the best approach to assembly.

My approach would be to lay out all your parts carefully. Whatever you do,whether it be painting,cleaning out the steel bearing sockets,etc.,do 1 proceedure to all couplers,then move on to the next proceedure. I'm on prescription medications&assemble my medications for 2 weeks at a time&find this proceedure works well,dealing with 1 medication at a time,then moving on to the next 1,instead of changing back&forth. It's an assembly line procedure that works well for me.

Unlike you,I'm 56&the nerves aren't what they used to be,so I may have to go with preessembled couplers,though if I settle my nerves&get all my tools ready before hand,I think I can handle it. The bulk packs are great as far as the cost savings&the number of cars you can put on the track when finished. I can put 72 cars on the track at a time when assembling the SBE coupler bulk pack.

Did you know that there are now airlines on the market that couple magnetically? I've watched the U tube demo&they look really neat,expensive but neat.

Hope this helps.

Happy Easter!

Sincerely,

Alan

 


Re: [SergentEng] Re: Taking the Plunge

Paul Butkowski
 

I took the plunge about a year ago and love them. I also sold my KD's on Ebay in packs of 20 and made enough money to cover the cost of the Sergents. So In my mind, I got them for free. Paul B.

On Sunday, April 20, 2014 12:19 PM, Christopher A. Zurek wrote:
 
I turned 50 in January and I've been wearing bifocals since I was 38. When I build couplers (or do almost any model building) I have to wear my bifocals and use an Optivisor. I actually have a couple of different ones.

I use the assembly jigs and a pair of sharp point tweezers. Both are stainless steel, one is completely non-magnetic and the other one has a slight amount of magnetism. The slight amount of magnetism helps hold the ball, then I use the non-magnetic tweezers to "scrape" the ball into the hole. For glue I use Super Glue brand Future Glue Gel.

For lubricant I have a couple of pencils and a tube of powdered graphite I bought 33 years ago.

Chris Z.

On 4/20/2014 9:17 AM, Ross wrote:
 
I have enjoyed reading these posts! I'm going home from the hospital today. I'm in between 25 and 56, not really 48. i just got bifocals a couple years ago and I made the decision to convert my 1950's equipment and purchased several of the 144 packs and have found it very relaxing to assemble them. Like others i clean, then rub the pencil, sort and finally when i assemble i use a small plastic bin lid as a mat so the small bearings have a place to stay if dropped. i use a pair of long surgical tweezers to put the bearings into 50 or so shanks and then and will I assemble I us a single fixture and glue them together and set aside to dry. Then when the 144 are done I go back and add the additional glue. I stil have not figured out a weathering method that I like. But I have time.
Ross


On Apr 20, 2014, at 7:34 AM, <ahummel72@...> wrote:

 

 
Hi Nathan:
Though I've never done this either,I've been planning for a few months,studying construction steps,trying to figure the best approach to assembly.
My approach would be to lay out all your parts carefully. Whatever you do,whether it be painting,cleaning out the steel bearing sockets,etc.,do 1 proceedure to all couplers,then move on to the next proceedure. I'm on prescription medications&assemble my medications for 2 weeks at a time&find this proceedure works well,dealing with 1 medication at a time,then moving on to the next 1,instead of changing back&forth. It's an assembly line procedure that works well for me.
Unlike you,I'm 56&the nerves aren't what they used to be,so I may have to go with preessembled couplers,though if I settle my nerves&get all my tools ready before hand,I think I can handle it. The bulk packs are great as far as the cost savings&the number of cars you can put on the track when finished. I can put 72 cars on the track at a time when assembling the SBE coupler bulk pack.
Did you know that there are now airlines on the market that couple magnetically? I've watched the U tube demo&they look really neat,expensive but neat.
Hope this helps.
Happy Easter!
Sincerely,
Alan
 



Re: Glatzl

Frank Sergent
 

Hi John and all,
Sorry its been a while sense I last participated in the group. I've been working on several new items and that along will fulfilling current orders has taken most of my time.
The Glatzl couplers were developed completely independently by Frank Glatzl before he ever heard of Sergent Engineering. He is a toolmaker by trade and did the development for himself so he could have working rotary couplers. He did happen to use the prototype profile and so the couplers work just fine Sergent couplers. Dennis at Accurail put us in touch and we have been selling his product ever since.
I'm not sure if would be interested in doing an S scale version or not. Please contact me offlist for his email address.
Thanks,
Frank

Re: Draw Bars

Frank Sergent
 

Hi Ian,

I'm sorry I dropped the ball on this. This still looks easy, and it looks like you have provided plenty of prototype information to allow me to build these. I'm confused about how I could offer something better than what is already installed on the cars from the factory. If we really are talking about just a hunk of rectangular material (metal or plastic) that flares on the ends and includes holes for mounting -- how does anyone mess that up?

Thanks,
Frank

Re: Draw Bars

Martin Matsil
 

Hi gang,did any of the railroads,make married pairs of budd RDC's.?just a question,the TA,has alot of trains in married pair configuration,till the R-44,and R-46,But the R-68 cars were originally single units,and modified into 4 car units,now the new a/c,d/c R-160 cars are depending on the line they ride on,are either,5 car units,or 4 car units.To make up a 8 car train,they couple two 4 car units,for a 10 car train,they couple a 5 car unit.(2).The 10 cars are on the Broadway BMT lines,and The 6th Avenue,line,and 8th Avenue line,Some of the R-46 trains are still on the F line,and the A line,and the B line,to the bronx,use R-68 cars,and the D line to the bronx,The B line starts out in Brighton Beach,and the D starts,out in Coney Island,Though the 4th ave.brooklyn line,and the B line starts out in Brighton beach.then over the Manhattan bridge.to the Concourse.Toot,Toot,have a great holiday.Toot,Toot.

Re: [SergentEng] Re: Draw Bars

Nathan Rich
 

I don't think they ever made married pairs of RDC's

 As I understand it, they only made the ABBA married sets of F units because at the time the unions were insisting that each unit counted as its own locomotive and therefore required its own engineer and fireman. By making the big set of demonstrators, EMD could tour the country and not piss off the unions too much.

It makes more sense to make married pairs of cars on a rapid transit line more than it does on a mainline railroad. If one of the RDC's had to be bad ordered, you would lose the whole set. By leaving the MU connection and couplers in you could split it up and still protect the schedule with the other unit. On a rapid transit system, you would probably have the strength in numbers of being able to pull one set from service for repairs and still have a spare to cover the schedule and have the capacity to meet the peak rush.

Nathan



On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 9:27 AM, <martinmatsil1953@...> wrote:
 

Hi gang,did any of the railroads,make married pairs of budd RDC's.?just a question,the TA,has alot of trains in married pair configuration,till the R-44,and R-46,But the R-68 cars were originally single units,and modified into 4 car units,now the new a/c,d/c R-160 cars are depending on the line they ride on,are either,5 car units,or 4 car units.To make up a 8 car train,they couple two 4 car units,for a 10 car train,they couple a 5 car unit.(2).The 10 cars are on the Broadway BMT lines,and The 6th Avenue,line,and 8th Avenue line,Some of the R-46 trains are still on the F line,and the A line,and the B line,to the bronx,use R-68 cars,and the D line to the bronx,The B line starts out in Brighton Beach,and the D starts,out in Coney Island,Though the 4th ave.brooklyn line,and the B line starts out in Brighton beach.then over the Manhattan bridge.to the Concourse.Toot,Toot,have a great holiday.Toot,Toot.


Re: [SergentEng] Re: Draw Bars

Ernest Puddick
 

The FT AB sets were fitted with draw bars as they were built to run together ie batteries only on one of the units.  Some roads required ABBB sets for Union reasons. 


On 21 Apr 2014, at 19:26, "Nathan Rich" <thaddeusthudpucker@...> wrote:

 

I don't think they ever made married pairs of RDC's

 As I understand it, they only made the ABBA married sets of F units because at the time the unions were insisting that each unit counted as its own locomotive and therefore required its own engineer and fireman. By making the big set of demonstrators, EMD could tour the country and not piss off the unions too much.

It makes more sense to make married pairs of cars on a rapid transit line more than it does on a mainline railroad. If one of the RDC's had to be bad ordered, you would lose the whole set. By leaving the MU connection and couplers in you could split it up and still protect the schedule with the other unit. On a rapid transit system, you would probably have the strength in numbers of being able to pull one set from service for repairs and still have a spare to cover the schedule and have the capacity to meet the peak rush.

Nathan



On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 9:27 AM, <martinmatsil1953@...> wrote:
 

Hi gang,did any of the railroads,make married pairs of budd RDC's.?just a question,the TA,has alot of trains in married pair configuration,till the R-44,and R-46,But the R-68 cars were originally single units,and modified into 4 car units,now the new a/c,d/c R-160 cars are depending on the line they ride on,are either,5 car units,or 4 car units.To make up a 8 car train,they couple two 4 car units,for a 10 car train,they couple a 5 car unit.(2).The 10 cars are on the Broadway BMT lines,and The 6th Avenue,line,and 8th Avenue line,Some of the R-46 trains are still on the F line,and the A line,and the B line,to the bronx,use R-68 cars,and the D line to the bronx,The B line starts out in Brighton Beach,and the D starts,out in Coney Island,Though the 4th ave.brooklyn line,and the B line starts out in Brighton beach.then over the Manhattan bridge.to the Concourse.Toot,Toot,have a great holiday.Toot,Toot.


Re: [SergentEng] Re: Draw Bars

Mark
 

Drawbar clarification the FT demo set was draw barred. Later the FT a b combination had them some railroads did change them or ordered with couplers. 
Some of our club members had F7 sets draw barred a cost effective way to save money. 

Mark Morgan


On Apr 21, 2014, at 14:26, Nathan Rich <thaddeusthudpucker@...> wrote:

 

I don't think they ever made married pairs of RDC's

 As I understand it, they only made the ABBA married sets of F units because at the time the unions were insisting that each unit counted as its own locomotive and therefore required its own engineer and fireman. By making the big set of demonstrators, EMD could tour the country and not piss off the unions too much.

It makes more sense to make married pairs of cars on a rapid transit line more than it does on a mainline railroad. If one of the RDC's had to be bad ordered, you would lose the whole set. By leaving the MU connection and couplers in you could split it up and still protect the schedule with the other unit. On a rapid transit system, you would probably have the strength in numbers of being able to pull one set from service for repairs and still have a spare to cover the schedule and have the capacity to meet the peak rush.

Nathan



On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 9:27 AM, <martinmatsil1953@...> wrote:
 

Hi gang,did any of the railroads,make married pairs of budd RDC's.?just a question,the TA,has alot of trains in married pair configuration,till the R-44,and R-46,But the R-68 cars were originally single units,and modified into 4 car units,now the new a/c,d/c R-160 cars are depending on the line they ride on,are either,5 car units,or 4 car units.To make up a 8 car train,they couple two 4 car units,for a 10 car train,they couple a 5 car unit.(2).The 10 cars are on the Broadway BMT lines,and The 6th Avenue,line,and 8th Avenue line,Some of the R-46 trains are still on the F line,and the A line,and the B line,to the bronx,use R-68 cars,and the D line to the bronx,The B line starts out in Brighton Beach,and the D starts,out in Coney Island,Though the 4th ave.brooklyn line,and the B line starts out in Brighton beach.then over the Manhattan bridge.to the Concourse.Toot,Toot,have a great holiday.Toot,Toot.


Re: [SergentEng] Re: Draw Bars

Nathan Rich
 

I have been known to drawbar F units so that I can get them closer coupled... The gap between two Blue box Athearn units with standard Kadee #5 couplers is about a mile. It looks terrible to my eye...Part of it though is because of where Athearn put the coupler mounting point. I have not yet experimented with making the F units around here use Sergent couplers yet.

Nathan


On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 11:32 AM, Mark <bnonut@...> wrote:
 

Drawbar clarification the FT demo set was draw barred. Later the FT a b combination had them some railroads did change them or ordered with couplers. 
Some of our club members had F7 sets draw barred a cost effective way to save money. 

Mark Morgan


On Apr 21, 2014, at 14:26, Nathan Rich <thaddeusthudpucker@...> wrote:

 

I don't think they ever made married pairs of RDC's

 As I understand it, they only made the ABBA married sets of F units because at the time the unions were insisting that each unit counted as its own locomotive and therefore required its own engineer and fireman. By making the big set of demonstrators, EMD could tour the country and not piss off the unions too much.

It makes more sense to make married pairs of cars on a rapid transit line more than it does on a mainline railroad. If one of the RDC's had to be bad ordered, you would lose the whole set. By leaving the MU connection and couplers in you could split it up and still protect the schedule with the other unit. On a rapid transit system, you would probably have the strength in numbers of being able to pull one set from service for repairs and still have a spare to cover the schedule and have the capacity to meet the peak rush.

Nathan



On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 9:27 AM, <martinmatsil1953@...> wrote:
 

Hi gang,did any of the railroads,make married pairs of budd RDC's.?just a question,the TA,has alot of trains in married pair configuration,till the R-44,and R-46,But the R-68 cars were originally single units,and modified into 4 car units,now the new a/c,d/c R-160 cars are depending on the line they ride on,are either,5 car units,or 4 car units.To make up a 8 car train,they couple two 4 car units,for a 10 car train,they couple a 5 car unit.(2).The 10 cars are on the Broadway BMT lines,and The 6th Avenue,line,and 8th Avenue line,Some of the R-46 trains are still on the F line,and the A line,and the B line,to the bronx,use R-68 cars,and the D line to the bronx,The B line starts out in Brighton Beach,and the D starts,out in Coney Island,Though the 4th ave.brooklyn line,and the B line starts out in Brighton beach.then over the Manhattan bridge.to the Concourse.Toot,Toot,have a great holiday.Toot,Toot.



Re: [SergentEng] Re: Draw Bars

Aaron Heaney
 

Nathan

My first use of Sergent Couplers was on my Stewart F7s. I used them to coupler them together as an ABBA lash-up with Sergent between them using Kadee's close coupling adapter. They look really good.

Aaron Heaney

On Monday, April 21, 2014 2:39 PM, Nathan Rich wrote:
 
I have been known to drawbar F units so that I can get them closer coupled... The gap between two Blue box Athearn units with standard Kadee #5 couplers is about a mile. It looks terrible to my eye...Part of it though is because of where Athearn put the coupler mounting point. I have not yet experimented with making the F units around here use Sergent couplers yet.

Nathan


On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 11:32 AM, Mark <bnonut@...> wrote:
 
Drawbar clarification the FT demo set was draw barred. Later the FT a b combination had them some railroads did change them or ordered with couplers. 
Some of our club members had F7 sets draw barred a cost effective way to save money. 

Mark Morgan


On Apr 21, 2014, at 14:26, Nathan Rich <thaddeusthudpucker@...> wrote:

 
I don't think they ever made married pairs of RDC's

 As I understand it, they only made the ABBA married sets of F units because at the time the unions were insisting that each unit counted as its own locomotive and therefore required its own engineer and fireman. By making the big set of demonstrators, EMD could tour the country and not piss off the unions too much.

It makes more sense to make married pairs of cars on a rapid transit line more than it does on a mainline railroad. If one of the RDC's had to be bad ordered, you would lose the whole set. By leaving the MU connection and couplers in you could split it up and still protect the schedule with the other unit. On a rapid transit system, you would probably have the strength in numbers of being able to pull one set from service for repairs and still have a spare to cover the schedule and have the capacity to meet the peak rush.

Nathan



On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 9:27 AM, <martinmatsil1953@...> wrote:
 
Hi gang,did any of the railroads,make married pairs of budd RDC's.?just a question,the TA,has alot of trains in married pair configuration,till the R-44,and R-46,But the R-68 cars were originally single units,and modified into 4 car units,now the new a/c,d/c R-160 cars are depending on the line they ride on,are either,5 car units,or 4 car units.To make up a 8 car train,they couple two 4 car units,for a 10 car train,they couple a 5 car unit.(2).The 10 cars are on the Broadway BMT lines,and The 6th Avenue,line,and 8th Avenue line,Some of the R-46 trains are still on the F line,and the A line,and the B line,to the bronx,use R-68 cars,and the D line to the bronx,The B line starts out in Brighton Beach,and the D starts,out in Coney Island,Though the 4th ave.brooklyn line,and the B line starts out in Brighton beach.then over the Manhattan bridge.to the Concourse.Toot,Toot,have a great holiday.Toot,Toot.




Re: [SergentEng] Re: Draw Bars

Nathan Rich
 

I'll bet... But I don't have Stewart F7's, I have Athearn's... 

=P

Nathan


On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 12:16 PM, Aaron Heaney <wolfhunt1987@...> wrote:
 

Nathan

My first use of Sergent Couplers was on my Stewart F7s. I used them to coupler them together as an ABBA lash-up with Sergent between them using Kadee's close coupling adapter. They look really good.

Aaron Heaney
On Monday, April 21, 2014 2:39 PM, Nathan Rich <thaddeusthudpucker@...> wrote:
 
I have been known to drawbar F units so that I can get them closer coupled... The gap between two Blue box Athearn units with standard Kadee #5 couplers is about a mile. It looks terrible to my eye...Part of it though is because of where Athearn put the coupler mounting point. I have not yet experimented with making the F units around here use Sergent couplers yet.

Nathan


On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 11:32 AM, Mark <bnonut@...> wrote:
 
Drawbar clarification the FT demo set was draw barred. Later the FT a b combination had them some railroads did change them or ordered with couplers. 
Some of our club members had F7 sets draw barred a cost effective way to save money. 

Mark Morgan


On Apr 21, 2014, at 14:26, Nathan Rich <thaddeusthudpucker@...> wrote:

 
I don't think they ever made married pairs of RDC's

 As I understand it, they only made the ABBA married sets of F units because at the time the unions were insisting that each unit counted as its own locomotive and therefore required its own engineer and fireman. By making the big set of demonstrators, EMD could tour the country and not piss off the unions too much.

It makes more sense to make married pairs of cars on a rapid transit line more than it does on a mainline railroad. If one of the RDC's had to be bad ordered, you would lose the whole set. By leaving the MU connection and couplers in you could split it up and still protect the schedule with the other unit. On a rapid transit system, you would probably have the strength in numbers of being able to pull one set from service for repairs and still have a spare to cover the schedule and have the capacity to meet the peak rush.

Nathan



On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 9:27 AM, <martinmatsil1953@...> wrote:
 
Hi gang,did any of the railroads,make married pairs of budd RDC's.?just a question,the TA,has alot of trains in married pair configuration,till the R-44,and R-46,But the R-68 cars were originally single units,and modified into 4 car units,now the new a/c,d/c R-160 cars are depending on the line they ride on,are either,5 car units,or 4 car units.To make up a 8 car train,they couple two 4 car units,for a 10 car train,they couple a 5 car unit.(2).The 10 cars are on the Broadway BMT lines,and The 6th Avenue,line,and 8th Avenue line,Some of the R-46 trains are still on the F line,and the A line,and the B line,to the bronx,use R-68 cars,and the D line to the bronx,The B line starts out in Brighton Beach,and the D starts,out in Coney Island,Though the 4th ave.brooklyn line,and the B line starts out in Brighton beach.then over the Manhattan bridge.to the Concourse.Toot,Toot,have a great holiday.Toot,Toot.





Re: [SergentEng] Re: Draw Bars

Mark
 

He he Own eight sets of Stewart FT and they are drawbar with sergent couplers. Love this brand of coupler so all will be equipped with them. 

Mark Morgan 


On Apr 21, 2014, at 15:17, Nathan Rich <thaddeusthudpucker@...> wrote:

 

I'll bet... But I don't have Stewart F7's, I have Athearn's... 

=P

Nathan


On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 12:16 PM, Aaron Heaney <wolfhunt1987@...> wrote:
 

Nathan

My first use of Sergent Couplers was on my Stewart F7s. I used them to coupler them together as an ABBA lash-up with Sergent between them using Kadee's close coupling adapter. They look really good.

Aaron Heaney
On Monday, April 21, 2014 2:39 PM, Nathan Rich <thaddeusthudpucker@...> wrote:
 
I have been known to drawbar F units so that I can get them closer coupled... The gap between two Blue box Athearn units with standard Kadee #5 couplers is about a mile. It looks terrible to my eye...Part of it though is because of where Athearn put the coupler mounting point. I have not yet experimented with making the F units around here use Sergent couplers yet.

Nathan


On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 11:32 AM, Mark <bnonut@...> wrote:
 
Drawbar clarification the FT demo set was draw barred. Later the FT a b combination had them some railroads did change them or ordered with couplers. 
Some of our club members had F7 sets draw barred a cost effective way to save money. 

Mark Morgan


On Apr 21, 2014, at 14:26, Nathan Rich <thaddeusthudpucker@...> wrote:

 
I don't think they ever made married pairs of RDC's

 As I understand it, they only made the ABBA married sets of F units because at the time the unions were insisting that each unit counted as its own locomotive and therefore required its own engineer and fireman. By making the big set of demonstrators, EMD could tour the country and not piss off the unions too much.

It makes more sense to make married pairs of cars on a rapid transit line more than it does on a mainline railroad. If one of the RDC's had to be bad ordered, you would lose the whole set. By leaving the MU connection and couplers in you could split it up and still protect the schedule with the other unit. On a rapid transit system, you would probably have the strength in numbers of being able to pull one set from service for repairs and still have a spare to cover the schedule and have the capacity to meet the peak rush.

Nathan



On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 9:27 AM, <martinmatsil1953@...> wrote:
 
Hi gang,did any of the railroads,make married pairs of budd RDC's.?just a question,the TA,has alot of trains in married pair configuration,till the R-44,and R-46,But the R-68 cars were originally single units,and modified into 4 car units,now the new a/c,d/c R-160 cars are depending on the line they ride on,are either,5 car units,or 4 car units.To make up a 8 car train,they couple two 4 car units,for a 10 car train,they couple a 5 car unit.(2).The 10 cars are on the Broadway BMT lines,and The 6th Avenue,line,and 8th Avenue line,Some of the R-46 trains are still on the F line,and the A line,and the B line,to the bronx,use R-68 cars,and the D line to the bronx,The B line starts out in Brighton Beach,and the D starts,out in Coney Island,Though the 4th ave.brooklyn line,and the B line starts out in Brighton beach.then over the Manhattan bridge.to the Concourse.Toot,Toot,have a great holiday.Toot,Toot.





Re: [SergentEng] Re: Taking the Plunge

Nathan Rich
 

It's official, two bulk packs are coming here as well as a couple more wands and a pair of assembly fixtures... thanks for your input, and I will keep you all updated as this goes on

Nathan


On Sun, Apr 20, 2014 at 4:47 PM, Paul Butkowski <paulbutkowski@...> wrote:
 

I took the plunge about a year ago and love them. I also sold my KD's on Ebay in packs of 20 and made enough money to cover the cost of the Sergents. So In my mind, I got them for free. Paul B.
On Sunday, April 20, 2014 12:19 PM, Christopher A. Zurek <zurekc@q.com> wrote:
 
I turned 50 in January and I've been wearing bifocals since I was 38. When I build couplers (or do almost any model building) I have to wear my bifocals and use an Optivisor. I actually have a couple of different ones.

I use the assembly jigs and a pair of sharp point tweezers. Both are stainless steel, one is completely non-magnetic and the other one has a slight amount of magnetism. The slight amount of magnetism helps hold the ball, then I use the non-magnetic tweezers to "scrape" the ball into the hole. For glue I use Super Glue brand Future Glue Gel.

For lubricant I have a couple of pencils and a tube of powdered graphite I bought 33 years ago.

Chris Z.

On 4/20/2014 9:17 AM, Ross wrote:
 
I have enjoyed reading these posts! I'm going home from the hospital today. I'm in between 25 and 56, not really 48. i just got bifocals a couple years ago and I made the decision to convert my 1950's equipment and purchased several of the 144 packs and have found it very relaxing to assemble them. Like others i clean, then rub the pencil, sort and finally when i assemble i use a small plastic bin lid as a mat so the small bearings have a place to stay if dropped. i use a pair of long surgical tweezers to put the bearings into 50 or so shanks and then and will I assemble I us a single fixture and glue them together and set aside to dry. Then when the 144 are done I go back and add the additional glue. I stil have not figured out a weathering method that I like. But I have time.
Ross


On Apr 20, 2014, at 7:34 AM, <ahummel72@...> wrote:

 

 
Hi Nathan:
Though I've never done this either,I've been planning for a few months,studying construction steps,trying to figure the best approach to assembly.
My approach would be to lay out all your parts carefully. Whatever you do,whether it be painting,cleaning out the steel bearing sockets,etc.,do 1 proceedure to all couplers,then move on to the next proceedure. I'm on prescription medications&assemble my medications for 2 weeks at a time&find this proceedure works well,dealing with 1 medication at a time,then moving on to the next 1,instead of changing back&forth. It's an assembly line procedure that works well for me.
Unlike you,I'm 56&the nerves aren't what they used to be,so I may have to go with preessembled couplers,though if I settle my nerves&get all my tools ready before hand,I think I can handle it. The bulk packs are great as far as the cost savings&the number of cars you can put on the track when finished. I can put 72 cars on the track at a time when assembling the SBE coupler bulk pack.
Did you know that there are now airlines on the market that couple magnetically? I've watched the U tube demo&they look really neat,expensive but neat.
Hope this helps.
Happy Easter!
Sincerely,
Alan