Date   

Re: Alexander Bow descendent --Barbados

Eleanor Hall
 

Attached is some information on the Scots going to Barbados. I don't think there is any listing of them by name. 

My ancestor was Ninian Beall, a SPOW who was sent to Barbados, then had his indenture bought and went to Maryland.

Eleanor Hall

On Wednesday, February 24, 2021, 02:10:19 AM CST, Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:


Dear Nancy,

 

I’m not aware of any passenger lists except the John and Sara. For some reason that got copied into the Suffolk County register of deeds, but making lists, keeping them and enrolling them don’t seem to have been regular activities.

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nancy Magruder via groups.io
Sent: 23 February 2021 20:12
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io; ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Andrew,

    I was curious to know if you are familiar with any ships that took SPOWs from England to America, via Barbados in 1651 after the battle of Worchester.  My ancestor is Alexander MacGregor who was captured at the Battle of Worchester and sent to America via Barbados.  I am familiar with the manifest of the John & Sara from 1650 Dunbar Battle but I have not been able to find any ship manifest naming SPOW for Worchester 1651.  Any ideas?

 

Thank you,  Nancy

 

Nancy Magruder Lovelaguna@...

 

 

On Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 12:42:27 AM PST, Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:

 

 

Hello and welcome mccarpenter,

 

The Society web site has a limited set of information about Alexander at https://spows.org/battle-of-dunbar/battle-of-dunbar-prisoners-of-war/battle-of-dunbar-prisoner-profiles/alexander-bow/

A lot more detail is given on this site https://alexanderbow.com/alexander/

As far as I know he is never explicitly said to be Scottish in contemporary records, but his land grant on the same day and adjacent to other known Scots strongly suggests it.

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of mccarpenter via groups.io
Sent: 23 February 2021 04:37
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Hello. I recently discovered that Alexander Bow is my ancestor (b. 1605, d. Nov. 6, 1678 in Middleton, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USA).  I am looking for any information about him. All I know is he was born in Scotland (some sources say "possibly born in Scotland") and he may have been one of the SPOW. 
I also have Forbes and Grant connections. 
I am looking forward to discovering more here! 


Re: Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

Andrew Millard
 

Dear Nancy,

 

I’m not aware of any passenger lists except the John and Sara. For some reason that got copied into the Suffolk County register of deeds, but making lists, keeping them and enrolling them don’t seem to have been regular activities.

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nancy Magruder via groups.io
Sent: 23 February 2021 20:12
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io; ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Andrew,

    I was curious to know if you are familiar with any ships that took SPOWs from England to America, via Barbados in 1651 after the battle of Worchester.  My ancestor is Alexander MacGregor who was captured at the Battle of Worchester and sent to America via Barbados.  I am familiar with the manifest of the John & Sara from 1650 Dunbar Battle but I have not been able to find any ship manifest naming SPOW for Worchester 1651.  Any ideas?

 

Thank you,  Nancy

 

Nancy Magruder Lovelaguna@...

 

 

On Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 12:42:27 AM PST, Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:

 

 

Hello and welcome mccarpenter,

 

The Society web site has a limited set of information about Alexander at https://spows.org/battle-of-dunbar/battle-of-dunbar-prisoners-of-war/battle-of-dunbar-prisoner-profiles/alexander-bow/

A lot more detail is given on this site https://alexanderbow.com/alexander/

As far as I know he is never explicitly said to be Scottish in contemporary records, but his land grant on the same day and adjacent to other known Scots strongly suggests it.

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of mccarpenter via groups.io
Sent: 23 February 2021 04:37
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Hello. I recently discovered that Alexander Bow is my ancestor (b. 1605, d. Nov. 6, 1678 in Middleton, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USA).  I am looking for any information about him. All I know is he was born in Scotland (some sources say "possibly born in Scotland") and he may have been one of the SPOW. 
I also have Forbes and Grant connections. 
I am looking forward to discovering more here! 


Re: SPOW Duncan Chisholm

Paul Kate's
 

Also it says on the website that it is "possible" that Duncan Chisholm is a SPOW from Dunbar because he "appears quite late in 1667". but yet he actually appears in court records in 1659 in Scarborough Maine where he is "fined for fighting fellow Scot John McKenney".
Can anyone tell me how to go about getting that changed to "probable"?

On 02/23/2021 11:04 AM Paul Kate's <paulkates64@...> wrote:
 
 
Hello everyone,
I was wondering if anyone could help me locate a male descendant of SPOW Duncan Chisholm that would be willing to join the Scotts Prisoners Y dna project. I am kit #887186. I can trace my paternal line back to a Robert Roe in born about 1659 in Salisbury Ma. Robert had a son with Mary Paine, Robert Rowe Jr who became an indentured servant for Capt. Joseph Swett. Familytreedna placed me in the Chisholm surname and said that at a GD of about 350-400 years ago their is a 98% chance my surname was Chisholm. This is why I believe I am a descendant of Duncan's.
Thanks for any help 
Paul Kates
On 02/23/2021 3:42 AM Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:
 
 

Hello and welcome mccarpenter,

 

The Society web site has a limited set of information about Alexander at https://spows.org/battle-of-dunbar/battle-of-dunbar-prisoners-of-war/battle-of-dunbar-prisoner-profiles/alexander-bow/

A lot more detail is given on this site https://alexanderbow.com/alexander/

As far as I know he is never explicitly said to be Scottish in contemporary records, but his land grant on the same day and adjacent to other known Scots strongly suggests it.

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of mccarpenter via groups.io
Sent: 23 February 2021 04:37
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Hello. I recently discovered that Alexander Bow is my ancestor (b. 1605, d. Nov. 6, 1678 in Middleton, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USA).  I am looking for any information about him. All I know is he was born in Scotland (some sources say "possibly born in Scotland") and he may have been one of the SPOW. 
I also have Forbes and Grant connections. 
I am looking forward to discovering more here! 

 


Duncan Chisholm

Paul Kate's
 

Thanks again Roland. I am going to look into MH dna and also the Scottish Genelogical Society.
It would be incredible if after almost 400 years my Y DNA proved that Duncan Chisholm was Robert Roe's father. There are hundreds of Rowe descendants that have no idea their real name is Chisholm and that they are a descendant of a Scottish POW from the Battle of Dunbar.

On 02/23/2021 5:01 PM Mark Abernathy via groups.io <markabernathy@...> wrote:
 
 
I also heard our family member came through the Barbados to Jamestown, Robert Abernathy.   I have a copy of his will near Jamestown. 
 
So far no one can find any documentation that supports this.

 

On Feb 23, 2021, at 14:37, Nancy Magruder via groups.io <lovelaguna@...> wrote:

Andrew,
    I was curious to know if you are familiar with any ships that took SPOWs from England to America, via Barbados in 1651 after the battle of Worchester.  My ancestor is Alexander MacGregor who was captured at the Battle of Worchester and sent to America via Barbados.  I am familiar with the manifest of the John & Sara from 1650 Dunbar Battle but I have not been able to find any ship manifest naming SPOW for Worchester 1651.  Any ideas?
 
Thank you,  Nancy
 
Nancy Magruder Lovelaguna@...
 
 
On Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 12:42:27 AM PST, Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:
 
 

Hello and welcome mccarpenter,

 

The Society web site has a limited set of information about Alexander at https://spows.org/battle-of-dunbar/battle-of-dunbar-prisoners-of-war/battle-of-dunbar-prisoner-profiles/alexander-bow/

A lot more detail is given on this site https://alexanderbow.com/alexander/

As far as I know he is never explicitly said to be Scottish in contemporary records, but his land grant on the same day and adjacent to other known Scots strongly suggests it.

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of mccarpenter via groups.io
Sent: 23 February 2021 04:37
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Hello. I recently discovered that Alexander Bow is my ancestor (b. 1605, d. Nov. 6, 1678 in Middleton, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USA).  I am looking for any information about him. All I know is he was born in Scotland (some sources say "possibly born in Scotland") and he may have been one of the SPOW. 
I also have Forbes and Grant connections. 
I am looking forward to discovering more here! 

 

 


Re: Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

Mark Abernathy
 

I also heard our family member came through the Barbados to Jamestown, Robert Abernathy.   I have a copy of his will near Jamestown. 

So far no one can find any documentation that supports this.


On Feb 23, 2021, at 14:37, Nancy Magruder via groups.io <lovelaguna@...> wrote:


Andrew,
    I was curious to know if you are familiar with any ships that took SPOWs from England to America, via Barbados in 1651 after the battle of Worchester.  My ancestor is Alexander MacGregor who was captured at the Battle of Worchester and sent to America via Barbados.  I am familiar with the manifest of the John & Sara from 1650 Dunbar Battle but I have not been able to find any ship manifest naming SPOW for Worchester 1651.  Any ideas?

Thank you,  Nancy

Nancy Magruder Lovelaguna@...


On Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 12:42:27 AM PST, Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:


Hello and welcome mccarpenter,

 

The Society web site has a limited set of information about Alexander at https://spows.org/battle-of-dunbar/battle-of-dunbar-prisoners-of-war/battle-of-dunbar-prisoner-profiles/alexander-bow/

A lot more detail is given on this site https://alexanderbow.com/alexander/

As far as I know he is never explicitly said to be Scottish in contemporary records, but his land grant on the same day and adjacent to other known Scots strongly suggests it.

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of mccarpenter via groups.io
Sent: 23 February 2021 04:37
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Hello. I recently discovered that Alexander Bow is my ancestor (b. 1605, d. Nov. 6, 1678 in Middleton, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USA).  I am looking for any information about him. All I know is he was born in Scotland (some sources say "possibly born in Scotland") and he may have been one of the SPOW. 
I also have Forbes and Grant connections. 
I am looking forward to discovering more here! 


Re: Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

Nancy Magruder
 

Andrew,
    I was curious to know if you are familiar with any ships that took SPOWs from England to America, via Barbados in 1651 after the battle of Worchester.  My ancestor is Alexander MacGregor who was captured at the Battle of Worchester and sent to America via Barbados.  I am familiar with the manifest of the John & Sara from 1650 Dunbar Battle but I have not been able to find any ship manifest naming SPOW for Worchester 1651.  Any ideas?

Thank you,  Nancy

Nancy Magruder Lovelaguna@...


On Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 12:42:27 AM PST, Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:


Hello and welcome mccarpenter,

 

The Society web site has a limited set of information about Alexander at https://spows.org/battle-of-dunbar/battle-of-dunbar-prisoners-of-war/battle-of-dunbar-prisoner-profiles/alexander-bow/

A lot more detail is given on this site https://alexanderbow.com/alexander/

As far as I know he is never explicitly said to be Scottish in contemporary records, but his land grant on the same day and adjacent to other known Scots strongly suggests it.

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of mccarpenter via groups.io
Sent: 23 February 2021 04:37
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Hello. I recently discovered that Alexander Bow is my ancestor (b. 1605, d. Nov. 6, 1678 in Middleton, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USA).  I am looking for any information about him. All I know is he was born in Scotland (some sources say "possibly born in Scotland") and he may have been one of the SPOW. 
I also have Forbes and Grant connections. 
I am looking forward to discovering more here! 


SPOW Duncan Chisholm

Paul Kate's
 

Hello everyone,
I was wondering if anyone could help me locate a male descendant of SPOW Duncan Chisholm that would be willing to join the Scotts Prisoners Y dna project. I am kit #887186. I can trace my paternal line back to a Robert Roe in born about 1659 in Salisbury Ma. Robert had a son with Mary Paine, Robert Rowe Jr who became an indentured servant for Capt. Joseph Swett. Familytreedna placed me in the Chisholm surname and said that at a GD of about 350-400 years ago their is a 98% chance my surname was Chisholm. This is why I believe I am a descendant of Duncan's.
Thanks for any help 
Paul Kates

On 02/23/2021 3:42 AM Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:
 
 

Hello and welcome mccarpenter,

 

The Society web site has a limited set of information about Alexander at https://spows.org/battle-of-dunbar/battle-of-dunbar-prisoners-of-war/battle-of-dunbar-prisoner-profiles/alexander-bow/

A lot more detail is given on this site https://alexanderbow.com/alexander/

As far as I know he is never explicitly said to be Scottish in contemporary records, but his land grant on the same day and adjacent to other known Scots strongly suggests it.

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of mccarpenter via groups.io
Sent: 23 February 2021 04:37
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Hello. I recently discovered that Alexander Bow is my ancestor (b. 1605, d. Nov. 6, 1678 in Middleton, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USA).  I am looking for any information about him. All I know is he was born in Scotland (some sources say "possibly born in Scotland") and he may have been one of the SPOW. 
I also have Forbes and Grant connections. 
I am looking forward to discovering more here! 

 


Re: Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

Andrew Millard
 

Hello and welcome mccarpenter,

 

The Society web site has a limited set of information about Alexander at https://spows.org/battle-of-dunbar/battle-of-dunbar-prisoners-of-war/battle-of-dunbar-prisoner-profiles/alexander-bow/

A lot more detail is given on this site https://alexanderbow.com/alexander/

As far as I know he is never explicitly said to be Scottish in contemporary records, but his land grant on the same day and adjacent to other known Scots strongly suggests it.

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/directory/profile/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 

From: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io <ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io> On Behalf Of mccarpenter via groups.io
Sent: 23 February 2021 04:37
To: ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety@groups.io
Subject: [ScottishPrisonersofWarSociety] Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

 

[EXTERNAL EMAIL]

Hello. I recently discovered that Alexander Bow is my ancestor (b. 1605, d. Nov. 6, 1678 in Middleton, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USA).  I am looking for any information about him. All I know is he was born in Scotland (some sources say "possibly born in Scotland") and he may have been one of the SPOW. 
I also have Forbes and Grant connections. 
I am looking forward to discovering more here! 


Alexander Bow descendent #Introductions

mccarpenter@...
 

Hello. I recently discovered that Alexander Bow is my ancestor (b. 1605, d. Nov. 6, 1678 in Middleton, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USA).  I am looking for any information about him. All I know is he was born in Scotland (some sources say "possibly born in Scotland") and he may have been one of the SPOW. 
I also have Forbes and Grant connections. 
I am looking forward to discovering more here! 


Re: New paper from Durham Scottish Soldiers project

Nelda Gallerano
 

Merry Christmas Andrew! Thank you for forwarding this!  I can’t wait to find a quiet moment and geek out on your new paper!  Especially on the teeth!  Hope you and your family are safe during these trying times!  

Nelda Upton Gallerano


On Dec 22, 2020, at 9:10 AM, Doug Cahoon via groups.io <doug_cahoon@...> wrote:

Thanks Andrew.

On Tuesday, December 22, 2020, 03:54:35 AM MST, Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:


I’m please to announce the latest paper from the Durham University Scottish Soldiers Project.

 

Scottish soldiers from the Battle of Dunbar 1650: A prosopographical approach to a skeletal assemblage

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0243369

 

This is a long paper, including some quite technical parts, covering the scientific analyses carried out on the skeletons found at Palace Green Durham in 2013. Here’s the abstract:

After the Battle Dunbar between English and Scottish forces in 1650, captured Scottish soldiers were imprisoned in Durham and many hundreds died there within a few weeks. The partial skeletal remains of 28 of these men were discovered in 2013. Building on previous osteological work, here we report wide-ranging scientific studies of the remains to address the following questions: Did they have comparable diet, health and disease throughout their lives? Did they have common histories of movement (or lack of movement) during their childhoods? Can we create a collective biography of these men? Strontium and oxygen isotope analysis of tooth enamel investigated childhood movement. Carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of incrementally sampled dentine addressed childhood diet and nutrition. Metaproteomic analysis of dental calculus investigated oral microbiomes and food residues; this was complemented by microscopic analysis of debris in calculus from ingested materials. Selected individuals were examined for dental microwear. The extent of hydroxylation of proline in collagen was examined as a potential biomarker for scurvy. An osteobiography for each man was created using the full range of data generated about him, and these were synthesised using an approach based on the historical method for a collective biography or prosopography. The childhood residences of the men were primarily within the Midland Valley of Scotland, though some spent parts of their childhood outside the British Isles. This is concordant with the known recruitment areas of the Scottish army in 1650. Their diets included oats, brassicas and milk but little seafood, as expected for lowland rather than highland diets of the period. Childhood periods of starvation or illness were almost ubiquitous, but not simultaneous, suggesting regionally variable food shortages in the 1620s and 1630s. It is likely there was widespread low-level scurvy, ameliorating in later years of life, which suggests historically unrecorded shortages of fruit and vegetables in the early 1640s. Almost all men were exposed to burnt plant matter, probably as inhaled soot, and this may relate to the high proportion of them with of sinusitis. Interpersonal violence causing skeletal trauma was rare. Based on commonalities in their osteobiographies, we argue that these men were drawn from the same stratum of society. This study is perhaps the most extensive to date of individuals from 17th century Scotland. Combined with a precise historical context it allows the lives of these men to be investigated and compared to the historical record with unprecedented precision. It illustrates the power of archaeological science methods to confirm, challenge and complement historical evidence.

 

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/archaeology/staff/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 


Re: New paper from Durham Scottish Soldiers project

Doug Cahoon
 

Thanks Andrew.

On Tuesday, December 22, 2020, 03:54:35 AM MST, Andrew Millard <a.r.millard@...> wrote:


I’m please to announce the latest paper from the Durham University Scottish Soldiers Project.

 

Scottish soldiers from the Battle of Dunbar 1650: A prosopographical approach to a skeletal assemblage

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0243369

 

This is a long paper, including some quite technical parts, covering the scientific analyses carried out on the skeletons found at Palace Green Durham in 2013. Here’s the abstract:

After the Battle Dunbar between English and Scottish forces in 1650, captured Scottish soldiers were imprisoned in Durham and many hundreds died there within a few weeks. The partial skeletal remains of 28 of these men were discovered in 2013. Building on previous osteological work, here we report wide-ranging scientific studies of the remains to address the following questions: Did they have comparable diet, health and disease throughout their lives? Did they have common histories of movement (or lack of movement) during their childhoods? Can we create a collective biography of these men? Strontium and oxygen isotope analysis of tooth enamel investigated childhood movement. Carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of incrementally sampled dentine addressed childhood diet and nutrition. Metaproteomic analysis of dental calculus investigated oral microbiomes and food residues; this was complemented by microscopic analysis of debris in calculus from ingested materials. Selected individuals were examined for dental microwear. The extent of hydroxylation of proline in collagen was examined as a potential biomarker for scurvy. An osteobiography for each man was created using the full range of data generated about him, and these were synthesised using an approach based on the historical method for a collective biography or prosopography. The childhood residences of the men were primarily within the Midland Valley of Scotland, though some spent parts of their childhood outside the British Isles. This is concordant with the known recruitment areas of the Scottish army in 1650. Their diets included oats, brassicas and milk but little seafood, as expected for lowland rather than highland diets of the period. Childhood periods of starvation or illness were almost ubiquitous, but not simultaneous, suggesting regionally variable food shortages in the 1620s and 1630s. It is likely there was widespread low-level scurvy, ameliorating in later years of life, which suggests historically unrecorded shortages of fruit and vegetables in the early 1640s. Almost all men were exposed to burnt plant matter, probably as inhaled soot, and this may relate to the high proportion of them with of sinusitis. Interpersonal violence causing skeletal trauma was rare. Based on commonalities in their osteobiographies, we argue that these men were drawn from the same stratum of society. This study is perhaps the most extensive to date of individuals from 17th century Scotland. Combined with a precise historical context it allows the lives of these men to be investigated and compared to the historical record with unprecedented precision. It illustrates the power of archaeological science methods to confirm, challenge and complement historical evidence.

 

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/archaeology/staff/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 


New paper from Durham Scottish Soldiers project

Andrew Millard
 

I’m please to announce the latest paper from the Durham University Scottish Soldiers Project.

 

Scottish soldiers from the Battle of Dunbar 1650: A prosopographical approach to a skeletal assemblage

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0243369

 

This is a long paper, including some quite technical parts, covering the scientific analyses carried out on the skeletons found at Palace Green Durham in 2013. Here’s the abstract:

After the Battle Dunbar between English and Scottish forces in 1650, captured Scottish soldiers were imprisoned in Durham and many hundreds died there within a few weeks. The partial skeletal remains of 28 of these men were discovered in 2013. Building on previous osteological work, here we report wide-ranging scientific studies of the remains to address the following questions: Did they have comparable diet, health and disease throughout their lives? Did they have common histories of movement (or lack of movement) during their childhoods? Can we create a collective biography of these men? Strontium and oxygen isotope analysis of tooth enamel investigated childhood movement. Carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of incrementally sampled dentine addressed childhood diet and nutrition. Metaproteomic analysis of dental calculus investigated oral microbiomes and food residues; this was complemented by microscopic analysis of debris in calculus from ingested materials. Selected individuals were examined for dental microwear. The extent of hydroxylation of proline in collagen was examined as a potential biomarker for scurvy. An osteobiography for each man was created using the full range of data generated about him, and these were synthesised using an approach based on the historical method for a collective biography or prosopography. The childhood residences of the men were primarily within the Midland Valley of Scotland, though some spent parts of their childhood outside the British Isles. This is concordant with the known recruitment areas of the Scottish army in 1650. Their diets included oats, brassicas and milk but little seafood, as expected for lowland rather than highland diets of the period. Childhood periods of starvation or illness were almost ubiquitous, but not simultaneous, suggesting regionally variable food shortages in the 1620s and 1630s. It is likely there was widespread low-level scurvy, ameliorating in later years of life, which suggests historically unrecorded shortages of fruit and vegetables in the early 1640s. Almost all men were exposed to burnt plant matter, probably as inhaled soot, and this may relate to the high proportion of them with of sinusitis. Interpersonal violence causing skeletal trauma was rare. Based on commonalities in their osteobiographies, we argue that these men were drawn from the same stratum of society. This study is perhaps the most extensive to date of individuals from 17th century Scotland. Combined with a precise historical context it allows the lives of these men to be investigated and compared to the historical record with unprecedented precision. It illustrates the power of archaeological science methods to confirm, challenge and complement historical evidence.

 

 

Best wishes

Andrew

--

Dr. Andrew Millard

Associate Professor of Archaeology, and

Designated Individual under the Human Tissue Act,

Durham University, UK

Email: A.R.Millard@... 

Personal page: https://www.dur.ac.uk/archaeology/staff/?id=160

Scottish Soldiers Project: https://www.dur.ac.uk/scottishsoldiers

Dunbar 1650 MOOC: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/battle-of-dunbar-1650

 

 


Introduction #Introductions

PattieRNBSN@...
 

Hello,
It doesn’t look as though I have ever introduced myself here.  I am Patricia MacBean-Puchino.  I am a descendant of John Bean and Henry Magoon.  I had thought I was also a descendant of John Magoon but I’m not so sure now.
be well
--
Cheers,

P. Grace MacBean-Puchino


Re: Introduction - Call Upon the Water

PattieRNBSN@...
 

Thanks Diane!--
Cheers,

P. Grace MacBean-Puchino


Re: Introduction - Call Upon the Water

NozemUK@...
 

Thank you Diane, indeed, had a look at the publisher's webpage on the novel . It is the same book ! 

https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Call-Upon-the-Water/Stella-Tillyard/9781982120962 


Re: Introduction - Call Upon the Water

Diane Schroeder
 

I have a hard back copy of the book I was given for Christmas last year.  When I looked at Amazon US there is a book by Stella Tillyard called The Great Level which appears to be the same book just with a different title.  This happens between the US and UK publications some time.   Diane


Re: Introduction - Call Upon the Water

NozemUK@...
 

Thank you.for sharing. I have found this book on 'Amazon UK' , says not published until 8th December 2020. Did you get an advance copy? Sounds interesting. 


Re: Introduction - Call Upon the Water

Teresa (Hamilton/Pepper) Rust
 

Thanks for sharing!

On Wed, Oct 14, 2020 at 10:50 AM Diane Schroeder <dianerae45@...> wrote:
Welcome. I've been intending to share this for a while so you're question was timely.  I recently finished Call Upon the Water by Stella Tillyard.  Set in England and America in the seventeenth century, I was pleasantly surprised to find that a group of Scottish prisoners of war playing a role in the draining of the British wetlands that is central to the story.  While none of the prisoners play a central role in the narrative, it was really interesting to see how our relatives in other other historic events.  A main character who is not a Scottish prisoner is sent to the colonies as an indentured servant along with other prisoners. It is an interesting story and very well written.  If you enjoy good fiction I recommend it.  Regards 



--
Teresa (Hamilton/Pepper) Rust
Teresa.Rust@...


--
Teresa (Hamilton/Pepper) Rust
Descendant of John Hamilton and John Magoon
My husband and children are descendants of Duncan Stewart


Re: Introduction - Call Upon the Water

Jane Kelton
 

Thanks for the recommendation, Diane. Will look for it online now; it sounds interesting for learning more about the period and our ancestors' cohort. 

Jane Kelton

On Wednesday, October 14, 2020, 01:50:21 PM EDT, Diane Schroeder <dianerae45@...> wrote:


Welcome. I've been intending to share this for a while so you're question was timely.  I recently finished Call Upon the Water by Stella Tillyard.  Set in England and America in the seventeenth century, I was pleasantly surprised to find that a group of Scottish prisoners of war playing a role in the draining of the British wetlands that is central to the story.  While none of the prisoners play a central role in the narrative, it was really interesting to see how our relatives in other other historic events.  A main character who is not a Scottish prisoner is sent to the colonies as an indentured servant along with other prisoners. It is an interesting story and very well written.  If you enjoy good fiction I recommend it.  Regards 


Re: Introduction - Call Upon the Water

Diane Schroeder
 

Welcome. I've been intending to share this for a while so you're question was timely.  I recently finished Call Upon the Water by Stella Tillyard.  Set in England and America in the seventeenth century, I was pleasantly surprised to find that a group of Scottish prisoners of war playing a role in the draining of the British wetlands that is central to the story.  While none of the prisoners play a central role in the narrative, it was really interesting to see how our relatives in other other historic events.  A main character who is not a Scottish prisoner is sent to the colonies as an indentured servant along with other prisoners. It is an interesting story and very well written.  If you enjoy good fiction I recommend it.  Regards 

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