Date   

FRNC today - 9/27 - Tropical Kingbird, Green-tailed Towhee, and Red-breasted Nuthatches

Lisa Ruby
 

Spent 4.5 hours birding FRNC this morning with Ter Hurst and others on and off. Seemed somewhat quiet, but patience and perseverance got us plenty of birds. Dealt with some light rain for a while.

Around noon or so we had a Tropical Kingbird in the northeast corner. It sat on headstones on the east side in front of the wall between sections 200 and 260 and also flew to the west side of the road a few times landing in both a large Chinese Elm (closer to Cabrillo Memorial Drive, not the trees by the inside road), and  a pine on the west side of the inside road. Eventually disappeared over the wall and into the open space. I may have seen it dive over the wall when we first got to that area. At least two other birders saw it.

Just after 11:00 we had a Green-tailed Towhee sitting on the barbed wire outside the low concrete wall on the east side, south of the caretaker's residence. It was about halfway down the steep hill. It bolted as we got closer and flew down the hill, away from the cemetery.

There were two Red-breasted Nuthatches on the west side. I hope I'm remembering this correctly, I think they were partway up the hill going north out of the dip. Vocal for a short time.

Also had what I believe was a Swainson's Thrush just outside the chain link fence on the east portion of the southeast section. Have a poor photo.

List with some photos:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60156777

Lisa Ruby
Sabre Springs




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Lisa Ruby
Sabre Springs


Re: Grace's Warbler - Villa La Jolla Park

Jeffrey Miner
 

At around 9:40 AM, I found Alex’s GRWA high up in a eucalyptus tree near the top
of the hill on the north side of the park, it flew further north over the
houses and I was unable to find it again.

Jeff Miner
San Diego, CA


On Fri, Sep 27, 2019 at 8:58 AM Alex Abela via Groups.Io <thebuzz90=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
A little after 8 this morning (9/27) I had a GRACE'S WARBLER at Villa La Jolla Park.  I first got on the bird near the top of a Torrey Pine along the north edge of the park, before it moved into the neighboring eucalyptus trees.  It eventually flew off into the south side of the park.  It called occasionally, but stayed very high up.  There was a Grace's Warbler seen in the park sporadically last winter, so I assume this is likely a returning bird.

Alex Abela
San Diego, CA


Grace's Warbler - Villa La Jolla Park

Alex Abela
 

A little after 8 this morning (9/27) I had a GRACE'S WARBLER at Villa La Jolla Park.  I first got on the bird near the top of a Torrey Pine along the north edge of the park, before it moved into the neighboring eucalyptus trees.  It eventually flew off into the south side of the park.  It called occasionally, but stayed very high up.  There was a Grace's Warbler seen in the park sporadically last winter, so I assume this is likely a returning bird.

Alex Abela
San Diego, CA


Belted Kingfisher male flying past Cabrillo Tide Pools

Craig Chaddock
 

I photographed a male Belted Kingfisher flying south along the Cabrillo National Monument coast near the main tide pools parking area.


It doesn't get reported often in Point Loma. Was it likely just taking an odd route south, or was this just a rarely noticed transition from the river channel area to the South Bay? It was pretty quick, so if I hadn't photographed it I would have not been confident of the sighting.


++ Craig Chaddock / San Diego, CA


Clay-colored Sparrow Coronado

Elizabeth Copper
 

This morning along with my first white-crowned sparrows in our yard was an adult clay-colored sparrow. They have all left the yard but hoping the ccsparrow will hang around.
Elizabeth Copper
Coronado


Re: eBird review process, an exercise in patience

Nancy Christensen
 

Well said, and many thanks to those of you who volunteer your time and efforts for Ebird. All of us should strive to make the reviewers job as easy as possible.

Once again, thank-you

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb

On Sep 26, 2019, at 8:10 AM, Justyn Stahl <justyn.stahl@...> wrote:

Hello,

For those of you who are frustrated enough to make comments in your observations about "why hasn't this been confirmed?" or who email an eBird reviewer asking the same question, please be patient. eBird reviewers, like you observers, are all volunteers, but unlike many observers we have full time jobs and young children. We also have a desire to go see birds in the flesh, not just live vicariously through your photos and descriptions. Further, due to frequent reports of rarities - not only multiple birds, but a dozen or more reports of the same individual by many observers - the list of records to review grows larger every day, especially in fall (currently 1558 records await review). That review list is sorted chronologically, with the most recent observations first, and with 25 records visible per page. If 50 reports come in on 25 September, your report from 21 September is going to be buried for a while. If you'd like to speed up the review process you can:

1) Write concise but definitive descriptions of birds when flagged, either due to rarity, or due to a high count. How did you reach that count? (Estimate, 1x1 count, estimated by 10s?) How did you identify the bird? What did it look like, what was it doing, what did it sound like, how were similar species eliminates? *Please* do not just write "in a tree" or "identified by leader" or "continuing NOT RARE" or write a paragraph describing ever circumstance *except* what the bird looked like. Most birds can be described in a single sentence or two. Please read over your descriptions before submitting, correct typos, etc. For more information on this, read: https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/973980-reporting-rarities--elements-of-a-bird-description

2) When prompted for more details by a reviewer, add the requested details to the eBird checklist itself, and let the reviewer know you've done so. Providing the details in the email to the reviewer without editing the checklist leaves the record incomplete, and another reviewer is unable to assess the record in the future. By letting a reviewer know that you've added more details or a photo, you are providing them with the link to the checklist and streamlining their ability to confirm the record.

3) Provide photos if available. Photos aren't always necessary, but certainly help confirm the ID. If you mention that you have a photo, the record may not be confirmed until that photo is uploaded. Otherwise, there's a chance we confirm a record in error when the photo is either misidentified or simply dropped in the wrong species (this happens frequently).

4) Submit your checklists in a timely manner. Don't rush your descriptions, but if you wait a week or more to submit your list, it's going to fall deep into the queue and may take time to be confirmed.

5) Finally, don't worry! No slight is intended if your record is not confirmed immediately. I hope observers aren't perceiving it that way. I certainly don't lose sleep or self-esteem when my reports go out on the RBA without "confirmed" stamped on them. If the record is good, it will eventually be confirmed. If it's not obvious, we'll ask for more details.

Unfortunately, this email only reaches those local eBird users subscribed to this listserv, but doesn't get to visiting birders, or those who use eBird but are not subscribed here.

Thanks and happy fall birding,
Justyn Stahl and local eBird review team
San Clemente Island


eBird review process, an exercise in patience

Justyn Stahl
 

Hello,

For those of you who are frustrated enough to make comments in your observations about "why hasn't this been confirmed?" or who email an eBird reviewer asking the same question, please be patient. eBird reviewers, like you observers, are all volunteers, but unlike many observers we have full time jobs and young children. We also have a desire to go see birds in the flesh, not just live vicariously through your photos and descriptions. Further, due to frequent reports of rarities - not only multiple birds, but a dozen or more reports of the same individual by many observers - the list of records to review grows larger every day, especially in fall (currently 1558 records await review). That review list is sorted chronologically, with the most recent observations first, and with 25 records visible per page. If 50 reports come in on 25 September, your report from 21 September is going to be buried for a while. If you'd like to speed up the review process you can:

1) Write concise but definitive descriptions of birds when flagged, either due to rarity, or due to a high count. How did you reach that count? (Estimate, 1x1 count, estimated by 10s?) How did you identify the bird? What did it look like, what was it doing, what did it sound like, how were similar species eliminates? *Please* do not just write "in a tree" or "identified by leader" or "continuing NOT RARE" or write a paragraph describing ever circumstance *except* what the bird looked like. Most birds can be described in a single sentence or two. Please read over your descriptions before submitting, correct typos, etc. For more information on this, read: https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/973980-reporting-rarities--elements-of-a-bird-description

2) When prompted for more details by a reviewer, add the requested details to the eBird checklist itself, and let the reviewer know you've done so. Providing the details in the email to the reviewer without editing the checklist leaves the record incomplete, and another reviewer is unable to assess the record in the future. By letting a reviewer know that you've added more details or a photo, you are providing them with the link to the checklist and streamlining their ability to confirm the record.

3) Provide photos if available. Photos aren't always necessary, but certainly help confirm the ID. If you mention that you have a photo, the record may not be confirmed until that photo is uploaded. Otherwise, there's a chance we confirm a record in error when the photo is either misidentified or simply dropped in the wrong species (this happens frequently).

4) Submit your checklists in a timely manner. Don't rush your descriptions, but if you wait a week or more to submit your list, it's going to fall deep into the queue and may take time to be confirmed.

5) Finally, don't worry! No slight is intended if your record is not confirmed immediately. I hope observers aren't perceiving it that way. I certainly don't lose sleep or self-esteem when my reports go out on the RBA without "confirmed" stamped on them. If the record is good, it will eventually be confirmed. If it's not obvious, we'll ask for more details.

Unfortunately, this email only reaches those local eBird users subscribed to this listserv, but doesn't get to visiting birders, or those who use eBird but are not subscribed here.

Thanks and happy fall birding,
Justyn Stahl and local eBird review team
San Clemente Island


Re: Yellow-green Vireo

Andrew N
 
Edited

We found the Vireo in the same Ficus at Nathan's coordinates at 5pm, it moved very quickly around the dark underside of the tree so good views were few and far between.  No sign of the Blackpoll Warbler in the pines it's been routinely found in.

Andrew Newmark
Hillcrest, San Diego


Re: Yellow-green Vireo

Nathan French
 

After 2+ hrs of looking I was finally able to relocate the Yellow-green Vireo in the ficus on the north side of the entrance to the SE corner (32.6830796, -117.2440063) just after 1PM.

Nathan French
Hillcrest

On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:59 AM, Barbara via Groups.Io <barbarac2003=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Yes, thanks to John Allendorf!

Barbara Carlson
San Diego
On Sep 23, 2019, at 9:33 AM, Nancy Christensen <nancy.r.christensen@gmail.com> wrote:

A fellow from Texas showed me photos of an apparent Yellow-Green Vireo taken this morning at Fort Rosecrans Nat’l crmetry. Southeast section in the Chinese Elm on the NE corner of the loop road. Looking now, but do far only a clay-colored sparrow in the tree.

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb




Re: Yellow-green Vireo

Barbara
 

Yes, thanks to John Allendorf!

Barbara Carlson
San Diego

On Sep 23, 2019, at 9:33 AM, Nancy Christensen <nancy.r.christensen@gmail.com> wrote:

A fellow from Texas showed me photos of an apparent Yellow-Green Vireo taken this morning at Fort Rosecrans Nat’l crmetry. Southeast section in the Chinese Elm on the NE corner of the loop road. Looking now, but do far only a clay-colored sparrow in the tree.

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb


Black-throated Green a Hermit

Alison Hiers
 

Sorry folks, I think it was a Hermit not a Black-throated Green.

Alison Hiers


Black-throated Green Warbler

Alison Hiers
 

We believe we found the Black-throated Green Warbler yesterday around 1:30 previously reported at Agua Dulce by Manolo Turner. It was in some pines about 100 feet or so before the pump house on the left as you are headed to the creek. We saw it again in some oaks close to the pump house. I posted pictures on eBird - https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60054852. Got an interesting photo as it dropped through the air right before it tucked and dove.

Alison Hiers


Blackpoll Warbler at Villa La Jolla Park

Bridget Spencer
 

Hi all, 

I had a Blackpoll Warbler in the northwest section of Villa La Jolla Park this morning, shortly before 9am. It was slowly making its way east in the trees on the south side of the curved path. Photos can be found on my eBird checklist. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60052844

Bridget Spencer
Currently La Jolla 


Re: Yellow-green Vireo

Nancy Christensen
 

Bird refound in trees on NE corner of loop road in SE section of cemetery.

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb

On Sep 23, 2019, at 9:33 AM, Nancy Christensen via Groups.Io <nancy.r.christensen=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

A fellow from Texas showed me photos of an apparent Yellow-Green Vireo taken this morning at Fort Rosecrans Nat’l crmetry. Southeast section in the Chinese Elm on the NE corner of the loop road. Looking now, but do far only a clay-colored sparrow in the tree.

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb


Yellow-green Vireo

Nancy Christensen
 

A fellow from Texas showed me photos of an apparent Yellow-Green Vireo taken this morning at Fort Rosecrans Nat’l crmetry. Southeast section in the Chinese Elm on the NE corner of the loop road. Looking now, but do far only a clay-colored sparrow in the tree.

Nancy Christensen
Ramona


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.
Chinese Proverb


Lake Kumeyaay

Vic Warren
 

Laurel and I did the loop around Lake Kumeyaay Sunday morning. Of greatest interest were 4 Red-necked Phalaropes on the lake and a White-breasted Nuthatch east of the lake.

The entire list includes
Red-necked Phalarope 4
White-breasted Nuthatch
Common Gallinule at least 4
American Coot 20
Gadwall 4
Mallard2
Snowy Egret
Piedbilled Grebe 6
Orange-crowned Warbler
Spotted Towhee
House Finch 4
Anna's Hummingbird at least 15
Red-shouldered Hawk 2
Common Raven
Mourning Dove 6
Red-shouldered Hawk 2 Saw 1, Heard 1
American Crow
Western Scrub Jay 2
Savannah Sparrow 2
House Wren 3
Bewick's Wren 2

Good birding,
Vic Warren and Laurel Scott
Mission Valley


Buena Vista Audubon pelagic Sept. 22, 2019

David Povey
 

The Sunday BVAS Pelagic turned up some nice birds. The biggest hit a Red-billed Tropicbird about 13-14 n.m. west of Bird Rock in La Jolla. This bird took us a little while to everyone on it. We finally caught up with the bird on the water, for nice views and lots of photos.
Two Craveri's Murrelets were found over the San Diego Trough near the north end of the Thirty Mile Bank. We had unknowingly split a pair so each was reluctant to leave. We got some decent looks and could heard the pair doing their trill contact call. Yes, they did eventually join up and flew off together.
The San Diego Trough also turned up an Arctic Tern sitting on the water with four Sabine's Gulls. We may have had that bird or a second Arctic Tern with a Common Tern flock nearby.  Photos will be checked.
Good numbers of Sabine's Gulls today with perhaps a dozen seen.
A bit out of season Rhinoceros Auklet was also on the far side of the S.D. Trough. This a young bird and is now the third I've seen this season. Usually I would expect that species here arrival in late fall or winter. 
The jaeger show continues, with more than thirty seen today. All three species Pomarine, Parasitic and Long-tailed Jaegars present. Twice during the day I could count three separate attacks of jaegers on terns at one time, and one hapless Elegant Tern had four jaegers chasing it all at once !
I'm not sure how we will sort out the species ratio for jaegers but my feeling is that Parastic Jaegers were in the majority today. Pomarine Jaeger would be next. I think we had two or three Long-tailed Jaegers
The closest Long-tailed Jaeger to shore was a youngster over the boat's wake at the top of the Nine Mile Bank, 10-11 n.m. from Point Loma.
Many terns mostly Elegant Terns, but also perhaps a hundred plus Common Terns. Many feeding on large areas of small bait fish, when not trying to avoid said jaegers.
Pink-footed (low numbers), Sooty ( only one? ), and Black-vented Shearwaters (abundant) were all seen.
I'd have to say the big disappointment was the near total lack of storm-petrels. We had very small numbers of Black Storm-Petrel. and perhaps two non Blacks. one an Ashy Storm-Petrel, one likely a chapmani Leach's Storm-Petrel. 
We had five or six Brown Booby for the day, all immatures, and seen as singles
The Nine Mile Bank had a cooperative Humpbacked Whale, and we also saw several  pods of Common Dolphin.
I think we had three sharks on the day. One Hammerhead, a Mako, and one not Id.
We had a fun look at a school of Yellowfin Tuna chewing up an anchovy school, and a couple of Flying Fish were seen.
The next and last local pelagic for 2019 is Oct. 13th. and has spaces, call 619 222-1144
or go to H & M Landing's website  www.hmlanding .com.
I hope you'll join us,
Dave Povey
Dulzura




Blackpoll Warbler continues at FRNC, 09/23

Barbara
 

The Blackpoll Warbler (found by Mark Stratton on Saturday) continues in the same area of Fort Rosecrans. See previous posts for location.

Barbara Carlson
San Diego


Encinitas Dickcissel (9/22/19)

Jimmy McMorran
 

Hi Birders,
Thrilled that not only myself, but my daughter and wife also heard a Dickcissel calling it’s extremely unique flight/call note as it flew somewhat low overhead. We did not ID the bird by its plumage but we all clearly saw the passerine flying over as it called a couple times. I wish it would have stopped at my feeders but it did not.
On a separate note, an American Goldfinch was also heard flying over my place today. Certainly not a rarity. But very rare for my location and only my third record in six or so years at my location.
I’m now currently out of town, but the Del Mar Public Works area may be worth a good scouring. I’ll be doing that in the next few days.
Good Birding,
Jimmy McMorran
Leucadia, CA


--
Good Birding,
Jimmy McMorran,
Leucadia, CA


Re: Hooded Warbler, Quince St and third, NO

peter thomas
 

Also negative for the Hooded Warbler from 7:15 AM - 8:20 AM today at the Quince Street Bridge and 0.1 mile along the trail to the SW.

Peter and Millie Thomas
San Diego

On Sunday, September 22, 2019, 3:29:34 PM PDT, Paul Chad via Groups.Io <paulchad4@...> wrote:


Came up empty today Sun, at the reported Hooded spot, in south 'shadow' of Quince St walking bridge, 12:20 to 2:20, just FYI,

Paul Chad,
University City



1941 - 1960 of 11898