Date   
Re: [SergentEng] RE: Drilling Holes for Top Operating Detail

Christopher Zurek
 

A friend of mine was able to procure a small chunk of scrap structural aluminum for me. I milled a fixture and then drilled and tapped a hole so the coupler is held in place.

It works quite well.

Chris Z.


On 1/23/2014 2:32 PM, train346@q.com wrote:
 

Chris

I would spend some time with your mill and make a fixture for holding the couplers.  I would make the fixture so that the coupler would be held in place with a screw through the hole in the shank.  The fixture should precisely locate the coupler each time one is put in place.

The hole in the coupler then would be located by the Z-Y movement of the mill table and no fiddling would be necessary from one coupler to the next.  Use a solid carbide drill because they are stiff and will make a hole where they are pointed, not wander about like a typical twist drill.  A really light touch on the Z movement will be essential to avoid going too deep into the coupler. 

I cannot answer your question about exactly where the hole should be.  It think it would be worth buying a package of couplers with the top operating feature to learn just where and how deep the hole is.

Rex Beistle

NMRA RMR

Estes Valley Division


Re: [SergentEng] RE: Drilling Holes for Top Operating Detail

Christopher Zurek
 

Frank,

As a mentioned in the other email I made a fixture from scrap structural aluminum.

I'm actually able to drill the holes with the Seig X2 and it still has it's original plastic gears.

As for the loop, I'm using some small etched brass lift rings that were made by Trout Creek Engineering. I think they are made by Taurus Products now.

Chris Z.

On 1/25/2014 10:23 PM, fsergent@... wrote:
 

Hi Folks,


I clamp a modified assembly fixture in an old Unimat SL to drill the tops on EC87 and EN87 couplers. I just use my finger to push the coupler against the dowel pins in the assembly fixture to make sure I hit the same location each time. The modification of the fixture is basically just some shim material glued to the fixture to support the coupler head while the drill pushes down on it. You can do a bunch this way pretty quickly.


I use #80 carbide drills intended for printed circuit boards at a high speed. You can generally find these on ebay by the pound. Be aware and beware that these are very brittle though. Don't think you can do this without safety glasses. A Seig X2 might be a bit overpowered for this job and vibration might be more than the tiny carbide drills can handle. I think you can buy kits to convert these to belt driven to reduce the vibration. I've got a Seig X2 as well, but I go to the small (really small) Unimat for this job.


I generally just drill in the location that is more or less centered in the raised "D" on top of the coupler horn. Something that should be considered when drilling holes is how you are going the make the loop. I'm not really impressed with the appearance of the commercially available lift rings because they just don't seem to look right on top of the coupler. They are too big. I think you can do better with wire. The process is described somewhere on the website. If you want to go the wire route, you need to offset the hole forward or back of where you want the ring to be.


Frank 


Pilot couplers

John Short
 

Good morning!

I am in the process of converting my HOn3 rolling stock from Kadee 714 couplers to the new Sergent Engineering Sharon couplers.  Has anyone found a problem with using these diecast couplers on the front pilot of Blackstone locomotives?  I am specifically concerned about a short-circuit when double-heading.  So far, I have seen no negative information regarding this.

By the way, these Sharon couplers are a very easy installation into the Blackstone cars!  Very impressive product!

Thanks in advance for any information that people may provide.

John Short

Re: Pilot couplers

jzook@...
 

Hi John,


I have converted one of my Blackstone's to Sharon couplers on the pilot and the tender.  The locomotive I chose was my K-27 #459, which I also did a snowplow conversion on.  I've had no problems running double headers with this locomotive.  I believe the pilot and tender coupler boxes are isolated from the frame, so this shouldn't be a problem.  BTW, the Sharon looks awesome with the snow plow!  Very prototypical in appearance.  I did have to file down the underside of the plow so the coupler could move side to side more freely.


Jon

Re: [SergentEng] Pilot couplers

John Niemeyer <jniemeyer@...>
 

John
 
I have mounted several of the front pilot “E” type couplers (ES1P87) to brass engines. No problems with double heading. I just don’t couple front to front steam engines and have never seen a narrow gauge prototype coupled that way either. The rear couplers on my equipment are all insulated anyway.
 
John


Good morning!

I am in the process of converting my HOn3 rolling stock from Kadee 714 couplers to the new Sergent Engineering Sharon couplers.  Has anyone found a problem with using these diecast couplers on the front pilot of Blackstone locomotives?  I am specifically concerned about a short-circuit when double-heading.  So far, I have seen no negative information regarding this.

By the way, these Sharon couplers are a very easy installation into the Blackstone cars!  Very impressive product!

Thanks in advance for any information that people may provide.

John Short

Re: Pilot couplers

Dale Buxton
 

If you put the Sharon's that you mount on the brass tenders end beam in an old Kadee 714 coupler box, the pilot of the second brass engine behind it will NEVER have any through the train shorting out issues. This same fix holds true for any of the all metal (brass) rolling stock that you own. Put those Sharon's in your old Kadee 714 coupler boxes and you will never have any through the car shorting problems. NEVER!


Dale Buxton

The RGS nut

Re: [SergentEng] RE: Pilot couplers

John Short
 

Thanks, Jon.

 

I was hoping that they were isolated, but did not really know.  I did not have a problem with the older Sergent couplers on the old layout, which I had to tear down in order to move.  However, a new (larger) layout is on the way!  Thanks for the quick reply!

 

John

 

From: SergentEng@... [mailto:SergentEng@...] On Behalf Of jzook@...
Sent: Friday, February 07, 2014 9:57 AM
To: SergentEng@...
Subject: [SergentEng] RE: Pilot couplers

 

 

Hi John,

 

I have converted one of my Blackstone's to Sharon couplers on the pilot and the tender.  The locomotive I chose was my K-27 #459, which I also did a snowplow conversion on.  I've had no problems running double headers with this locomotive.  I believe the pilot and tender coupler boxes are isolated from the frame, so this shouldn't be a problem.  BTW, the Sharon looks awesome with the snow plow!  Very prototypical in appearance.  I did have to file down the underside of the plow so the coupler could move side to side more freely.

 

Jon

Re: [SergentEng] Pilot couplers

John Short
 

Thanks, Jon.

 

I have used, in the past, Kadee 714s with my brass locos, so I wasn't concerned.  With the Sergents, I was planning, on the brass locos, to use the plastic Accumate boxes, so that should not pose a problem either.  I was not sure about using the metal coupler in the diecast Blackstone engines, and if there would be a problem with double-heading.

 

Thanks for the quick response.

 

John Short

 

From: SergentEng@... [mailto:SergentEng@...] On Behalf Of John Niemeyer
Sent: Friday, February 07, 2014 10:08 AM
To: SergentEng@...
Subject: Re: [SergentEng] Pilot couplers

 

 

John

 

I have mounted several of the front pilot “E” type couplers (ES1P87) to brass engines. No problems with double heading. I just don’t couple front to front steam engines and have never seen a narrow gauge prototype coupled that way either. The rear couplers on my equipment are all insulated anyway.

 

John



Good morning!

I am in the process of converting my HOn3 rolling stock from Kadee 714 couplers to the new Sergent Engineering Sharon couplers.  Has anyone found a problem with using these diecast couplers on the front pilot of Blackstone locomotives?  I am specifically concerned about a short-circuit when double-heading.  So far, I have seen no negative information regarding this.

By the way, these Sharon couplers are a very easy installation into the Blackstone cars!  Very impressive product!

Thanks in advance for any information that people may provide.

John Short

Re: [SergentEng] RE: Pilot couplers

John Short
 

Thanks, Dale.

 

I would be using the Accumate boxes on the brass locos - I just was not sure if the diecast Blackstone locomotives were somehow isolated to prevent a short if using the metal Sergent coupler on the front and rear of the locomotive.

 

John

 

From: SergentEng@... [mailto:SergentEng@...] On Behalf Of the_one_tuatha_ddana@...
Sent: Friday, February 07, 2014 11:50 AM
To: SergentEng@...
Subject: [SergentEng] RE: Pilot couplers

 

 

If you put the Sharon's that you mount on the brass tenders end beam in an old Kadee 714 coupler box, the pilot of the second brass engine behind it will NEVER have any through the train shorting out issues. This same fix holds true for any of the all metal (brass) rolling stock that you own. Put those Sharon's in your old Kadee 714 coupler boxes and you will never have any through the car shorting problems. NEVER!

 

Dale Buxton

The RGS nut

Re: Pilot couplers

Dale Buxton
 

As a side note here. On D&RG narrow gauge locomotives the couplers did not extend over the pilot cages prow. Meaning, that it was impossible to couple these locomotives pilot to pilot. The pilot prows would strike each other before the coupler knuckles got anywhere near each other. And the only place you will find two locomotives in a train facing opposite directions is in rotary plow trains. But even then, there was a car or caboose between these engines.

Dale Buxton

Re: [SergentEng] Pilot couplers

Dale Buxton
 

WARNING John!


If your new layout has curves with anything less than 24" radius, the Accumate coupler box will not allow your cars trucks to swing all of the distance they need to make the curve. Been there done that! So hold onto those old Kadee 714 coupler boxes. As sure as there are little green apples, There will be some instance come up where you will need them.


Dale Buxton

Re: [SergentEng] (unknown)

Christopher Zurek
 

I have a pair of stainless steel tweezers. One in totally non-magnetic and the other is not.

The magnetic one has only a very slight amount of magnetism that it got from touching an uncoupling wand. I use that one to pick up springs or balls. I use the non-magnetic one to help place the item and remove it from the magnetic tweezer.

Chris Z.


On 2/6/2014 8:52 AM, Mike Van Hove wrote:
�

Good morning all,

I have had great success with a very small screwdriver. �It's the smallest of the set of drivers that I own.

It has somehow become ever so slightly magnetized. �I can pick up a spring on the end. �I don't try to impale the spring with the screwdriver. �I can guide the spring into the pocket of the coupler with the screwdriver blade, then just hold the spring down with my thumbnail and withdraw the screwdriver. �Works nearly every time.
I also use the same screwdriver to pick up (1) ball Bearing and insert it in the hole in the coupler. �I use a .5 mm lead pencil to hold the ball while I remove the screwdriver.
Like I said, the blade is just barely magnetized. �I'm not sure how well this would work if it were heavily magnetized.

Hope something here may help.

Mike Van Hove
On Feb 6, 2014, at 6:13 AM, Alan Hummel wrote:

�

Thank you Morgan,I bought a Spring Pic years ago,now the trick is to find the thing!!! Ever have that trouble?�Thanks for your input.
Best Regards,
Alan Hummel


On Thursday, February 6, 2014 2:24 AM, "morganreed@..." <morganreed@...> wrote:
�
As another person switching from Kadee's to Sergent I join in recommending the reamer. �I have a fair number of Sunshine kits and the mount is of VARIBLE size. �The reamer saves the day on that count. �Another tool I found useful is the Kadee "Pic" for inserting those *###?!!@ little springs. �If you use the tool and your thumb you can install quite a few in a row before one of them launches into space. �The spring really does help in lining up the couplers. �The final visual effect of the Sergent is, in my opinion worth the effort. �Have fun!

Morgan Reed





Re: [SergentEng] (unknown)

Alan Hummel
 

Thanks Chris since I need a wand anyway,that kills 2 birds with 1 stone.Uh,ya,something like that. 
Al Hummel


On Friday, February 7, 2014 3:48 PM, Christopher A. Zurek wrote:
 
I have a pair of stainless steel tweezers. One in totally non-magnetic and the other is not.

The magnetic one has only a very slight amount of magnetism that it got from touching an uncoupling wand. I use that one to pick up springs or balls. I use the non-magnetic one to help place the item and remove it from the magnetic tweezer.

Chris Z.


On 2/6/2014 8:52 AM, Mike Van Hove wrote:
 
Good morning all,
I have had great success with a very small screwdriver.  It's the smallest of the set of drivers that I own.

It has somehow become ever so slightly magnetized.  I can pick up a spring on the end.  I don't try to impale the spring with the screwdriver.  I can guide the spring into the pocket of the coupler with the screwdriver blade, then just hold the spring down with my thumbnail and withdraw the screwdriver.  Works nearly every time.
I also use the same screwdriver to pick up (1) ball Bearing and insert it in the hole in the coupler.  I use a .5 mm lead pencil to hold the ball while I remove the screwdriver.
Like I said, the blade is just barely magnetized.  I'm not sure how well this would work if it were heavily magnetized.

Hope something here may help.

Mike Van Hove
On Feb 6, 2014, at 6:13 AM, Alan Hummel wrote:

 

Thank you Morgan,I bought a Spring Pic years ago,now the trick is to find the thing!!! Ever have that trouble? Thanks for your input.
Best Regards,
Alan Hummel


On Thursday, February 6, 2014 2:24 AM, "morganreed@..." <morganreed@...> wrote:
 
As another person switching from Kadee's to Sergent I join in recommending the reamer.  I have a fair number of Sunshine kits and the mount is of VARIBLE size.  The reamer saves the day on that count.  Another tool I found useful is the Kadee "Pic" for inserting those *###?!!@ little springs.  If you use the tool and your thumb you can install quite a few in a row before one of them launches into space.  The spring really does help in lining up the couplers.  The final visual effect of the Sergent is, in my opinion worth the effort.  Have fun!

Morgan Reed







Re: [SergentEng] (unknown)

Alan Hummel
 

Thanks Chris that's nice to know. i need a wand anyhow,so that will be like killing 2 birds with 1 stone,or something like that.  
Thank you.
Al Hummel


On Friday, February 7, 2014 3:49 PM, Christopher A. Zurek wrote:
 
I have a pair of stainless steel tweezers. One in totally non-magnetic and the other is not.

The magnetic one has only a very slight amount of magnetism that it got from touching an uncoupling wand. I use that one to pick up springs or balls. I use the non-magnetic one to help place the item and remove it from the magnetic tweezer.

Chris Z.


On 2/6/2014 8:52 AM, Mike Van Hove wrote:
 
Good morning all,
I have had great success with a very small screwdriver.  It's the smallest of the set of drivers that I own.

It has somehow become ever so slightly magnetized.  I can pick up a spring on the end.  I don't try to impale the spring with the screwdriver.  I can guide the spring into the pocket of the coupler with the screwdriver blade, then just hold the spring down with my thumbnail and withdraw the screwdriver.  Works nearly every time.
I also use the same screwdriver to pick up (1) ball Bearing and insert it in the hole in the coupler.  I use a .5 mm lead pencil to hold the ball while I remove the screwdriver.
Like I said, the blade is just barely magnetized.  I'm not sure how well this would work if it were heavily magnetized.

Hope something here may help.

Mike Van Hove
On Feb 6, 2014, at 6:13 AM, Alan Hummel wrote:

 

Thank you Morgan,I bought a Spring Pic years ago,now the trick is to find the thing!!! Ever have that trouble? Thanks for your input.
Best Regards,
Alan Hummel


On Thursday, February 6, 2014 2:24 AM, "morganreed@..." <morganreed@...> wrote:
 
As another person switching from Kadee's to Sergent I join in recommending the reamer.  I have a fair number of Sunshine kits and the mount is of VARIBLE size.  The reamer saves the day on that count.  Another tool I found useful is the Kadee "Pic" for inserting those *###?!!@ little springs.  If you use the tool and your thumb you can install quite a few in a row before one of them launches into space.  The spring really does help in lining up the couplers.  The final visual effect of the Sergent is, in my opinion worth the effort.  Have fun!

Morgan Reed







Re: [SergentEng] RE: Drilling Holes for Top Operating Detail

Christopher Zurek
 

Frank,

Any seller on eBay that you recommend for these bits? I have a few right now that I got out of Harbor Freight variety packs, but I'd like to have more in case I break any.

Chris Z.

On 1/25/2014 10:23 PM, fsergent@... wrote:
 
I use #80 carbide drills intended for printed circuit boards at a high speed. You can generally find these on ebay by the pound. Be aware and beware that these are very brittle though. Don't think you can do this without safety glasses. A Seig X2 might be a bit overpowered for this job and vibration might be more than the tiny carbide drills can handle. I think you can buy kits to convert these to belt driven to reduce the vibration. I've got a Seig X2 as well, but I go to the small (really small) Unimat for this job.




Re: [SergentEng] RE: Drilling Holes for Top Operating Detail

George A.Nefstead Sr.
 

Frank,

As I normally do not use Harbor  Freight or E Bay for any tool purchase I can not  recommend  them as a source for small drills.

I generally purchase all my perishable tooling from the links provided below. If for no other reason then quality and knowing that item is new

 

http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-drill-bits/=qm9iz0

 

http://www.mscdirect.com/?cid=ppc-google-Brand+--+P_sXALkJDC7_m%20sc_p_28652162704_c_S&mkwid=sXALkJDC7|dc&pcrid=28652162704&002=2167139&004=8097509704&005=270919242&006=28652162704&007=Search&008=&025=c&026=

 

Two other sources I have dealt with for supplies are  Grizzly Tools & Little Machine Shop . com ( Mainly for larger tooling & Machine parts )

 

Good Luck in your search

 

George @ TVW Miniatures

 

 

 

 

 

From: SergentEng@... [mailto:SergentEng@...] On Behalf Of Christopher A. Zurek
Sent: Sunday, February 09, 2014 1:03 AM
To: SergentEng@...
Subject: Re: [SergentEng] RE: Drilling Holes for Top Operating Detail

 

 

Frank,

Any seller on eBay that you recommend for these bits? I have a few right now that I got out of Harbor Freight variety packs, but I'd like to have more in case I break any.

Chris Z.

On 1/25/2014 10:23 PM, fsergent@... wrote:

 

I use #80 carbide drills intended for printed circuit boards at a high speed. You can generally find these on ebay by the pound. Be aware and beware that these are very brittle though. Don't think you can do this without safety glasses. A Seig X2 might be a bit overpowered for this job and vibration might be more than the tiny carbide drills can handle. I think you can buy kits to convert these to belt driven to reduce the vibration. I've got a Seig X2 as well, but I go to the small (really small) Unimat for this job.

 

 

 

Re: [SergentEng] RE: Drilling Holes for Top Operating Detail

John Niemeyer <jniemeyer@...>
 

I think Frank and his wife are away from the computer until after Feb. 15. It’s posted of his web page.
 
John
 
Frank,

As I normally do not use Harbor  Freight or E Bay for any tool purchase I can not  recommend  them as a source for small drills.

I generally purchase all my perishable tooling from the links provided below. If for no other reason then quality and knowing that item is new

 

http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-drill-bits/=qm9iz0

 

http://www.mscdirect.com/?cid=ppc-google-Brand+--+P_sXALkJDC7_m%20sc_p_28652162704_c_S&mkwid=sXALkJDC7|dc&pcrid=28652162704&002=2167139&004=8097509704&005=270919242&006=28652162704&007=Search&008=&025=c&026=

 

Two other sources I have dealt with for supplies are  Grizzly Tools & Little Machine Shop . com ( Mainly for larger tooling & Machine parts )

 

Good Luck in your search

 

George @ TVW Miniatures

 

 

 

 

 

From: SergentEng@... [mailto:SergentEng@...] On Behalf Of Christopher A. Zurek
Sent: Sunday, February 09, 2014 1:03 AM
To: SergentEng@...
Subject: Re: [SergentEng] RE: Drilling Holes for Top Operating Detail

 

 

Frank,

Any seller on eBay that you recommend for these bits? I have a few right now that I got out of Harbor Freight variety packs, but I'd like to have more in case I break any.

Chris Z.

On 1/25/2014 10:23 PM, fsergent@... wrote:

 

I use #80 carbide drills intended for printed circuit boards at a high speed. You can generally find these on ebay by the pound. Be aware and beware that these are very brittle though. Don't think you can do this without safety glasses. A Seig X2 might be a bit overpowered for this job and vibration might be more than the tiny carbide drills can handle. I think you can buy kits to convert these to belt driven to reduce the vibration. I've got a Seig X2 as well, but I go to the small (really small) Unimat for this job.

 

 

 

Re: [SergentEng] RE: Drilling Holes for Top Operating Detail

Arthur Flatray
 

This is one place to get all kinds of drill bits

https://www.drillbitcity.com/Default.asp

 Art


From: Christopher A. Zurek
To: SergentEng@...
Sent: Saturday, February 8, 2014 11:02 PM
Subject: Re: [SergentEng] RE: Drilling Holes for Top Operating Detail

 
Frank,

Any seller on eBay that you recommend for these bits? I have a few right now that I got out of Harbor Freight variety packs, but I'd like to have more in case I break any.

Chris Z.

On 1/25/2014 10:23 PM, fsergent@... wrote:
 
I use #80 carbide drills intended for printed circuit boards at a high speed. You can generally find these on ebay by the pound. Be aware and beware that these are very brittle though. Don't think you can do this without safety glasses. A Seig X2 might be a bit overpowered for this job and vibration might be more than the tiny carbide drills can handle. I think you can buy kits to convert these to belt driven to reduce the vibration. I've got a Seig X2 as well, but I go to the small (really small) Unimat for this job.





Re: [SergentEng] RE: Drilling Holes for Top Operating Detail

Jared Harper
 

I use McMaster-Carr.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


---In SergentEng@..., <zurekc@...> wrote:

Frank,

Any seller on eBay that you recommend for these bits? I have a few right now that I got out of Harbor Freight variety packs, but I'd like to have more in case I break any.

Chris Z.

On 1/25/2014 10:23 PM, fsergent@... wrote:
 
I use #80 carbide drills intended for printed circuit boards at a high speed. You can generally find these on ebay by the pound. Be aware and beware that these are very brittle though. Don't think you can do this without safety glasses. A Seig X2 might be a bit overpowered for this job and vibration might be more than the tiny carbide drills can handle. I think you can buy kits to convert these to belt driven to reduce the vibration. I've got a Seig X2 as well, but I go to the small (really small) Unimat for this job.




Getting back to work

Frank Sergent
 

Hi Folks,
I have been out of the country for two weeks and am just now back and trying to get caught up. I thought I would be able to keep up with my email while away, but that didn't work out so well. Please have patience while we try to get the piles of orders and other requests that have come in over the last two weeks sorted out.
Thanks,
Frank