Date   
Re: Oceanside Piet Red-footed Booby

Anthony Fife
 

The Booby is still present...maybe a released pet?!?! All I know is it was letting people pet it...1855 hours 

Re: Oceanside Piet Red-footed Booby

quiksilverws6@...
 

This is my first post so excuse me if I am doing this wrong. The bobby is still present at 506pm. It’s on the railing behind the diner. Everyone with a cell phone stops by with in a foot of it. Someone told me there were people petting it earlier. Just wanted to pass this on.
Thanks
Josh

On Sep 8, 2018, at 3:42 PM, Alex Abela via Groups.Io <thebuzz90=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

The RED-FOOTED BOOBY is still present at 3:40pm sitting on top of the small hut next to the Ruby’s Diner at the end of Oceanside Pier.

Alex Abela
San Diego, CA


Red-footed Booby still on Oside Pier

Trish G
 

Bird continues on hut next to Rubys Diner this morning 7am
Trish Gussler Anaheim

Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery, Sun 9/8/18

Nick Barber
 

Highlights from FRNC this morning were an Ovenbird along the west fenceline at the north edge of the dip and a Magnolia Warbler along the west side of the main road, a little south of the main entrance. 

ebird list:

--
Nick Barber
Tierrasanta, San Diego, CA

The Oceanside red-footed booby

Stan Walens
 

Is being tormented by numerous people (non-birders) and exhibiting signs of acute stress. While it can escape them temporarily by roosting on the roof, this whole situation must be debilitating to the bird.

I would think it likely that at some point soon Project Wildlife or the Humane Society will be asked to come to rescue the bird. In this case, my suggestion is that if you wish to see it, it would behoove you to go to see it sooner rather than later.

Stan Walens, San Diego
September 9, 2018; 12:00 pm

Re: Oceanside Red-footed Booby

Matthew Binns
 

In light of Stan's comments about the condition of the Oceanside Red-footed Booby I think the following information is relevant.


The bird has reportedly been on Oceanside pier for about 2 weeks - I was shown a good photo of it taken on Sept 1st. It is being fed by people fishing and I watched it consume 3 live bait fish in the 40 mins I was present. The lady feeding it has been doing so for days and does stroke the bird's head, which it doesn't react to. I'm not an expert on avian stress, but I didn't see any behavior that indicated the bird was stressed, even though many tourists were taking photos on cell phones from close range. At one stage another woman (who was admonished by the people fishing) pushed the bird off the rail and it flew and landed about 50 yds from the end of the pier. It preened and washed for ~3 minutes, before flying off out to sea, where I lost sight of it. It is therefore well capable of flight and is choosing to return to the pier. I am not sure what actions Project Wildlife or other similar organizations might play to re-habilitate this bird. The bird may be sick, but at this stage is not showing symptoms. If it does in the future, help should be sought.


Matthew Binns

Leucadia

A nice day at Ft. Rosecrans this morning, 9/9.

Mark Stratton
 

As reported by Nick Barber, he had the Ovenbird and Magnolia Warbler this morning.  The Magnolia was seen by more than a half dozen other people but the Ovenbird had stage fright.  After Nick saw it, it again ended up along the west fence line, just North of the dip, but a bit South from where he saw it, and again, flew east towards large pine where it disappeared in the fog.  To my knowledge, the Ovenbird never turned up again.  Besides those birds, there was a Male Rosebreasted Grosbeak just barely north of where the Magnolia was, by the main road, on the west side, and north of the dip.  Another possible female type Rosebreasted, (Though the bill looked flesh colored top and bottom, but was still in the bush and flew before it gave me another look).  The Tropical Kingbird was near the information building by the first west entrance, Another possible female type.  I had a White-winged dove in the North/east loop in a Chinese Elm, and 2 White-breasted Nuthatches on separate ends of the cemetery.  There were two Black-headed Grosbeaks, 1 still almost bright Western Tanager and a bunch of flycatchers.  A visit last night yielded the most flycatchers I have seen in San Diego including the Dusky Flycatcher.

Mark and Camille Stratton
North Park

Chestnut-sided & Tennessee Warblers; Buddy Todd Park, 9SEP 2018

Tito Gonzalez
 

I observed a CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER and a TENNESSEE WARBLER this morning (9 SEP 2018) at Buddy Todd Park in Oceanside. They were foraging in the large ficus/ficus-like trees at the edge of the parking lot and to the left of sidewalk that goes to the basketball court. There are ripe berries in these trees. The CSWA was seen in tree that has branches extending over parking spaces and both birds were seen in the one nearest the sand volleyball court. Photos are included in the following ebird report.

 

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48400181

 

Tito Gonzalez

Carlsbad, CA

Japanese White-eyes at Robb Field 9/9/2018 NOT

terry hurst
 

Hello everyone,

In case anyone is wondering about this exciting bird that I listed for Robb Field today 9/9, don’t get your hopes up. I did not see these birds. I made a typo when trying to enter another bird. Now I wonder what the bird was I tried to enter. Whatever it was  I am sure it wasn’t a rare one.

My apologies for the blunder.

Terry Hurst

Re: Oceanside Red-footed Booby

Philip Unitt
 

Dear friends,

 

My default expectation with boobies is that they have swallowed a fishhook. Several boobies, of various species, received by Project Wildlife have survived for some weeks, then died. When we received them at the San Diego Natural History Museum, dissection revealed the fishhook. I now caution any of our volunteers preparing a booby to watch out for such a fishhook lest it surprise us as we skin down the neck. But the last one we received, the Nazca, didn’t have one.

 

Good birding,

 

Philip Unitt

San Diego

 

From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of Matthew Binns
Sent: Sunday, September 09, 2018 2:34 PM
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Oceanside Red-footed Booby

 

In light of Stan's comments about the condition of the Oceanside Red-footed Booby I think the following information is relevant.

 

The bird has reportedly been on Oceanside pier for about 2 weeks - I was shown a good photo of it taken on Sept 1st. It is being fed by people fishing and I watched it consume 3 live bait fish in the 40 mins I was present. The lady feeding it has been doing so for days and does stroke the bird's head, which it doesn't react to. I'm not an expert on avian stress, but I didn't see any behavior that indicated the bird was stressed, even though many tourists were taking photos on cell phones from close range. At one stage another woman (who was admonished by the people fishing) pushed the bird off the rail and it flew and landed about 50 yds from the end of the pier. It preened and washed for ~3 minutes, before flying off out to sea, where I lost sight of it. It is therefore well capable of flight and is choosing to return to the pier. I am not sure what actions Project Wildlife or other similar organizations might play to re-habilitate this bird. The bird may be sick, but at this stage is not showing symptoms. If it does in the future, help should be sought.

 

Matthew Binns

Leucadia

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com

Oceanside Red-footed Booby has been picked up.....

Mark Stratton
 

I woke up this morning to see a text from Nick and Mary Freeman stating that the Oceanside Red-footed Booby was picked up yesterday afternoon, 9/9, about 4:15, by the Humane Society.  This is all the details that I have.

Mark Stratton
North Park

Upcoming Buena Vista Audubon and Grande Pelagic Sunday Sept. 23rd.

David Povey
 

Hello all,

Just a reminder that the Buena Vista Audubon and Grande Pelagic trip is coming up on Sunday Sept. 23, 2018. A few spaces are available.

This is a 12 hour trip out of H&M Landing in San Diego Bay and will target the Nine Mile Bank and the Thirty Mile Bank west of San Diego.

Recent trips to those areas have produced some interesting birds such as Black-footed and Laysan Albatross, Townsend's Storm-Petrel, a few Least Storm-Petrel , Red-footed, and  Nazca/Masked Boobies, South Polar Skua, Long-tailed Jaeger

and Craveri's Murrelets, among others.

The trip departs at 7 a.m. sharp. Plan on checking in at the landing at least 45 mins. ahead of departure.

The regular price is $145, which goes up by $10 to $155  on Tuesday the 11th.  See trip details and past rip reports at www.sandiegopelagics.com

Reservations can be made by calling 619 222-1144 or on line at www.hmlanding.com .

I hope to see you onboard,

Dave Povey

Dulzura

UTC area – Eastern Kingbird, Sep 10, 2018

Gary Nunn
 

Local birder Aaron Mager was lucky enough to find an EASTERN KINGBIRD in the vicinity of his backyard in the UTC neighborhood.

It has actually been there a few days, Sep 8–10, and Aaron had submitted it to eBird with photographs.  Public access was not known at the time since looks to be a private community but Aaron has kindly offered to let people into his backyard and has alerted neighbors there might be birders coming to look for it.

The address is 5763 Erlanger Street.

Aaron says there is a fire hydrant on the sidewalk and you can walk down between homes in line with the fire hydrant to get to the backyard.  Look for the Eastern Kingbird from there.

Aaron last saw it at 11:19am today Sep 10.

--
Gary Nunn
you can find me on twitter,
@garybnunn

Re: Chestnut-sided & Tennessee Warblers; Buddy Todd Park, 9SEP 2018

Barbara
 

The TENNESSEE WARBLER found yesterday by Tito Gonzalez continues this morning, 10 Sep, in the locations described below by Tito. Also with me to see the bird were Paula Theobald and Jan Nordenberg. 

We did not re-find the Chestnut-sided Warbler.

Barbara Carlson    
San Diego



On Sunday, September 9, 2018, 3:26:27 PM PDT, Tito Gonzalez <txsandpiper@...> wrote:


I observed a CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER and a TENNESSEE WARBLER this morning (9 SEP 2018) at Buddy Todd Park in Oceanside. They were foraging in the large ficus/ficus-like trees at the edge of the parking lot and to the left of sidewalk that goes to the basketball court. There are ripe berries in these trees. The CSWA was seen in tree that has branches extending over parking spaces and both birds were seen in the one nearest the sand volleyball court. Photos are included in the following ebird report.

 

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48400181

 

Tito Gonzalez

Carlsbad, CA

Re: Chestnut-sided & Tennessee Warblers; Buddy Todd Park, 9SEP 2018

Janice Nordenberg
 

After Barbara left Paula and I continued to search for the Chestnut-Sided Warbler and finally got a quick and incomplete view of what we're pretty sure was it. The bird had a white underside and a complete bold white eye ring. It was spotted high in a euc tree immediately next to the ficus/ficus type tree where the Tennessee Warbler was earlier. We first saw it through a window in the ficus and when it disappeared we searched the euc tree and others without finding it. So it's likely still around but difficult to see.

Jan Nordenberg
San Diego

On Mon, Sep 10, 2018 at 1:22 PM Barbara via Groups.Io <barbarac2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The TENNESSEE WARBLER found yesterday by Tito Gonzalez continues this morning, 10 Sep, in the locations described below by Tito. Also with me to see the bird were Paula Theobald and Jan Nordenberg. 

We did not re-find the Chestnut-sided Warbler.

Barbara Carlson    
San Diego



On Sunday, September 9, 2018, 3:26:27 PM PDT, Tito Gonzalez <txsandpiper@...> wrote:


I observed a CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER and a TENNESSEE WARBLER this morning (9 SEP 2018) at Buddy Todd Park in Oceanside. They were foraging in the large ficus/ficus-like trees at the edge of the parking lot and to the left of sidewalk that goes to the basketball court. There are ripe berries in these trees. The CSWA was seen in tree that has branches extending over parking spaces and both birds were seen in the one nearest the sand volleyball court. Photos are included in the following ebird report.

 

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48400181

 

Tito Gonzalez

Carlsbad, CA

Ridgeway’s Rail, Cowles Pt, Lake Murray

nancyeileen1@...
 

Definitely a rail, emerged from marsh vegetation, only 10yards away, while I was picnicking Sunday evening about 6:45pm. No binos or camera. 

Heavy body, compared to grackles that were present.
gray, brown above, cinnamon below, on neck and cheeks, with whitish throat.
Long, heavy, slightly down curved beak.
Tail short, prominent white under, cocked up.
Ventured out along lake shore about 5 yards for about 5 minutes. 

Nancy Stalnaker 
San Carlos

Re: UTC area – Eastern Kingbird, Sep 10, 2018

Larry Edwards
 

Eric Kallen, Nancy Christianson, Mel Senac, and I saw the bird about 1:45 pm, well down in the canyon. We took some (crappy) photos of it, and watched it until it flew off to the east, shortly after 2 pm.

When I got there John Bruin was just leaving, having seen the bird in the tree next door and got some nice photos of it, posted on eBird. Unfortunately, the four of us did not get such great views. It was hanging out with Cassin's and Western Kingbirds.

Thank you, Aaron, for permission to go into your yard. And thanks to your neighbors as well.

Larry Edwards

Re: Ridgeway’s Rail, Cowles Pt, Lake Murray

Gjon Hazard
 

Ridgway's Rails are increasingly being detected at inland (freshwater) localities. I am not aware of any being previously found at Lake Murray, but they've been reported from 'far-inland' sites such as Mission Trails Park, Otay Lakes, and Guajome Park (see eBird). 

It'd be good to document the Lake Murray bird. Indeed, I recommend observers treat all non-coastal Ridgway's Rails as 'rare' and take pains to document them accordingly.

Ridgway's Rails are considered endangered species under State and Federal endangered species acts. This boosts the significance of detections, especially away from known haunts. (It also means that care should be taken to not disturb them; audio playback should be avoided.) 

Thanks for reporting. Good luck. 

-Gjon Hazard 


On Sep 10, 2018, at 3:38 PM, "nancyeileen1@..." <nancyeileen1@...> wrote:

Definitely a rail, emerged from marsh vegetation, only 10yards away, while I was picnicking Sunday evening about 6:45pm. No binos or camera. 

Heavy body, compared to grackles that were present.
gray, brown above, cinnamon below, on neck and cheeks, with whitish throat.
Long, heavy, slightly down curved beak.
Tail short, prominent white under, cocked up.
Ventured out along lake shore about 5 yards for about 5 minutes. 

Nancy Stalnaker 
San Carlos

Re: Ridgeway’s Rail, Cowles Pt, Lake Murray

Michael Evans
 

C. Zinsky reported Virginia Rails from the lake at Mission Trails Park over the weekend & posted photos <https://www.flickr.com/photos/122472313@N07/>

Mike Evans

Mike Evans
San Diego
Mobile Message


On Sep 10, 2018, at 4:37 PM, Gjon Hazard <gjon_hazard@...> wrote:

Ridgway's Rails are increasingly being detected at inland (freshwater) localities. I am not aware of any being previously found at Lake Murray, but they've been reported from 'far-inland' sites such as Mission Trails Park, Otay Lakes, and Guajome Park (see eBird). 

It'd be good to document the Lake Murray bird. Indeed, I recommend observers treat all non-coastal Ridgway's Rails as 'rare' and take pains to document them accordingly.

Ridgway's Rails are considered endangered species under State and Federal endangered species acts. This boosts the significance of detections, especially away from known haunts. (It also means that care should be taken to not disturb them; audio playback should be avoided.) 

Thanks for reporting. Good luck. 

-Gjon Hazard 


On Sep 10, 2018, at 3:38 PM, "nancyeileen1@..." <nancyeileen1@...> wrote:

Definitely a rail, emerged from marsh vegetation, only 10yards away, while I was picnicking Sunday evening about 6:45pm. No binos or camera. 

Heavy body, compared to grackles that were present.
gray, brown above, cinnamon below, on neck and cheeks, with whitish throat.
Long, heavy, slightly down curved beak.
Tail short, prominent white under, cocked up.
Ventured out along lake shore about 5 yards for about 5 minutes. 

Nancy Stalnaker 
San Carlos

results of today's 10 Sept San Elijo monthly bird count

Robert Patton
 

 Thanks to 14 participants for conducting the 10 Sept 2018 San Elijo Lagoon monthly bird count: Steve Brad (beach/offshore, West Basin, nature center site); Steve Perry, Bradley Nussbaum (Pole Rd); Jayne Lesley, Gail DeLalla, Don Johnson, Kathy Knight, Shin Takeda (CBS= Rios to freeway); Maryanne Bache, Patti Koger, Mike Nelson (EBS = La Orilla to Sta Inez); Elizabeth Venrick, Jeff Clingan (EBE = Stonebridge Mesa); Robert Patton (EBNW = dike; EBNE = Escondido Cr; Cardiff Cove, I-5 fill).

 

Most areas were relatively quiet, but landbird migration was well-represented in a few key spots.  Species of interest included red-necked phalaropes & a violet-green swallow both in the west basin & NW of Rios; western wood-peewee, willow flycatcher, a white-breasted nuthatch, somewhat early ruby-crowned kinglet, yellow warbler, yellow-rumped warbler, and black-throated gray warbler along the Rios trail; black-headed grosbeaks along the Rios trail & at the nature center site; warbling vireo & Wilson’s warbler along the nature center site boardwalk; loggerhead shrike along the east basin dike; 2 hooded orioles at Sta Carina trailhead, common poorwill calling off Sta Helena pre-dawn (thanks Jayne!), and a relatively late yellow-breasted chat west of El Camino Real.

107 species were recorded: pied-billed grebe, brown pelican, double-crested cormorant, great blue heron, great egret, snowy egret, black-crowned night-heron, white-faced ibis, mallard, gadwall, teal sp., turkey vulture, osprey, white-tailed kite, northern harrier, Cooper’s hawk, red-shouldered hawk, red-tailed hawk, American kestrel, peregrine falcon, California quail, Ridgway’s rail, sora, American coot, black-bellied plover, snowy plover, semipalmated plover, killdeer, black-necked stilt, American avocet, greater yellowlegs, willet, spotted sandpiper, whimbrel, long-billed curlew, marbled godwit, black turnstone, sanderling, western sandpiper, least sandpiper, dowitcher sp., red-necked phalarope, Heermann’s gull, ring-billed gull, California gull, western gull, Caspian tern, royal tern, rock pigeon, Eurasian collared-dove, mourning dove, great horned owl, common poorwill, Anna’s hummingbird, Allen’s hummingbird, Allen’s/rufous hummingbird sp., belted kingfisher, Nuttall’s woodpecker, downy woodpecker, western wood-peewee, willow flycatcher, Pacific-slope flycatcher, Empidonax sp., black phoebe, Cassin’s kingbird, western kingbird, tree swallow, violet-green swallow, northern rough-winged swallow, cliff swallow, barn swallow, California scrub jay, American crow, common raven, bushtit, white-breasted nuthatch, Bewick’s wren, house wren, marsh wren, ruby-crowned kinglet, blue-gray gnatcatcher, California gnatcatcher, western bluebird, wrentit, northern mockingbird, California thrasher, loggerhead shrike, European starling, warbling vireo, orange-crowned warbler, yellow warbler, yellow-rumped warbler, black-throated gray warbler, common yellowthroat, Wilson’s warbler, yellow-breasted chat, black-headed grosbeak, spotted towhee, California towhee, Belding’s savannah sparrow, song sparrow, red-winged blackbird, western meadowlark, hooded oriole, house finch, lesser goldfinch, house sparrow, scaly-breasted munia.

The next San Elijo monthly bird count will be Monday 8 October.  Counts are conducted by volunteers on the second Monday of each month, rain or shine.  Please spread the word or join us if you can (no RSVP required).  Meet at 7:30 am at the north end of Rios Ave in Solana Beach (north from Lomas Santa Fe Dr, west of I-5) to divide into groups to cover different subareas.  A compilation generally follows around noon at the nature center on Manchester Ave (bring your own lunch).

R. Patton
San Diego, CA