Date   
Re: 5MR Circle thoughts

Greg Gillson
 

Can this be adapted to be used with the old San Diego Bird Atlas squares? And if so, how? It would be nice to have something to compare with and perhaps be useful for future research. 

Greg 

--
Greg Gillson
Escondido, California 
sandiegogreg.blogspot.com

Bald Eagle South of Lake Cuyamaca

Edward Henry
 

Between 8:20 and 8:30 a.m. Sunil Bhavsar and I (and our wives) observed a Bald Eagle not far off of CA 79 south of Lake Cuyamaca. Photo links below.

Ed Henry




Re: 5MR Circle thoughts

Justyn Stahl
 

Roger - interesting thought project. The San Diego CBC circle (7.5 mile radius) is centered near the mouth of the Sweetwater River and encompasses many habitat types (including open ocean, good shorebird/duck habitat, Balboa Park and various other migrant hotspots you mention, and stretching all the way east to the Sweetwater Reservoir). With 216 species in a single day last December, a 5MR circle based on that idea would likely be hard to top, but reducing it by 2.5 miles in either direction may require shifting it a bit to maximize diversity.

Greg - I'm not sure the 5MR circles can be adapted to replicate something as rigorous as the San Diego County Bird Atlas squares. [However, it's possible one could extract general eBird data for a similar purpose - but very few people use appropriate breeding codes***.] Being centered on a person's home, there's little choice in the matter of how 5MR circles are placed on the map. Most circles would overlap. And Atlas squares were 3x3 miles (9 square miles), while a 5MR is 78.5 square miles. They do, however, share at least one common theme: intensive scrutiny of a small area, particularly underbirded locations, in an effort to better document species' occurrence (including, but not limited to, rarities).   I do wish I'd lived here when the Atlas work was done (1997-2002) by Phil Unitt and the 400 volunteers from this community. But hopefully someday soon we'll be able to replicate it to assess the changes that have surely taken place locally.

The San Diego County Bird Atlas is an indispensable piece of literature for local birders. It's available to view online (https://www.sdnhm.org/science/birds-and-mammals/projects/san-diego-county-bird-atlas/) but I would encourage anyone with an interest in San Diego birds to swing by the Natural History Museum and pick up a copy.

*** This does actually bring up a good point: for those of you eBirding, I encourage you to use appropriate breeding codes throughout the breeding season, which is underway for some species already. Anna's Hummingbirds, for example, begin nesting as early as December. For more info on eBird breeding codes, follow this link: https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1006850-breeding-codes-behavior-codes


Cheers,
Justyn Stahl


On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 8:49 PM Greg Gillson <greggillson@...> wrote:
Can this be adapted to be used with the old San Diego Bird Atlas squares? And if so, how? It would be nice to have something to compare with and perhaps be useful for future research. 

Greg 

--
Greg Gillson
Escondido, California 
sandiegogreg.blogspot.com

Re: 5MR Circle thoughts

Roger Uzun
 

For a 5MR circle if you want to keep Sweetwater Reservoir in the mix you lose Hollister st (for the most part), Bird and Butterfly Garden, Sunset ballfields, Dairy Mart Ponds, etc but you still have Nestor and Tesoro.

Is that the idea behind the sweetwater river CBC circle, to include the Reservoir?  If so it might be the best 5 mile radius, but you can't keep Otay and you will lose most of whats south of Nestor / Tesoro.

It seems like somehere in Chula Vista is going to be the best 5 mile spot though.  It's just a matter of how far South and West vs how far North and East you want to go because no single 5MR will give you all you think of in the area.

-Roger


On Sun, Jan 6, 2019 at 7:47 AM Justyn Stahl <justyn.stahl@...> wrote:
Roger - interesting thought project. The San Diego CBC circle (7.5 mile radius) is centered near the mouth of the Sweetwater River and encompasses many habitat types (including open ocean, good shorebird/duck habitat, Balboa Park and various other migrant hotspots you mention, and stretching all the way east to the Sweetwater Reservoir). With 216 species in a single day last December, a 5MR circle based on that idea would likely be hard to top, but reducing it by 2.5 miles in either direction may require shifting it a bit to maximize diversity.

Greg - I'm not sure the 5MR circles can be adapted to replicate something as rigorous as the San Diego County Bird Atlas squares. [However, it's possible one could extract general eBird data for a similar purpose - but very few people use appropriate breeding codes***.] Being centered on a person's home, there's little choice in the matter of how 5MR circles are placed on the map. Most circles would overlap. And Atlas squares were 3x3 miles (9 square miles), while a 5MR is 78.5 square miles. They do, however, share at least one common theme: intensive scrutiny of a small area, particularly underbirded locations, in an effort to better document species' occurrence (including, but not limited to, rarities).   I do wish I'd lived here when the Atlas work was done (1997-2002) by Phil Unitt and the 400 volunteers from this community. But hopefully someday soon we'll be able to replicate it to assess the changes that have surely taken place locally.

The San Diego County Bird Atlas is an indispensable piece of literature for local birders. It's available to view online (https://www.sdnhm.org/science/birds-and-mammals/projects/san-diego-county-bird-atlas/) but I would encourage anyone with an interest in San Diego birds to swing by the Natural History Museum and pick up a copy.

*** This does actually bring up a good point: for those of you eBirding, I encourage you to use appropriate breeding codes throughout the breeding season, which is underway for some species already. Anna's Hummingbirds, for example, begin nesting as early as December. For more info on eBird breeding codes, follow this link: https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1006850-breeding-codes-behavior-codes


Cheers,
Justyn Stahl


On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 8:49 PM Greg Gillson <greggillson@...> wrote:
Can this be adapted to be used with the old San Diego Bird Atlas squares? And if so, how? It would be nice to have something to compare with and perhaps be useful for future research. 

Greg 

--
Greg Gillson
Escondido, California 
sandiegogreg.blogspot.com

Re: TRV 1-5-18

Trent R. Stanley
 

Here's a few in flight and ground pictures of the two Pacific Golden-Plovers at Ream Field, 32.566480, -117.123120.


On Sat, Jan 5, 2019 at 12:46 PM Eric Kallen <eric@...> wrote:
Trent Stanley & I birded several spots in the TRV this morning, 1-5-18.

At the air field we found a flock of about 12 Black-bellied Plovers. There were two distinctively different plovers in the group. We suspect that they are Pacific Golden-plovers.  Not a great photo opportunity, but Trent got some pics that will probably tell the tale.

We visited the Mall in San Ysidro to check out the large doves, where might be lurking the spotted variety that was seen in the area in October.  We were surprised to find two new Vermilion Flys, an adult male and a female-type on the border fence behind the Ross clothing store.  We then drove over to the ballfields to check on that  flycatcher, and Nestor Park.  The two well-known birds were in their usual spots.

Photos included with my ebird report.  

Eric Kallen



--
@sdbirder

Sagebrush Sparrow & White-winged Doves - Ramona

Jay Desgrosellier
 

As part of the Escondido CBC on Saturday January 5th Courtny Achenbach and I observed a SAGEBRUSH SPARROW on mitigation land to the west of the northern terminus of Pine Street in Ramona. This location is unusually far west for this species, which more regularly winters in the desert. It was observed foraging on the ground with 8 Bell's and several White-crowned Sparrows at the weedy edge of an extensive area of sage scrub. The Sagebrush Sparrow was immediately discernible, even from a distance, due to its very pale coloration relative to the coastal Bell's Sparrows. Closer observation allowed us to observe the fine streaking on the back that is characteristic of this species.

This area is accessible by heading north on Pine St. to where it bends to the west and parking on Katherines View Way. On the south side of the road, walk along the marked hiker/horse trail to the west, going through (or around) the first gully. Then head south along the edge of the sage looking for the flock on the ground. 

Additionally a conservative count of 14 WHITE-WINGED DOVE were noted along Black Canyon Road at the north end of the Oak Tree Ranch mobile home park, representing a substantial increase of this desert-dwelling species for the area. Four were noted at this same location on the count last year.

Good Birding!

Jay Desgrosellier
San Diego, CA

Archie Moore Rd Ramona

Roger Uzun
 

I headed up to Archie Moore Rd in Ramona this afternoon around 3PM to see what was there.  There were a few Red-Tailed Hawks in the area, a Ferruginous Hawk, Say's Phoebes, American Crows, a Kestrel, not much else.  Went by the Pomegranite farm area, but only birds I saw were Phoebes and Yellow-Rumped Warblers.

As the sun started to get low I headed  up to Rangeland rd and got out of my car near where the Bald Eagles have a nest, and on the West side of Rangeland Rd opposite of the Nest area was a Juvenile Bald eagle, maybe 25 ft from my car.  I did not see it until it took off and only managed a blurry photo as it flew away.  At the time I thought it was a Golden Eagle but looking at the photo it's not, it's pretty clearly a Juvenile Bald eagle.

Some locals said there has been a Juvenile Bald Eagle hanging around the power poles and flying low in the fields, so there might be a photo op here.

I saw no Mountain Bluebirds, and no blackbirds to speak of, except maybe a few red-winged or brewers far in the distance, I couldn't be sure what they were.

ebird lists here - 

-Roger Uzun
Poway CA

SLR River Reddish Egret

buck fairbanks
 

A Reddish Egret, quite possibly the bird first reported by Ken Weaver a couple of months ago, was present briefly west of the Pacific St bridge at the now open mouth of the San Luis Rey River in Oceanside today at noon. Showing nice reddish plumes on its neck, the bird flew off upriver after a few minutes of foraging along the flowing river.
Michael Martin 
Oceanside, CA

Bald eagle at Lower Otay Lake 1-5-19

Terence Brashear
 

A co-worker just showed me video he took of an Adult Bald Eagle being chased by a Golden Eagle at Lower Otay this past Saturday, January 5, 2019.
 
Terry Brashear
San Diego County, CA
http://www.naturepixels.com
birdnird AT yahoo.com

 

Miscellaneous birds on Monday 01/07/2019 and Tuesday 01/08/2019

Mel Senac
 

I have been able to bird the past two mornings (1/7 and 1/8).

 

On Monday Jan 07,2019 the Red-necked Grebe is still present on Shelter Island. I had the bird working the channel between the boat launch and fishing pier. The horse pastures off San Dieguito Rd has 2 large flocks of Canada Geese with the larger flock having a minimum of 3 Cackling Geese. The smaller, more distant flock has one “white goose” that I presume is the continuing Ross’s Goose but too distant even through a scope to be certain.

 

Today, Jan 8, 2019 I saw the 2 Pacific Golden-Plovers at Tijuana Slough NWR –Ream Field that Eric K and Trent Stanley found on Jan 5. They are among the group of Black-bellied Plovers. The birds are distant , even through a scope and the lighting is poor in the AM. The looks are less than satisfactory for someone who loves to take photos.

I then headed over to the Saltworks—pond 20 looking for the reliable Common Goldeneyes frequently seen this time of year at this site.  15 Common Goldeneyes were present, 14 females and 1 male. The water level is very high. I then headed over to Sweetwater River just below the KOA campground. A male Eurasian Wigeon has returned for the -th winter. Good photo op—park on the street near the KOA and walk down the bike trail about a ¼ of a mile.

 

Good birding,

Mel Senac

San Diego

Mountain Bluebirds Ramona

Roger Uzun
 

I've been looking for Mountain Bluebirds on and around Rangeland Rd the past few days, but wasn't really able to locate any until today.

They weren't real close to Rangeland road, they were along Highland Valley Road, on both sides of the road, nearer to the grasslands entrance and west of there, close to Archie Moore Rd and Archie Moore Trail.  Maybe they have been here for a while, but they were there in pretty good numbers this morning.

-Roger Uzun
Poway CA

SD River from Dog Beach to near the 5 fwy

Thomas Myers
 

Sorry for the late post, yesterday Tuesday I birded said area teaching a friend beginning birding. From 11:00 til dusk there were two Reddish Egrets (juvenile & adult) & the Tricolored Heron working the east end of Dog Beach mudflats and South river channel. There were also two Black Oystercatchers on the concrete slab part of the jetty that separates the river from the Mission Bay inlet. Then later to the further east,  between the two bridges, were a first winter Common Goldeneye and a male Eurasian Wigeon.

Thomas Myers
Oceanside

Escondido CBC Notes

Kenneth Weaver
 

The Escondido CBC was held on January 5.  We recorded 150 species, a little

below the previous ten-year average of 154.  Only four species were noted that

were recorded on fewer than ten previous counts.  


Our sole new species was a Sagebrush Sparrow observed in Ramona by Jay

Desgrosellier and Courtny Achenbach.  Jay has previously commented on this

sighting.  This brings our total number of species recorded in this count circle to

235.  


Other species with fewer than ten previous records include:


Clark’s Grebe, six on Lake Wohlford, actually being regularly reported in recent

years.


Harris’s Hawk near the Ramona Airport, also noted on last year’s CBC and

intermittently since.


White-winged Dove, a total of twenty-five noted by three teams covering

northeast Ramona, the Ramona Airport, and the east end of the San Pasqual

Valley.  This is our third straight year of recording this species which appears to

be expanding its range.


Cedar Waxwings, Western Bluebirds, Hermit Thrushes, and American Robins

occurred in above average numbers, but many songbirds were in notably low

numbers.  Thirty Hooded Mergansers constituted a new high count.

I also note the following species that were recorded on this year’s Escondido 

CBC that were not listed on the 2017 San Diego CBC:  Ross’s Goose, Wood 

Duck, Common Mergasner, Golden Eagle, Bald Eagle (I know of one on this 

year’s SD count), Ferruginous Hawk, Western Screech-Owl, White-throated 

Swift, Red-breasted Sapsucker, Mountain Chickadee, Canyon Wren, Mountain 

Bluebird, Bell’s Sparrow, Vesper Sparrow, Scott’s Oriole, and Purple Finch.


Ken Weaver

Fallbrook

gnatcatcher@...



First egg for Brandt's Cormorants at La Jolla Cove

Sally M. Gall
 

This morning (1/11/19) a friend and I saw an egg for the first time this season at the Cove's Brandt's Cormorant rookery. Two females were hunkered down quietly on their nests, and when one stood up, there was an egg. So there might be one or more under the other female too? Lots of active displaying going on among the other birds. Their throats are really blue, and the white nuptial plumes seem especially handsome this year.

Sally M. Gall
La Jolla
librettist@...

Tesoro Grove /Nestor Park

Anthony Fife
 

The rain broke just before the morning light peaked the horizon. It was brisk, fresh and beautiful out at Nestor/Tesoro this morning. Birds were everywhere as were the puddles of water. There were a large amount of birds (50) drinking from the storm drain on the southwest side of Nestor Park. The stream that flows perpendicular and under Tessor Grove Wy was flowing well and sounded amazing.

The SCISSOR-TAIL FLYCATCHER was present near the play ground before flying off to the north towards Tesoro.

Throughtout the park the warblers were everywhere. I saw a WILSON, at least 4 OCW’s, at least 5 Black-Throated Gray’s if not more, RCK’s in abundance...

I can only imagine what I missed.

Side note, there were also a lot of birds in the water near the Radio Control airport, Northern Shovlers, Herons, Egrets, Gulls, killdeer...but Inwas just driving by. Only issue, it’s nasty and you’ll get stuck if you drive very far in the mud, so use caution.

if you’re headed to TRV today, HOLLISTER IS FLOODED JUST (south) PAST the Bird and Butterfly gardens, and MONUMENT ROAD is flooded just west of holister (Smuglers Gulch) with FASTMOVING WATER!!!

Hapy New Year and Happy birding!!!

Pinyon Jay continues in Chula Vista

Elizabeth Copper
 

Today, Jan 12 around 1600, Mark Billings, Julie Barrios, and I saw the Pinyon Jay in Chula Vista  on the ne part of the path circling Eastlake.  This bird was first found by Mark on 1 Dec. in the same area and he has refound the bird on more than one date since.  The Jay was loosely associating with a flock of red-winged blackbirds and was heard to call briefly once. 

 

Elizabeth Copper

Coronado

next san elijo monthly bird count monday 14 jan

Robert Patton
 

The next San Elijo monthly bird count will be Monday 14 January.  Counts are conducted by volunteers on the second Monday of each month, rain or shine.  Please spread the word or join us if you can (no RSVP required).  Meet at 7:30 am at the north end of Rios Ave in Solana Beach (north from Lomas Santa Fe Dr, west of I-5) to divide into groups to cover different subareas.  A compilation generally follows around noon at the nature center on Manchester Ave (bring your own lunch).

Robert Patton
San Diego, CA

Cabrillo tidepool question

Jessica Pollock <Jessicapollock@...>
 

Hi all,

I'm visiting San Diego this week and will be doing some birding (in the rain apparently!), but also want to visit tide pools. I see the Cabrillo National Monument is closed to everyone, and since I've never been there before, is there still a way to access tide pools in the vicinity, or are they all in the park and truly off limits? What are the Point Loma tide pools - are they in the park? Is there a way to park somewhere and walk along the beach to access?  If these are inaccessible, are there any other awesome tidepools nearby?

Thank you! 
Jessica

results of today's 14 jan 2019 san elijo monthly bird count

Robert Patton
 

Thanks to 12 participants for braving the rain and conducting the 14 January 2019 San Elijo Lagoon monthly bird count: Maryanne Bache (beach), Steve Brad (West Basin, nature center site); Elizabeth Venrick, Emma Havstad (Pole Rd); Steve Perry, Don Johnson (CBS= Rios to freeway); Kathy Aldern, Kevin & Ginnie Brooks (EBS = La Orilla to Sta Inez); Patti Koger, Gjon Hazard (EBE = Stonebridge Mesa); Robert Patton (EBNW = dike; EBNE = Escondido Cr; Cardiff Cove, I-5 fill).

 

112 species were reported.  Species of interest included continuing male Eurasian wigeon south of the intersection of Manchester Ave & Ocean Cove, 2 hooded mergansers off the WSW edge of the eastern mesa, a jaeger sp. offshore, an adult mew gull near the lagoon mouth, 10 barn swallows along the beach and 4 over the east mesa; and uncommon at this site, three ring-necked ducks near the El Camino Real trailhead, a loggerhead shrike to the NW of the overlook NW of Santa Carina, and three rufous-crowned sparrows photographed along the trail east of Rios Ave.

 

Species included:

Pacific loon, red-throated loon, pied-billed grebe, western grebe, black-vented shearwater, brown pelican, double-crested cormorant, Brandt’s cormorant, great blue heron, great egret, snowy egret, green-winged teal, mallard, northern pintail, cinnamon teal, northern shoveler, gadwall, Eurasian wigeon, American wigeon, ring-necked duck, lesser scaup, surf scoter, bufflehead, hooded merganser, red-breasted merganser, ruddy duck, osprey, white-tailed kite, northern harrier, Cooper’s hawk, red-shouldered hawk, red-tailed hawk, American kestrel, merlin, peregrine falcon, California quail, Virginia rail, sora, American coot, black-bellied plover, snowy plover, semipalmated plover, killdeer, black-necked stilt, greater yellowlegs, willet, whimbrel, long-billed curlew, marbled godwit, black turnstone, sanderling, western sandpiper, least sandpiper, dowitcher sp., jaeger sp., Heermann’s gull, mew gull, ring-billed gull, California gull, herring gull, western gull, royal tern, Forster’s tern, rock pigeon, Eurasian collared-dove, mourning dove, Anna’s hummingbird, Allen’s hummingbird, Allen’s/rufous hummingbird sp., belted kingfisher, Nuttall’s woodpecker, downy woodpecker, northern flicker, black phoebe, Say’s phoebe, Cassin’s kingbird, tree swallow, barn swallow, California scrub jay, American crow, common raven, bushtit, Bewick’s wren, house wren, marsh wren, ruby-crowned kinglet, blue-gray gnatcatcher, California gnatcatcher, hermit thrush, wrentit, northern mockingbird, California thrasher, American pipit, cedar waxwing, loggerhead shrike, European starling, orange-crowned warbler, yellow-rumped warbler, common yellowthroat, spotted towhee, California towhee, rufous-crowned sparrow, Belding’s savannah sparrow, migrant savannah sparrow, song sparrow,  Lincoln’s sparrow, golden-crowned sparrow, white-crowned sparrow, red-winged blackbird, western meadowlark, great-tailed grackle, house finch, lesser goldfinch, house sparrow.

The next San Elijo monthly bird count will be Monday 11 February.  Counts are conducted by volunteers on the second Monday of each month, rain or shine.  Please spread the word or join us if you can (no RSVP required).  Meet at 7:30 am at the north end of Rios Ave in Solana Beach (north from Lomas Santa Fe Dr, west of I-5) to divide into groups to cover different subareas.  A compilation generally follows around noon at the nature center on Manchester Ave (bring your own lunch).

R. Patton
San Diego, CA

Continuing rarities

dan jehl
 

Yesterday, January 14th, the Black-and-white Warbler was seen in the Tipu tree north of the restrooms in 28th St. Park. It has been here since October 1. On January 13th I saw the male Vermilion Flycatcher behind the Las Americas mall that was reported by Eric Kallen and Trent Stanley on January 5, right by the metal fence. The bird wasn’t bothered in the slightest by all the vehicle traffic in the parking lot.

Dan Jehl
San Diego