Introduction


Sandy Chacko
 

I am a direct descendent of George Darling who was a SPOW and was sent to American colonies on the ship Unity and was and indentured servant at the Saugus Iron Works in Massachusetts. This is what I currently have for my ancestral linkage to George Darling.

1. George Darling (1615-1693). 2. Jonathan Darling 1658-1716). 3. John Darling (1683-1735). 4. John Flanders Darling (1716-1795)
5. William Darling (1742-1812). 6. John Josiah Darling (1779-1868). 7. Robert Darling (abt 1809-1891) 8. Albro Edison Darling (1848-1941)
9. Robert David Darling (1871-1952). 10. Beulah Violet Rose Darling (1911-2003). 11. Joan Marie Draheim (1930-2009)
12. Sandra Chacko (Beermann-maiden name) (1952-)

I am excited to learn more about my ancestors.


Terrance Filter
 

well done Sandy...good luck with the ongoing search for info!
Terry Filter, descendant of William Anderson


On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 11:00 AM Sandy Chacko <sandy.chacko@...> wrote:
I am a direct descendent of George Darling who was a SPOW and was sent to American colonies on the ship Unity and was and indentured servant at the Saugus Iron Works in Massachusetts.  This is what I currently have for my ancestral linkage to George Darling.

1. George Darling (1615-1693). 2. Jonathan Darling 1658-1716). 3. John Darling (1683-1735). 4. John Flanders Darling (1716-1795)
5. William Darling (1742-1812). 6. John Josiah Darling (1779-1868). 7. Robert Darling (abt 1809-1891) 8. Albro Edison Darling (1848-1941)
9. Robert David Darling (1871-1952). 10. Beulah Violet Rose Darling (1911-2003). 11. Joan Marie Draheim (1930-2009)
12. Sandra Chacko (Beermann-maiden name) (1952-)

I am excited to learn more about my ancestors.





Mark Johnson
 

To Sandy Chacko and others ... while there's lots available online, two terrific books are available on Amazon:

The Dunbar Martyrs: Scottish Prisoners of War in Durham Cathedral, 1650 | Webb, Simon
The Involuntary American: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World | Gardner, Carol

Mark Johnson

1. Malcolm MacCallum 1630-1683, SPOW, 8th great-grandfather
2. Caleb Callum 1664-1716
3. John Callum 1700-1754
4. Jemima Callum 1728-1776
.
.
.
11. Mark Everett Johnson 1956-

 


Joey Darling Sr.
 

Hi Sandy! I am also a direct descendant of George Darling. Hi!

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022, 11:00 AM Sandy Chacko <sandy.chacko@...> wrote:
I am a direct descendent of George Darling who was a SPOW and was sent to American colonies on the ship Unity and was and indentured servant at the Saugus Iron Works in Massachusetts.  This is what I currently have for my ancestral linkage to George Darling.

1. George Darling (1615-1693). 2. Jonathan Darling 1658-1716). 3. John Darling (1683-1735). 4. John Flanders Darling (1716-1795)
5. William Darling (1742-1812). 6. John Josiah Darling (1779-1868). 7. Robert Darling (abt 1809-1891) 8. Albro Edison Darling (1848-1941)
9. Robert David Darling (1871-1952). 10. Beulah Violet Rose Darling (1911-2003). 11. Joan Marie Draheim (1930-2009)
12. Sandra Chacko (Beermann-maiden name) (1952-)

I am excited to learn more about my ancestors.





Sandy Chacko
 

Thanks.  So nice to hear from you.  I am just curious if we share any of the Darling ancestors that I listed or do our ancestors branch off early after George Darling came to the US?
Best to you and your family,
Sandy

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 12:21 PM Joey Darling Sr. <Joey.darling1978@...> wrote:
Hi Sandy! I am also a direct descendant of George Darling. Hi!
On Thu, Feb 17, 2022, 11:00 AM Sandy Chacko <sandy.chacko@...> wrote:
I am a direct descendent of George Darling who was a SPOW and was sent to American colonies on the ship Unity and was and indentured servant at the Saugus Iron Works in Massachusetts.  This is what I currently have for my ancestral linkage to George Darling.

1. George Darling (1615-1693). 2. Jonathan Darling 1658-1716). 3. John Darling (1683-1735). 4. John Flanders Darling (1716-1795)
5. William Darling (1742-1812). 6. John Josiah Darling (1779-1868). 7. Robert Darling (abt 1809-1891) 8. Albro Edison Darling (1848-1941)
9. Robert David Darling (1871-1952). 10. Beulah Violet Rose Darling (1911-2003). 11. Joan Marie Draheim (1930-2009)
12. Sandra Chacko (Beermann-maiden name) (1952-)

I am excited to learn more about my ancestors.





Sandy Chacko
 

Thanks.  Looking forward to reading these books.

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 12:06 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:

To Sandy Chacko and others ... while there's lots available online, two terrific books are available on Amazon:

The Dunbar Martyrs: Scottish Prisoners of War in Durham Cathedral, 1650 | Webb, Simon
The Involuntary American: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World | Gardner, Carol

Mark Johnson

1. Malcolm MacCallum 1630-1683, SPOW, 8th great-grandfather
2. Caleb Callum 1664-1716
3. John Callum 1700-1754
4. Jemima Callum 1728-1776
.
.
.
11. Mark Everett Johnson 1956-

 


Joan Buell
 

I have learned that I am descended from four of those who were among the Scottish Prisoners of War:Purthe MackFarlan, who ended up in Hingham, MA, and three who went to Kittery Iron Works/sawmill in what was MA but is now Maine: James Warren, William Furbish, and John Neale. I have just started reading Lost Voices, New Lives to learn more!



On February 17, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Sandy Chacko <sandy.chacko@...> wrote:


Thanks.  Looking forward to reading these books.

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 12:06 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:

To Sandy Chacko and others ... while there's lots available online, two terrific books are available on Amazon:

The Dunbar Martyrs: Scottish Prisoners of War in Durham Cathedral, 1650 | Webb, Simon
The Involuntary American: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World | Gardner, Carol

Mark Johnson

1. Malcolm MacCallum 1630-1683, SPOW, 8th great-grandfather
2. Caleb Callum 1664-1716
3. John Callum 1700-1754
4. Jemima Callum 1728-1776
.
.
.
11. Mark Everett Johnson 1956-

 


Mark Johnson
 

Once freed, they were still strangers in a strange land. Little wonder this small band stayed close, and that one line of descendants would be traced to four SPOWs.


On Fri, Feb 18, 2022 at 4:38 PM Joan Buell <jhbuell@...> wrote:

I have learned that I am descended from four of those who were among the Scottish Prisoners of War:Purthe MackFarlan, who ended up in Hingham, MA, and three who went to Kittery Iron Works/sawmill in what was MA but is now Maine: James Warren, William Furbish, and John Neale. I have just started reading Lost Voices, New Lives to learn more!



On February 17, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Sandy Chacko <sandy.chacko@...> wrote:


Thanks.  Looking forward to reading these books.

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 12:06 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:

To Sandy Chacko and others ... while there's lots available online, two terrific books are available on Amazon:

The Dunbar Martyrs: Scottish Prisoners of War in Durham Cathedral, 1650 | Webb, Simon
The Involuntary American: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World | Gardner, Carol

Mark Johnson

1. Malcolm MacCallum 1630-1683, SPOW, 8th great-grandfather
2. Caleb Callum 1664-1716
3. John Callum 1700-1754
4. Jemima Callum 1728-1776
.
.
.
11. Mark Everett Johnson 1956-

 


Paul Kate's
 

I had never heard of the SPOWs until I did the Familytree Y dna test to find out more about my paternal ancestry. The results came back and said that at a genetic distance of 15 (about 350-400 years ago) my surname was Chisholm and they were Scottish.I called FTDNA and said that I can trace my ancestry to 1659 in Salisbury Ma. and they were English. He said dna does not lie and I said there weren't any Scottish people in America in 1659 and he said well I don't know what to tell you. That's when I came across the names of SPOWs on the Unity. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw prisoner #13 Duncan Chisholm. I then got a direct match to a known descendant named Chesemore- UNBELIEVABLE !
Almost 400 years later. Thanks to all who donate their time and effort to the SPOW Society.

On 02/18/2022 7:00 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:


Once freed, they were still strangers in a strange land. Little wonder this small band stayed close, and that one line of descendants would be traced to four SPOWs.

On Fri, Feb 18, 2022 at 4:38 PM Joan Buell <jhbuell@...> wrote:

I have learned that I am descended from four of those who were among the Scottish Prisoners of War:Purthe MackFarlan, who ended up in Hingham, MA, and three who went to Kittery Iron Works/sawmill in what was MA but is now Maine: James Warren, William Furbish, and John Neale. I have just started reading Lost Voices, New Lives to learn more!



On February 17, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Sandy Chacko <sandy.chacko@...> wrote:


Thanks.  Looking forward to reading these books.

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 12:06 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:

To Sandy Chacko and others ... while there's lots available online, two terrific books are available on Amazon:

The Dunbar Martyrs: Scottish Prisoners of War in Durham Cathedral, 1650 | Webb, Simon
The Involuntary American: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World | Gardner, Carol

Mark Johnson

1. Malcolm MacCallum 1630-1683, SPOW, 8th great-grandfather
2. Caleb Callum 1664-1716
3. John Callum 1700-1754
4. Jemima Callum 1728-1776
.
.
.
11. Mark Everett Johnson 1956-







Erica Hahn
 

Really cool.
I didn't have quite the same journey, but I found myself wondering why I had an ancestor in Connecticut in 1733 with a Scottish last name, McIntyre, and of course found my way to the prisoners brought over on the Unity.

On Friday, February 18, 2022, 10:01:17 PM PST, Paul Kate's <paulkates64@...> wrote:


I had never heard of the SPOWs until I did the Familytree Y dna test to find out more about my paternal ancestry. The results came back and said that at a genetic distance of 15 (about 350-400 years ago) my surname was Chisholm and they were Scottish.I called FTDNA and said that I can trace my ancestry to 1659 in Salisbury Ma. and they were English. He said dna does not lie and I said there weren't any Scottish people in America in 1659 and he said well I don't know what to tell you. That's when I came across the names of SPOWs on the Unity. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw prisoner #13 Duncan Chisholm. I then got a direct match to a known descendant named Chesemore- UNBELIEVABLE !
Almost 400 years later. Thanks to all who donate their time and effort to the SPOW Society.
On 02/18/2022 7:00 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:


Once freed, they were still strangers in a strange land. Little wonder this small band stayed close, and that one line of descendants would be traced to four SPOWs.

On Fri, Feb 18, 2022 at 4:38 PM Joan Buell <jhbuell@...> wrote:

I have learned that I am descended from four of those who were among the Scottish Prisoners of War:Purthe MackFarlan, who ended up in Hingham, MA, and three who went to Kittery Iron Works/sawmill in what was MA but is now Maine: James Warren, William Furbish, and John Neale. I have just started reading Lost Voices, New Lives to learn more!



On February 17, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Sandy Chacko <sandy.chacko@...> wrote:


Thanks.  Looking forward to reading these books.

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 12:06 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:

To Sandy Chacko and others ... while there's lots available online, two terrific books are available on Amazon:

The Dunbar Martyrs: Scottish Prisoners of War in Durham Cathedral, 1650 | Webb, Simon
The Involuntary American: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World | Gardner, Carol

Mark Johnson

1. Malcolm MacCallum 1630-1683, SPOW, 8th great-grandfather
2. Caleb Callum 1664-1716
3. John Callum 1700-1754
4. Jemima Callum 1728-1776
.
.
.
11. Mark Everett Johnson 1956-







Roger Burbank
 

Wow, l have tested Y DNA. I never got an actual surname.


On Sat, Feb 19, 2022 at 7:50 AM, Erica Hahn via groups.io
<ericalishahn@...> wrote:
Really cool.
I didn't have quite the same journey, but I found myself wondering why I had an ancestor in Connecticut in 1733 with a Scottish last name, McIntyre, and of course found my way to the prisoners brought over on the Unity.

On Friday, February 18, 2022, 10:01:17 PM PST, Paul Kate's <paulkates64@...> wrote:


I had never heard of the SPOWs until I did the Familytree Y dna test to find out more about my paternal ancestry. The results came back and said that at a genetic distance of 15 (about 350-400 years ago) my surname was Chisholm and they were Scottish.I called FTDNA and said that I can trace my ancestry to 1659 in Salisbury Ma. and they were English. He said dna does not lie and I said there weren't any Scottish people in America in 1659 and he said well I don't know what to tell you. That's when I came across the names of SPOWs on the Unity. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw prisoner #13 Duncan Chisholm. I then got a direct match to a known descendant named Chesemore- UNBELIEVABLE !
Almost 400 years later. Thanks to all who donate their time and effort to the SPOW Society.
On 02/18/2022 7:00 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:


Once freed, they were still strangers in a strange land. Little wonder this small band stayed close, and that one line of descendants would be traced to four SPOWs.

On Fri, Feb 18, 2022 at 4:38 PM Joan Buell <jhbuell@...> wrote:

I have learned that I am descended from four of those who were among the Scottish Prisoners of War:Purthe MackFarlan, who ended up in Hingham, MA, and three who went to Kittery Iron Works/sawmill in what was MA but is now Maine: James Warren, William Furbish, and John Neale. I have just started reading Lost Voices, New Lives to learn more!



On February 17, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Sandy Chacko <sandy.chacko@...> wrote:


Thanks.  Looking forward to reading these books.

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 12:06 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:

To Sandy Chacko and others ... while there's lots available online, two terrific books are available on Amazon:

The Dunbar Martyrs: Scottish Prisoners of War in Durham Cathedral, 1650 | Webb, Simon
The Involuntary American: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World | Gardner, Carol

Mark Johnson

1. Malcolm MacCallum 1630-1683, SPOW, 8th great-grandfather
2. Caleb Callum 1664-1716
3. John Callum 1700-1754
4. Jemima Callum 1728-1776
.
.
.
11. Mark Everett Johnson 1956-







Paul Kate's
 

I looked on FTDNA's website and it looks like they haven't created a project for the name Burbank yet. They are really helpful if you call them I'm sure they'll tell you how to go about it.
I'm learning more about Duncan. I believe he did his 7 years in the sawmills of Berwick or Kittery, then moved to Scarborough. I believe he was most likely killed by Indians and then his descendants moved down to Salisbury Ma. Most of my Chisholm matches said thieir ancestors came from the Strathglass area of the Highlands.

On 02/19/2022 11:12 AM Roger Burbank via groups.io <burby9@...> wrote:


Wow, l have tested Y DNA. I never got an actual surname.



On Sat, Feb 19, 2022 at 7:50 AM, Erica Hahn via groups.io
<ericalishahn@...> wrote:

Really cool.
I didn't have quite the same journey, but I found myself wondering why I had an ancestor in Connecticut in 1733 with a Scottish last name, McIntyre, and of course found my way to the prisoners brought over on the Unity.

On Friday, February 18, 2022, 10:01:17 PM PST, Paul Kate's <paulkates64@...> wrote:


I had never heard of the SPOWs until I did the Familytree Y dna test to find out more about my paternal ancestry. The results came back and said that at a genetic distance of 15 (about 350-400 years ago) my surname was Chisholm and they were Scottish.I called FTDNA and said that I can trace my ancestry to 1659 in Salisbury Ma. and they were English. He said dna does not lie and I said there weren't any Scottish people in America in 1659 and he said well I don't know what to tell you. That's when I came across the names of SPOWs on the Unity. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw prisoner #13 Duncan Chisholm. I then got a direct match to a known descendant named Chesemore- UNBELIEVABLE !
Almost 400 years later. Thanks to all who donate their time and effort to the SPOW Society.
On 02/18/2022 7:00 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:


Once freed, they were still strangers in a strange land. Little wonder this small band stayed close, and that one line of descendants would be traced to four SPOWs.

On Fri, Feb 18, 2022 at 4:38 PM Joan Buell <jhbuell@...> wrote:

I have learned that I am descended from four of those who were among the Scottish Prisoners of War:Purthe MackFarlan, who ended up in Hingham, MA, and three who went to Kittery Iron Works/sawmill in what was MA but is now Maine: James Warren, William Furbish, and John Neale. I have just started reading Lost Voices, New Lives to learn more!



On February 17, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Sandy Chacko <sandy.chacko@...> wrote:


Thanks.  Looking forward to reading these books.

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 12:06 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:

To Sandy Chacko and others ... while there's lots available online, two terrific books are available on Amazon:

The Dunbar Martyrs: Scottish Prisoners of War in Durham Cathedral, 1650 | Webb, Simon
The Involuntary American: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World | Gardner, Carol

Mark Johnson

1. Malcolm MacCallum 1630-1683, SPOW, 8th great-grandfather
2. Caleb Callum 1664-1716
3. John Callum 1700-1754
4. Jemima Callum 1728-1776
.
.
.
11. Mark Everett Johnson 1956-









LauraDove Rippon
 

Joan! I am also directly descended from John Neale and William Furbush(-bish)!
Hello cousin!
I'd be interested in seeing your line, if you want to email me directly or put it in here 
 
Mine is:
William Furbush John Neale
          | |
Catherine Furb. m. Andrew Neale
                            |
                  John Neale
                            |
                James Neale
                            |
               Samuel Neale
                            |
               David S. Neal
                            |
            N. Frederick Neal
                            |
L. Mildred Neal m. Harold Rippon
                            |
              Windsor Rippon
                            |
       Laura (b.Lisa) D. Rippon
 
The Neal(e) last name dropped after Fred, as he had 2 daughters so no one to carry on the name.


Roger Burbank
 

Thank you.  I would be a Burbach.  The good old name change.  R

On Saturday, February 19, 2022, 09:42:55 AM PST, Paul Kate's <paulkates64@...> wrote:


I looked on FTDNA's website and it looks like they haven't created a project for the name Burbank yet. They are really helpful if you call them I'm sure they'll tell you how to go about it.
I'm learning more about Duncan. I believe he did his 7 years in the sawmills of Berwick or Kittery, then moved to Scarborough. I believe he was most likely killed by Indians and then his descendants moved down to Salisbury Ma. Most of my Chisholm matches said thieir ancestors came from the Strathglass area of the Highlands.

On 02/19/2022 11:12 AM Roger Burbank via groups.io <burby9@...> wrote:


Wow, l have tested Y DNA. I never got an actual surname.



On Sat, Feb 19, 2022 at 7:50 AM, Erica Hahn via groups.io
<ericalishahn@...> wrote:

Really cool.
I didn't have quite the same journey, but I found myself wondering why I had an ancestor in Connecticut in 1733 with a Scottish last name, McIntyre, and of course found my way to the prisoners brought over on the Unity.

On Friday, February 18, 2022, 10:01:17 PM PST, Paul Kate's <paulkates64@...> wrote:


I had never heard of the SPOWs until I did the Familytree Y dna test to find out more about my paternal ancestry. The results came back and said that at a genetic distance of 15 (about 350-400 years ago) my surname was Chisholm and they were Scottish.I called FTDNA and said that I can trace my ancestry to 1659 in Salisbury Ma. and they were English. He said dna does not lie and I said there weren't any Scottish people in America in 1659 and he said well I don't know what to tell you. That's when I came across the names of SPOWs on the Unity. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw prisoner #13 Duncan Chisholm. I then got a direct match to a known descendant named Chesemore- UNBELIEVABLE !
Almost 400 years later. Thanks to all who donate their time and effort to the SPOW Society.
On 02/18/2022 7:00 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:


Once freed, they were still strangers in a strange land. Little wonder this small band stayed close, and that one line of descendants would be traced to four SPOWs.

On Fri, Feb 18, 2022 at 4:38 PM Joan Buell <jhbuell@...> wrote:

I have learned that I am descended from four of those who were among the Scottish Prisoners of War:Purthe MackFarlan, who ended up in Hingham, MA, and three who went to Kittery Iron Works/sawmill in what was MA but is now Maine: James Warren, William Furbish, and John Neale. I have just started reading Lost Voices, New Lives to learn more!



On February 17, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Sandy Chacko <sandy.chacko@...> wrote:


Thanks.  Looking forward to reading these books.

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 12:06 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:

To Sandy Chacko and others ... while there's lots available online, two terrific books are available on Amazon:

The Dunbar Martyrs: Scottish Prisoners of War in Durham Cathedral, 1650 | Webb, Simon
The Involuntary American: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World | Gardner, Carol

Mark Johnson

1. Malcolm MacCallum 1630-1683, SPOW, 8th great-grandfather
2. Caleb Callum 1664-1716
3. John Callum 1700-1754
4. Jemima Callum 1728-1776
.
.
.
11. Mark Everett Johnson 1956-









Mark Johnson
 

Someone asked about the two books I recommended whether they could expect to find their ancestor's name in them. The answer is probably not, but the fact is that records about any of these specific individuals are hard to find. However, what you will gain from these books is knowledge of your ancestor's shared experiences ... which in some ways may be more informative than finding their personal names. Hope this helps!


sarah joliat
 

Joan,

I am also descended from William Furbish and William Alexander Gowen. They are both my grandfathers 11 generations back. Fascinating history of the start to our country…and I never learned about any of this growing up in school. It is better than any historical fiction book you could find. 

Sarah


On Feb 19, 2022, at 1:01 AM, Paul Kate's <paulkates64@...> wrote:


I had never heard of the SPOWs until I did the Familytree Y dna test to find out more about my paternal ancestry. The results came back and said that at a genetic distance of 15 (about 350-400 years ago) my surname was Chisholm and they were Scottish.I called FTDNA and said that I can trace my ancestry to 1659 in Salisbury Ma. and they were English. He said dna does not lie and I said there weren't any Scottish people in America in 1659 and he said well I don't know what to tell you. That's when I came across the names of SPOWs on the Unity. I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw prisoner #13 Duncan Chisholm. I then got a direct match to a known descendant named Chesemore- UNBELIEVABLE !
Almost 400 years later. Thanks to all who donate their time and effort to the SPOW Society.
On 02/18/2022 7:00 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:


Once freed, they were still strangers in a strange land. Little wonder this small band stayed close, and that one line of descendants would be traced to four SPOWs.

On Fri, Feb 18, 2022 at 4:38 PM Joan Buell <jhbuell@...> wrote:

I have learned that I am descended from four of those who were among the Scottish Prisoners of War:Purthe MackFarlan, who ended up in Hingham, MA, and three who went to Kittery Iron Works/sawmill in what was MA but is now Maine: James Warren, William Furbish, and John Neale. I have just started reading Lost Voices, New Lives to learn more!



On February 17, 2022, at 1:47 PM, Sandy Chacko <sandy.chacko@...> wrote:


Thanks.  Looking forward to reading these books.

On Thu, Feb 17, 2022 at 12:06 PM Mark Johnson <mejcopy@...> wrote:

To Sandy Chacko and others ... while there's lots available online, two terrific books are available on Amazon:

The Dunbar Martyrs: Scottish Prisoners of War in Durham Cathedral, 1650 | Webb, Simon
The Involuntary American: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World | Gardner, Carol

Mark Johnson

1. Malcolm MacCallum 1630-1683, SPOW, 8th great-grandfather
2. Caleb Callum 1664-1716
3. John Callum 1700-1754
4. Jemima Callum 1728-1776
.
.
.
11. Mark Everett Johnson 1956-







Andrew Millard
 

Our book Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650 covers most of the material that is in Simon Webb’s book, which in parts is closely based on our preliminary research reports. Our book does have a lot of information about some individuals and their lives in New England, and a list in Appendix B which is a comprehensive list as possible of men who may have been on the Unity.

 

US sales: https://www.oxbowbooks.com/dbbc/lost-lives-new-voices.html

UK sales: https://www.oxbowbooks.com/oxbow/lost-lives-new-voices.html

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Johnson via groups.io
Sent: 20 February 2022 01:55
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Introduction

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Someone asked about the two books I recommended whether they could expect to find their ancestor's name in them. The answer is probably not, but the fact is that records about any of these specific individuals are hard to find. However, what you will gain from these books is knowledge of your ancestor's shared experiences ... which in some ways may be more informative than finding their personal names. Hope this helps!


S Ray
 

Lost Lives is also available as a book and ebook on Amazon. 


On Mon, Feb 21, 2022, 9:56 AM Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:

Our book Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650 covers most of the material that is in Simon Webb’s book, which in parts is closely based on our preliminary research reports. Our book does have a lot of information about some individuals and their lives in New England, and a list in Appendix B which is a comprehensive list as possible of men who may have been on the Unity.

 

US sales: https://www.oxbowbooks.com/dbbc/lost-lives-new-voices.html

UK sales: https://www.oxbowbooks.com/oxbow/lost-lives-new-voices.html

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Johnson via groups.io
Sent: 20 February 2022 01:55
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Introduction

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Someone asked about the two books I recommended whether they could expect to find their ancestor's name in them. The answer is probably not, but the fact is that records about any of these specific individuals are hard to find. However, what you will gain from these books is knowledge of your ancestor's shared experiences ... which in some ways may be more informative than finding their personal names. Hope this helps!


Doug Cahoon
 

This is great Andrew. - Also B&N as a Nook e-book if anyone uses that anymore.

On Monday, February 21, 2022, 10:23:28 AM MST, S Ray <graymond1314@...> wrote:


Lost Lives is also available as a book and ebook on Amazon. 

On Mon, Feb 21, 2022, 9:56 AM Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:

Our book Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650 covers most of the material that is in Simon Webb’s book, which in parts is closely based on our preliminary research reports. Our book does have a lot of information about some individuals and their lives in New England, and a list in Appendix B which is a comprehensive list as possible of men who may have been on the Unity.

 

US sales: https://www.oxbowbooks.com/dbbc/lost-lives-new-voices.html

UK sales: https://www.oxbowbooks.com/oxbow/lost-lives-new-voices.html

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Johnson via groups.io
Sent: 20 February 2022 01:55
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Introduction

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Someone asked about the two books I recommended whether they could expect to find their ancestor's name in them. The answer is probably not, but the fact is that records about any of these specific individuals are hard to find. However, what you will gain from these books is knowledge of your ancestor's shared experiences ... which in some ways may be more informative than finding their personal names. Hope this helps!


Andrew Millard
 

Also other ebook formats. There are links to several on those pages.

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of Doug Cahoon via groups.io
Sent: 21 February 2022 17:52
To: scottishprisonersofwarsociety@groups.io; ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Introduction

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

This is great Andrew. - Also B&N as a Nook e-book if anyone uses that anymore.

 

On Monday, February 21, 2022, 10:23:28 AM MST, S Ray <graymond1314@...> wrote:

 

 

Lost Lives is also available as a book and ebook on Amazon. 

 

On Mon, Feb 21, 2022, 9:56 AM Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:

Our book Lost Lives, New Voices: Unlocking the Stories of the Scottish Soldiers at the Battle of Dunbar 1650 covers most of the material that is in Simon Webb’s book, which in parts is closely based on our preliminary research reports. Our book does have a lot of information about some individuals and their lives in New England, and a list in Appendix B which is a comprehensive list as possible of men who may have been on the Unity.

 

US sales: https://www.oxbowbooks.com/dbbc/lost-lives-new-voices.html

UK sales: https://www.oxbowbooks.com/oxbow/lost-lives-new-voices.html

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Johnson via groups.io
Sent: 20 February 2022 01:55
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Introduction

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Someone asked about the two books I recommended whether they could expect to find their ancestor's name in them. The answer is probably not, but the fact is that records about any of these specific individuals are hard to find. However, what you will gain from these books is knowledge of your ancestor's shared experiences ... which in some ways may be more informative than finding their personal names. Hope this helps!