Date   
San Diego Botanic Garden Bird Walk: Orchard Oriole, pair Acorn Woodpeckers, continuing DC Flycatcher, Monday April 3

Susan Smith
 

On Rita Campbells monthly bird walk today, highlights today were a female type Orchard Oriole, two Acorn Woodpeckers (first ones seen here since 2006), and the continuing Dusky-capped Flycatcher.  The Orchard Oriole may have been wintering locally (tho I dont think here in the SDBG) and possibly passing  though here on the move, not sure. Details on list below:    Sue Smith, Del Mar, CA

San Diego Botanic Garden, San Diego, California, US
Apr 3, 2017 7:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Protocol: Area
20.0 ac
Comments: Rita Campbell's monthly bird walk. Mostly cloudy with some sun at the end near the end of the walk. Temps 60-76 deg F; wind 0-5mph from the South. Unusual occurrences: Orchard Oriole, two Acorn Woodpeckers, continuing Dusk-capped Flycatcher.
43 species (+2 other taxa)

Mallard 2
Cooper's Hawk 2
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 2
Mourning Dove 15
Anna's Hummingbird 7
Rufous Hummingbird 1
Allen's Hummingbird 8
Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird 19
hummingbird sp. 2
Acorn Woodpecker 1 Two birds perched close together (a pair?)at the top of a Torrey Pine tree above a cork oak tree at the northwest corner of the Lawn Garden. Two medium-sized black and white woodpeckers with clownish face pattern--with white eyes against dark eye patch and nape, and cream forehead and chin. Picture to follow. The last Acorn Woodpecker seen here in the garden was recorded in June 2006. A small population of these birds once nested here during the years 1987-2005-6, and represent the only instance of this species colonizing an artificial oak habitat (cork oak).
Nuttall's Woodpecker 3
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 2
Black Phoebe 3
Dusky-capped Flycatcher 1 Continuing wintering bird seen at the NW corner of the Lawn Garden just south of the waterfall overlook, near the gazebo, about 10:45 am. Smallish Myiarchus with little if any discernible red in the tail, and distinctive mournful Peee-ur vocalization
Cassin's Kingbird 2
Hutton's Vireo 2
California Scrub-Jay 4
American Crow 11
Common Raven 1
Bushtit 6
House Wren 1
Bewick's Wren 8
Wrentit 1
Northern Mockingbird 2
European Starling 2 flyovers
Cedar Waxwing 9
Orange-crowned Warbler 7
Nashville Warbler 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 50 multiple males singing
Townsend's Warbler 3 males singing
Wilson's Warbler 2
White-crowned Sparrow 22
Golden-crowned Sparrow 1
Song Sparrow 10
California Towhee 6
Spotted Towhee 9
Western Tanager 3
Orchard Oriole 1 Female type Orchard Oriole in blooming coral tree near Seeds of Wonder Garden, with numerous yellow-rumped warblers, feeding on nectar. Like a small Hooded Oriole with a shortish tail (more proportional to a warbler body-tail length ratio), and smaller bill with straight culmen; body and head with a greenish yellow cast, and wings with contrasty wingbars. Tail flicks.
Hooded Oriole 3
House Finch 34
Lesser Goldfinch 4
House Sparrow 5
Scaly-breasted Munia 9

Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological  Consulting
Del Mar, CA 


Tamarisk Grove Long-eared Owl

Charlene Glacy
 

Janis Cadwallader and I saw the Long-eared Owl in the tree behind cabin 17 at 8:45 this morning.

Charlene Glacy
San Diego

Long-tailed duck continues

Nicole Desnoyers
 

The long-tailed duck continued yesterday (4/3) off Tidelands Park, Coronado.

Nicole Desnoyers
San Diego/San Clemente Island

Least Bitterns at Santee Lakes

Jeremiah Stock
 

There were three Least Bitterns at Santee Lakes Tuesday evening (about 6 to 6:30 PM).  Two separate birds were calling from cattails on the west side and the northwest corner of Lake 6.  A third bird was seen out in the open at the edge of the cattail mass at the northwest corner of Lake 7.


Jeremiah Stock

Santee, CA

jscls@...

misc. continuing rarities, & La Jolla

Paul Lehman
 

The past few days, Barbara Carlson has been poking around various parts of the county and has seen the following continuing stakeouts:

5 April: LONG-TAILED DUCK off south end of Tidelands Park (just north of bridge) in Coronado

4 April: LONG-EARED OWL at Tamarisk Campground, INCA DOVE at Roadrunner Club entrance, and 2 LEWIS'S WOODPECKERS at Lake Henshaw

3 April: THICK-BILLED KINGBIRD at Poggi greenbelt (this bird often lingers into late April)

On Weds, we did an early-morning seawatch at La Jolla and had the 3 continuing BLACK OYSTERCATCHERS, 500+ Black-vented Shearwaters very close to shore, and an excellent movement of many hundred northbound Pacific Loons and good numbers of northbound Forster's Terns; be sure to fully AVOID this area this coming Friday-Sunday due to a big event happening w/ no parking

--Paul Lehman, San Diego

birding & guide around Tulum, Mexico

Ed Henry
 

My wife and I are going to Tulum for a wedding and will have two mornings for birding in the area. If you could recommend a guide or have any advise on birding hotspots there, we would be grateful.

Ed Henry

LE Owls at Tamarisk Grove

Nancy Christensen
 

Millie and Peter Thomas and myself were at Tamarisk Grove this afternoon where we ran into Jim Pea. Jim spotted a LE Owl near the fenced propane enclosure. After looking around we saw a nest high up in a tamarisk in the same general area (probably a red-tail hawk nest from the size). We could see (with great difficulty due to interfering vegetation) tail feathers of an incubating bird up there. The ranger says they have not been seeing any raptors on a regular basis, so I speculate this may be a LE Owl. I find it hard to believe a LE Owl would be sitting near this nest if it was occupied by a larger predator. While there and discussing this with the ranger, he said an owl had just been reported in space 19. We all walked over to look and yes indeed, yet another LE Owl. Space 19 is in the center of the campground circle and has just a shade ramada. If you walk through the ramada and look up, the owl is right there in that tree. Quite low to the ground, but awkward branch placement makes it a harder spot to get photos. So definitely 2 LE Owls, and possibly more.

 

Also seen this afternoon was a MacGillivray’s Warbler (FOS) just across the campground road to the north of space 19 (I failed to note a space number there).

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 

next san elijo monthly bird count monday 10 april

Robert Patton
 

Please spread the word –

San Elijo Lagoon monthly bird count

Monday April 10th (& 2nd Monday of each month, rain or shine)

Meet at the north end of Rios Ave in Solana Beach at 7:30 am

(from I-5, exit Lomas Santa Fe Dr & head west, turn north on Rios Ave which is just east of Highway 101 & the railroad tracks)

Bring a lunch or pick up one nearby & we’ll meet to compile at noon at the nature center (SE of intersection of Manchester Ave & San Elijo Ave)

Thanks!

 R. Patton

San Diego, CA

Black-throated sparrow in La Jolla

Marsha Ingersoll
 

The above species was observed foraging  at La Jolla Hermosa Park today.  Photo's taken and submitted to e-bird.

Hank Ingersoll
La Jolla


pacific golden-plover continues tijuana estuary 4-6-17

Robert Patton
 

Just a note that the overwintering Pacific golden-plover was seen again yesterday around 9:20 am perched amid dune vegetation atop a hummock near the channel a couple hundred yards north of the mouth of the Tijuana River - at least at that time it was easily viewable with binoculars from the beach outside the snowy plover nest area fencing.  (Please don't spend too much time in any one place along the fenceline since there are plovers that can be flushed from nests just inside the fence).

R. Patton

San Diego, CA

Lesser Nighthawks

phil Pryde
 

A minimum of at least 3 Lesser Nighthawks were observed this (Fri.) evening around 7:30 p.m. flying over the urbanized area of Tecate, CA.  This is consistent with historic spring arrival dates in the Bird Atlas (p. 297).  I mention it because the Atlas does not show any records during the count period from the Tecate area (square V19 and surrounding). 
Phil Pryde 
San Diego

Phil Pryde

Gray Vireos at Kitchen Creek

Andrew Partin <atpartin@...>
 

For anyone interested in Gray Vireos, I saw 3 on the Pacific Crest Trail east of Kitchen Creek road yesterday, April 7th.  All were within a half mile of the road. I also had a pair of Scott's Orioles.  Checklist with photos below. 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35776857

Andrew T. Partin
Wildlife Specialist, USDA APHIS
San Diego County, CA

Re: LE Owls at Tamarisk Grove

Robert Theriault
 

The stick nest at the propane tank (Tamarisk Grove) has been used by ravens for the past few years, and all of the previous LEOW nests there that I know of have been positioned on the tamarisk needles at the crotches of branches. Still, the literature states that LEOW will use nests made by other birds, so it would be cool if it is an owl nest this year. We will soon know. 


On Thursday, April 6, 2017 4:19 PM, "'Nancy Christensen' nancy.r.christensen@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding]" wrote:


 
Millie and Peter Thomas and myself were at Tamarisk Grove this afternoon where we ran into Jim Pea. Jim spotted a LE Owl near the fenced propane enclosure. After looking around we saw a nest high up in a tamarisk in the same general area (probably a red-tail hawk nest from the size). We could see (with great difficulty due to interfering vegetation) tail feathers of an incubating bird up there. The ranger says they have not been seeing any raptors on a regular basis, so I speculate this may be a LE Owl. I find it hard to believe a LE Owl would be sitting near this nest if it was occupied by a larger predator. While there and discussing this with the ranger, he said an owl had just been reported in space 19. We all walked over to look and yes indeed, yet another LE Owl. Space 19 is in the center of the campground circle and has just a shade ramada. If you walk through the ramada and look up, the owl is right there in that tree. Quite low to the ground, but awkward branch placement makes it a harder spot to get photos. So definitely 2 LE Owls, and possibly more.
 
Also seen this afternoon was a MacGillivray’s Warbler (FOS) just across the campground road to the north of space 19 (I failed to note a space number there).
 
Nancy Christensen
Ramona
 


Re: LE Owls at Tamarisk Grove

Robert Theriault
 

Forgot to sign off...
Bob Theriault, Borrego Springs


On Saturday, April 8, 2017 12:05 PM, "Robert Theriault rtheriault13@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding]" wrote:


 
The stick nest at the propane tank (Tamarisk Grove) has been used by ravens for the past few years, and all of the previous LEOW nests there that I know of have been positioned on the tamarisk needles at the crotches of branches. Still, the literature states that LEOW will use nests made by other birds, so it would be cool if it is an owl nest this year. We will soon know. 


On Thursday, April 6, 2017 4:19 PM, "'Nancy Christensen' nancy.r.christensen@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding]" wrote:


 
Millie and Peter Thomas and myself were at Tamarisk Grove this afternoon where we ran into Jim Pea. Jim spotted a LE Owl near the fenced propane enclosure. After looking around we saw a nest high up in a tamarisk in the same general area (probably a red-tail hawk nest from the size). We could see (with great difficulty due to interfering vegetation) tail feathers of an incubating bird up there. The ranger says they have not been seeing any raptors on a regular basis, so I speculate this may be a LE Owl. I find it hard to believe a LE Owl would be sitting near this nest if it was occupied by a larger predator. While there and discussing this with the ranger, he said an owl had just been reported in space 19. We all walked over to look and yes indeed, yet another LE Owl. Space 19 is in the center of the campground circle and has just a shade ramada. If you walk through the ramada and look up, the owl is right there in that tree. Quite low to the ground, but awkward branch placement makes it a harder spot to get photos. So definitely 2 LE Owls, and possibly more.
 
Also seen this afternoon was a MacGillivray’s Warbler (FOS) just across the campground road to the north of space 19 (I failed to note a space number there).
 
Nancy Christensen
Ramona
 




Kitchen Creek-not

Catherine Zinsky
 

Started birding Kitchen Creek yesterday (Saturday), only to be turned back by high winds and heavy drizzle.  NOT a good day for birding  there--and I so wanted to see the Gray Vireo.  It was not to be.  Did manage to see some California Quail and one Black-chinned Sparrow before turning around.  Will try again next week.


--
Waggin' tails,

Catherine


Author of "Attitude + Attention =Teamwork!
                           Seven Steps to Success"
Available thru www.gettoready.net

Competitive Obedience Toolbox: www.gettoready.net

Ch Borderfame Soul Train UDX, OM ('Kellan the Felon' a.k.a. 'Sir Barkalot')
OTCH Sporting Fields Summer Solstice, UDX 9, OGM ("Dax", as in "Dax of the Long Tongue" aka 'Sir Lickalot'))
Ch. OTCH Sporting Field's Quantum Leap UDX2, OM3  ('Devon' as in 'Devon the Usurper'  aka "Monkey")   
Ch. OTCH Trumagik Step Aside, UDX 20, OGM   (2002 - 2015)
Shorewind Spellbound's Dragon Rider  ("Echo")
 
 

Mission Trails Regional Park-Sunday

Catherine Zinsky
 

Had an hour to bird this morning, so made a quick trip to Mission Trails.  It was full of walkers, hikers, campers, and backpackers.  It was also very birdy.  Highlights included:
Grasshopper Sparrows (Grasslands)
White-tailed Kite
Black-chinned Hummingbird
Rufous-crowned Sparrow
Greater Road Runner 
one very uncooperative but vocal Chat
Black-headed Grosbeak
Lark Sparrows
Lincoln's Sparrow
Ash-throated Flycatcher 

Certainly more satisfying than yesterday!  Photos at:

--
Waggin' tails,

Catherine


Author of "Attitude + Attention =Teamwork!
                           Seven Steps to Success"
Available thru www.gettoready.net

Competitive Obedience Toolbox: www.gettoready.net

Ch Borderfame Soul Train UDX, OM ('Kellan the Felon' a.k.a. 'Sir Barkalot')
OTCH Sporting Fields Summer Solstice, UDX 9, OGM ("Dax", as in "Dax of the Long Tongue" aka 'Sir Lickalot'))
Ch. OTCH Sporting Field's Quantum Leap UDX2, OM3  ('Devon' as in 'Devon the Usurper'  aka "Monkey")   
Ch. OTCH Trumagik Step Aside, UDX 20, OGM   (2002 - 2015)
Shorewind Spellbound's Dragon Rider  ("Echo")
 
 

Warblers, Kitchen Creek Road and Pine Valley

Jeremiah Stock
 

Inspired by Andrew Partin's report, I went looking for Gray Vireos and other birds at Kitchen Creek mid-morning Sunday.  I was able to see two Gray Vireos along the Pacific Crest Trail east of Kitchen Creek Road.  I also spent a little time on the trail west of the road and saw an adult male Hermit Warbler about 100 yards from the parking area.  At Pine Valley Park there was an adult male Audubon's Warbler and an adult male Myrtle Warbler in the same pine tree, offering a nice comparison.  The exact location was between the new baseball field and the back of the Highway Patrol building just outside of the park.


Jeremiah Stock

Santee, CA

jscls@...

Chestnut-sided Warbler: Carlsbad Continues 9APR2017

Tito Gonzalez
 

The wintering CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER in Carlsbad continued today 9APR2017. It has molted into alternate plumage and appears to be a male. The head looks completely different from a month ago. It was observed in the trees near northern corner of building on west side of street. Photo and stakeout location in eBird report:

 

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35837830

 

Tito Gonzalez

Carlsbad, CA

 

               

Help needed, odd duck at Santee Lakes

phil Pryde
 

        Good Santee Lakes news:  I found the previously reported Least Bittern at Lake 7 with no problem (go out onto the floating motel rooms dock to scan the reeds for it).  

        Weird Santee Lakes news:  In Lake 2 (that has the Mast Blvd bridge over it), on the W side just N of the bridge was an immature duck that defied ID-ing.  I’m pretty sure it was a merganser going from juv. to adult plumage (making the assumption that all adults would be in alternate plumage by now).  Most things on it looked like some manner of COME, but one major one (flank color) was clearly different from anything shown in Sibley or Nat. Geog. (herein “NG”), and more resembled the brownish flank color of an adult male Hooded Merganser.    
       Things that looked like a COME:  The entire throat and breast were bright white, there were black “speckles” in the chin area, as shown in NG (but not Sibley), and the bill was bright yellow and clearly thick at the base (as NG points out in its “1st spring” depiction of a COME).  Also, the head lacked the elongated horizontal rear head feathers characteristic of both HOME and RBME.  Its legs were bright reddish-orange.  It had linear downward black feather patterns coming in from the rear neck area which were longer than the short extension on a COME but did not go all the way to the water line as per a HOME. The head lacked the oval shape of both the HOME and RBME.  Perhaps most importantly, it was large, looking at least 50% longer than the coots swimming by;  i.e., much larger than a HOME.   
       Things that looked like no depiction in either Sibley or NG:  The top of the head and nape area appeared black (not dark green), and had some white dots and the white portion had black dots.  This could perhaps just be that the plumage change was only half-way complete. 
       Things that looked like a HOME:  As noted, the flanks were brownish, somewhat similar to both books' depiction of an adult male HOME, except that the lower belly area (the area where a wigeon would be black) was white.  
       Things that didn’t look like a RBME:  the black line(s?) going downward from the neck, the pure white upper breast and front half of neck area, and the lack of linear feathers extending out and back from the head. 

       Overall, given the bird's large size, bright yellow bill with wide base, head shape, and a few other details, it seemed to most closely resemble a COME.  (Unless someone wants to make a case for a hybrid.) 
       Perhaps the main question would be:  Despite the lack of any such depiction in either Sibley or NG, could a juvenile COME ever have brownish flanks?  

       I’d appreciate any help anyone could extend as to getting a positive ID for this annoying teenager.  If anyone lives near east county, you might be intrigued by a first-hand look at this mystery bird in Pond #2 at Santee lakes. 

Phil Pryde 
San Diego 

   
    
    





results of 10 April san elijo monthly bird count

Robert Patton
 

Thanks to 18 participants for conducting the 10 Apr 2017 San Elijo Lagoon monthly bird count: Steve Brad (seawatch; Nature Center); Lea Squires (beach); Edie Berendsen, Barry Lindgren, Bradley Nussbaum, Elizabeth Venrick (Pole Rd); Kathy Aldern, Gail DeLalla, Jeff Clingan, Steve Perry, Heather Rubiles, Frimmel Smith (CBS= Rios to freeway); Jayne Lesley, Erica Mills, Bill Mittendorff (EBS = La Orilla to Sta Inez); Robert Patton (Beach, West Basin; EBNW = dike; EBNE = Escondido Cr; Cardiff Cove); Don Johnson, Denise Riddle (EBE = Stonebridge Mesa).  (I apologize if I missed anyone or for any misspellings).

 

Notable species included American bittern in flight NE of Sta Carina, common poorwill calling pre-dawn off Sta Carina, black-throated gray warbler & golden-crowned sparrow along the Rios trail.

 

113 species were recorded: Pacific loon, common loon, loon sp., eared grebe, western grebe, black-vented shearwater, brown pelican, double-crested cormorant, Brandt’s cormorant, American bittern, great blue heron, great egret, snowy egret, black-crowned night-heron, white-faced ibis, green-winged teal, mallard, blue-winged teal, cinnamon teal, northern shoveler, gadwall, American wigeon, red-breasted merganser, ruddy duck, osprey, white-tailed kite, northern harrier, Cooper’s hawk, red-shouldered hawk, red-tailed hawk, American kestrel, peregrine falcon, California quail, Ridgway’s rail, Virginia rail, sora, American coot, snowy plover, semipalmated plover, killdeer, black-necked stilt, American avocet, greater yellowlegs, spotted sandpiper, willet, whimbrel, long-billed curlew, ruddy turnstone, black turnstone, sanderling, western sandpiper, least sandpiper, red-necked phalarope, ring-billed gull, California gull, western gull, royal tern, Forster’s tern, tern sp., rock pigeon, Eurasian collared-dove, mourning dove, common poorwill, white-throated swift, Anna’s hummingbird, Allen’s hummingbird, Allen’s/rufous hummingbird sp., belted kingfisher, Nuttall’s woodpecker, downy woodpecker, Pacific-slope flycatcher, black phoebe, Say’s phoebe, ash-throated flycatcher, Cassin’s kingbird, horned lark, barn swallow, rough-winged swallow, California scrub jay, American crow, common raven, bushtit, Bewick’s wren, house wren, marsh wren, blue-gray gnatcatcher, California gnatcatcher, western bluebird, hermit thrush, wrentit, northern mockingbird, California thrasher, American pipit, European starling, Bell’s vireo, Hutton’s vireo, warbling vireo, orange-crowned warbler, yellow warbler, yellow-rumped warbler, black-throated gray warbler, common yellowthroat, black-headed grosbeak, spotted towhee, California towhee, Belding’s savannah sparrow, song sparrow, golden-crowned sparrow, white-crowned sparrow, red-winged blackbird, brown-headed cowbird, hooded oriole, house finch, lesser goldfinch, American goldfinch, house sparrow.

 

The next monthly bird count will be 8 May. 

R. Patton

San Diego, CA