Date   
Ad Red-footed Booby at La Jolla 4/16

James Pawlicki
 

Took off and heading well offshore now 1022.

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: James Pawlicki <jmpawli10@...>
Date: Sun, Apr 16, 2017 at 9:49 AM
Subject: Fwd: Ad Red-footed Booby at La Jolla 4/16
To: sandiegoregionbirding@... <sandiegoregionbirding@...>


It just showed up again 0948. With gull flock just offshore.

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: James Pawlicki <jmpawli10@...>
Date: Sun, Apr 16, 2017 at 9:47 AM
Subject: Ad Red-footed Booby at La Jolla 4/16
To: sandiegoregionbirding@... <sandiegoregionbirding@...>


Dean DiTommaso observed a light adult Red-footed Booby at La Jolla this morning between approximately 7:30 and 8:00. It was last seen heading north and being chased by WEGUs.


Jim Pawlicki
La Mesa, CA

Calliope Hummingbird, Pt Loma, April 16

Sara Baase Mayers
 

A male Calliope perched in our hibiscus bush for a while this
morning, making occasional short flights out and returning to the same
perch.

======================
Sara Baase Mayers
Point Loma (San Diego)
sarabirding@...
======================

Ad Red-footed Booby at La Jolla 4/16

James Pawlicki
 

It just showed up again 0948. With gull flock just offshore.

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: James Pawlicki <jmpawli10@...>
Date: Sun, Apr 16, 2017 at 9:47 AM
Subject: Ad Red-footed Booby at La Jolla 4/16
To: sandiegoregionbirding@... <sandiegoregionbirding@...>


Dean DiTommaso observed a light adult Red-footed Booby at La Jolla this morning between approximately 7:30 and 8:00. It was last seen heading north and being chased by WEGUs.


Jim Pawlicki
La Mesa, CA

Ad Red-footed Booby at La Jolla 4/16

James Pawlicki
 

Dean DiTommaso observed a light adult Red-footed Booby at La Jolla this morning between approximately 7:30 and 8:00. It was last seen heading north and being chased by WEGUs.


Jim Pawlicki
La Mesa, CA

Tricoloreds at Rangeland Road, 4/15/17

Susan Smith
 

On a trip out to the San Ysabel Gallery (Joe Garcia, lots of wonderful bird paintings BTW), I stopped at Rangeland Road in Ramona to watch the nesting Tricolored Blackbirds shuttling back and forth between their nesting area--Ramona  water district's partially hidden pond--and the adjacent cow pastures and beyond. At first I saw nothing, except a few birds in the rushes of the WD pond dipping in and out. But then after waiting a bit, a good-sized flock of 60 or more would take flight and head to their feeding areas to the east. Then more would head east, then more. The tall grass hid most of the feeding birds, but occasionally something would frighten them, and swirls of blackbirds would take to the air.  I estimated the colony size at between 250-300 birds, as Michael Gonzales and Jim McCarthy found on our  recent state-wide Tricolored Blackbird  survey a week ago.  The breeding seems to be in  the nestling stage at the moment  because many females and males were gathering food (grasshopper larvae, grasshoppers, beetles etc).  I noticed that many of the foraging flocks that flew the farthest,   to an area just beyond the Bald Eagle nest (also occupied), were predominately male, whereas most of the flocks feeding by the side of Rangeland Road and nearer the nesting area, were females.  Overall, females predominated, but I think that is expected, because often there is one male to two nesting females. Unlike Redwings, these wonderful birds are colonial nesters like seabirds, and their nests are packed in together. Tricolored Blackbirds, which have  one of the smallest ranges of any species in North America, have declined precipitously. (see also the account in Phil Unitt's Bird Breeding Atlas).   They were given emergency Endangered status under the California Endangered Species Act in December, 2014, and this listing provided temporary (6 month) protection but was allowed to expire in June, 2015. The State status of the species is currently being considered for  permanent protection. This is a good time to check them out at the few breeding sites that remain.  

Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological  Consulting
Del Mar, CA 


Jacumba 4-15-17

Eric Kallen
 

Trent Stanley & I ventured out to zombieland this morning. 


At the swamp and pond we found:

Nashville Warbler 2

Wilson's warblers 10 +

Yellow warblers - 3 seen, more heard

Audubon's warbler 2

Common yellow-throat 4

OC warbler 5

Lazuli bunting 2

Warbling vireo 2

Black-headed Grosbeak

Blackbirds,  mainly tricolored, were streaming into the nesting areas with bugs.  We noticed several newly fledged birds.

All three orioles were seen at the swamp.


Eric Kallen

Normal Heights

Re: Nashville Warbler - Carmel Valley

Martha Wild
 

Nashville Warbler in east Switzer Canyon yesterday, along with a Wilson’s and a Black-throated Gray.
Martha

On Apr 15, 2017, at 1:53 PM, 'Geoffrey Rogers' rogersgl1952@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:


One Nashville at Stonewall Mine today.

 

Geoffrey Rogers

San Diego, CA

 

From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@... [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@...] On Behalf Of David Trissel dtrisse1@...[SanDiegoRegionBirding]
Sent: Saturday, April 15, 2017 9:14 AM
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@...
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Nashville Warbler - Carmel Valley

 

  

A Nashville Warbler came through the backyard this morning. It flew north towards Gonzales Canyon. 

I’m curious if anyone is seeing any warblers besides the usual five (Yellow-rumped, Yellow, Wilson’s, Orange-crowned, Townsend’s) coming through? I saw the March reports of Blackburnian and Painted Redstart, but usually there are a lot more reports of unusual warblers by now. Thoughts?

David Trissel
San Diego, CA



Re: Nashville Warbler - Carmel Valley

Geoffrey L. Rogers
 

One Nashville at Stonewall Mine today.

 

Geoffrey Rogers

San Diego, CA

 

From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@... [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@...] On Behalf Of David Trissel dtrisse1@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding]
Sent: Saturday, April 15, 2017 9:14 AM
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@...
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Nashville Warbler - Carmel Valley

 

 

A Nashville Warbler came through the backyard this morning. It flew north towards Gonzales Canyon.

I’m curious if anyone is seeing any warblers besides the usual five (Yellow-rumped, Yellow, Wilson’s, Orange-crowned, Townsend’s) coming through? I saw the March reports of Blackburnian and Painted Redstart, but usually there are a lot more reports of unusual warblers by now. Thoughts?

David Trissel
San Diego, CA

overland Brant migration

Paul Lehman
 

Just after dawn this morning (Saturday) I watched a flock of 65 Brant at moderate height fly past me, going east to west down the San Dieguito River Valley in Fairbanks Ranch / Del Mar--heading for the coast. It is very likely that this was a migrant flock that flew overnight from the north end of the Gulf of California, via the southern Imperial Valley, the San Diego County mountains, and on westward. There are certainly lots of spring records of such northbound Brant (and scoters) from the Salton Sea, and from the San Diego mountain lakes such as Henshaw and Cuyamaca and even found walking along mountain roads near Julian, etc. (especially when "knocked down" by inclement weather or strong headwinds). Others continue north at the Salton Sea and cut west farther north, such as probably through San Gorgonio Pass. But I don't think there are many records showing what the birds do after they leave/pass Lakes Henshaw, Cuyamaca, etc.--so here's one data point showing one route. For more information, see the San Diego County Bird Atlas.

--Paul Lehman, San Diego

Nashville Warbler - Carmel Valley

David Trissel
 

A Nashville Warbler came through the backyard this morning. It flew north towards Gonzales Canyon.

I’m curious if anyone is seeing any warblers besides the usual five (Yellow-rumped, Yellow, Wilson’s, Orange-crowned, Townsend’s) coming through? I saw the March reports of Blackburnian and Painted Redstart, but usually there are a lot more reports of unusual warblers by now. Thoughts?

David Trissel
San Diego, CA

Kitchen Creek

Catherine Zinsky
 

Thanks to Tom Meixner's great directions, I easily found two Gray Vireo on the Pacific Crest Trail.  Heard them before I saw them, and they were extremely co-operative for the camera!  Did not see the Canyon Wren, though I looked and looked.  Next time.

It was fantastic birding today all around,  Highlights were:
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Nashville Warblers
Warbling Vireo
Golden-crowned Sparrows
Black-chinned Sparrow
Bullock's Orioles
Steller's Jay
California Quail
Black-headed Grosbeak
Lazuli Bunting --no photo, though:-(

Could use some help confirming ID on two birds please:
Sharp-shinned Hawk --I think.
Pacific-slope Flycatcher (thought at first it was a Willow, but now not sure.)

Photos of these two species are on my flicker: https://www.flickr.com/photos/122472313@N07/

Thanks in advance for your help!
--
Waggin' tails,

Catherine


Author of "Attitude + Attention =Teamwork!
                           Seven Steps to Success"
Available thru www.gettoready.net

Competitive Obedience Toolbox: www.gettoready.net

Ch Borderfame Soul Train UDX, OM ('Kellan the Felon' a.k.a. 'Sir Barkalot')
OTCH Sporting Fields Summer Solstice, UDX 9, OGM ("Dax", as in "Dax of the Long Tongue" aka 'Sir Lickalot'))
Ch. OTCH Sporting Field's Quantum Leap UDX2, OM4  ('Devon' as in 'Devon the Usurper'  aka "Monkey")   
Ch. OTCH Trumagik Step Aside, UDX 20, OGM   (2002 - 2015)
Shorewind Spellbound's Dragon Rider  ("Echo")
 
 

Bird Apps

mikewittmer0582@...
 

I got some really good leads regarding guides for Thailand.  I've booked with one recommend by members of the group.  Now, I was wondering if any of you have an iPhone app for birds of Thailand.  I'm having a hard time finding any app for birds of Thailand.  Thank you.

Brown thrasher in Spring Valley

Mark Stratton
 

Rich just contacted me and he has a brown thrasher in Spring Valley, that he believes has been there since Sunday. He just got back today to look for the bird and relocated it and has good looks at it it is at the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge and Spring Valley at the singer Lane access. Go 1 mile down river at the Woodbridge and it is on the west side.

Mark Stratton North Park, currently in Texas

Re: Blackburnian Warbler, La Jolla boobies

Stan Walens
 

FYI: high count of brown boobies was 13+ on the Rancho Santa Fe CBC, 01/03/2017, 9 in the count circle, and 4+ just to the south of the circle, feeding over the orca pod.

San Diego CBC on 12/16/2016 had either 11 or 13.
Otherwise, they've been few and far between.

Stan Walens
San Diego



On Apr 13, 2017, at 2:37 PM, Barbara Carlson barbarac2003@... [SanDiegoRegionBirding] <SanDiegoRegionBirding-noreply@...> wrote:


…..
And also early today, a La Jolla seawatch by Paul Lehman produced a good total of 7 Brown Boobies, all feeding simultaneously--probably the high count for county waters since back in December on the CBC; also 2 of the 3 continuing Black Oystercatchers, and a very good northbound flight of Pacific Loons (but only a measly 20 Black-vented Shearwaters).

--Barbara Carlson,  San Diego

Blackburnian Warbler, La Jolla boobies

Barbara
 

This morning (13 April) the wintering female Blackburnian Warbler, looking brighter in yellow-orange tones, continues in the pines along Hibiscus Lane on Vacation Island. And also early today, a La Jolla seawatch by Paul Lehman produced a good total of 7 Brown Boobies, all feeding simultaneously--probably the high count for county waters since back in December on the CBC; also 2 of the 3 continuing Black Oystercatchers, and a very good northbound flight of Pacific Loons (but only a measly 20 Black-vented Shearwaters).

--Barbara Carlson,  San Diego




FOS Bell's Vireo

Catherine Zinsky
 

Bell's Vireo seen today at Mission Trails regional Park along the riparian area along the road down Gate 9.  Black-headed Grosbeak , a very joyous Bewick's Wren, and Western Kingbird also seen.


--
Waggin' tails,

Catherine


Author of "Attitude + Attention =Teamwork!
                           Seven Steps to Success"
Available thru www.gettoready.net

Competitive Obedience Toolbox: www.gettoready.net

Ch Borderfame Soul Train UDX, OM ('Kellan the Felon' a.k.a. 'Sir Barkalot')
OTCH Sporting Fields Summer Solstice, UDX 9, OGM ("Dax", as in "Dax of the Long Tongue" aka 'Sir Lickalot'))
Ch. OTCH Sporting Field's Quantum Leap UDX2, OM4  ('Devon' as in 'Devon the Usurper'  aka "Monkey")   
Ch. OTCH Trumagik Step Aside, UDX 20, OGM   (2002 - 2015)
Shorewind Spellbound's Dragon Rider  ("Echo")
 
 

Desert trip

thomas meixner
 

Yesterday I decided to take a Desert run for migrants. I began the day at Kitchen Creek then went up S-2 to Aguascalientes's Caliente and finally stopped at Tamarisk Campground.  I drove 230 miles for the day.

Birds of interest were 2 Gray Vireos on the PCT along with 2 Lazuli Buntings and a Canyon Wren. Just for laughs I stopped at the old Dolomite Mine along S-2 where to my surprise I had 1 Le Conte's Thrasher. My next stop was at Agua Caliente where I saw a Sage Thrasher, a Nashville Warbler, a female Scott's Oriole and an estimated 40 Phainopeplas. My last stop took me to Tamarisk Grove where I saw the Long-eared Owl.

What truly upset me at Tamarisk Grove was the very nice Ranger telling me of how VERY RUDE birders can be. He told me he had to chase people away from a paid camp site where the owl was roosting. COME ON PEOPLE PLEASE BEHAVE YOURSELVES WHEN BIRDING. DO NOT BE RUDE, TRAMPLE OTHERS PRIVACY AND ABOVE ALL DON'T BE OBNOXIOUS. IT REALLY PUTS OUR COMMUNITY IN A BAD LIGHT.

Tom "Mt. Goat" Meixner

SDFO Meeting announcement: Translocation of the Rimatara Lory in the South Pacific: Success or Failure?

Justyn Stahl
 

SDFO Event – Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 6:00 pm is our next meeting of San Diego Field Ornithologists.

Program: "Translocation of the Rimatara Lory in the South Pacific: Success or Failure?" by Bruce Rideout

The Pacific islands harbor some of the most interesting and beautiful birds in the world, but many species have gone extinct since the arrival of Polynesians and Europeans, due to hunting, habitat loss, and the impact of introduced predators and diseases. Those that have survived are among the most endangered birds in the world. In 2007, a small population of Rimatara Lories was translocated from the island of Rimatara in French Polynesia to Atiu in the Cook Islands in order to establish a second population as a hedge against extinction. In 2016, the original translocation team revisited Atiu to assess the success of this effort by conducting a survey of the translocated population and evaluating progress in the eradication effort for introduced mynahs. In this presentation, Bruce will provide a brief background for this conservation effort, present the conclusions of the program assessment, and share photos and recordings of the birds of Atiu.

Bruce Rideout is a pathologist and disease investigation specialist for the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park, where he is director of the Wildlife Disease Laboratories. He received his DVM and PhD degrees from the University of California, Davis, completed a pathology residency at the National Zoo in Washington DC, and is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists. He is also a Research Fellow of The Peregrine Fund and participates in a variety of conservation efforts, including recovery programs for California condors, Mojave Desert tortoises, and Hawaiian forest birds. His research focuses primarily on infectious diseases of wildlife, avian embryo pathology, and disease risk assessments for reintroduction programs. In his spare time, he studies the songs and calls of terrestrial birds, and helps to organize pelagic birding trips for Buena Vista Audubon.


Click here for Meeting Details and Map.

Meetings are open to the public, but SDFO membership is encouraged. Click here for SDFO membership instructions.

 

Justyn Stahl

San Diego Field Ornithologists

Vice President/Program Chair

Carlsbad Chestnut-sided Warbler continues Wed. April 12

Susan Smith
 

Tito's wintering Chestnut-sided Warbler  (T. Gonzales, first report Nov 26, 2016) was seen again today, near the given 6355 Corte del Aberto, Carlsbad,  address. It was first found at about 7:45 am, east of its previously reported location, in the row of eucalyptuses on the hill in back of the Del Abeto Commerce Center area, viewed from the paved area in back of a large building, where there are 1-2 dumpsters. This is on the east (right) side of Corte del Aberto. The bird has nearly  completed its molt into breeding plumage, is looking pretty spiffy, and singing pretty regularly.   

Susan Smith
Seiurus Biological  Consulting
Del Mar, CA 


WH Woodpecker - no

Nancy Christensen
 

My Ebird needs list today listed White-headed Woodpeckers at Fry Creek Campground on Palomar. For some reason, WH Woodpeckers are not listed as rare in that area even though it has been years since one was reported there. Too bad, as I wish I knew if the birds were identified by sound or sight. Anyway, I went up and spent some time this afternoon looking and listening. Sadly, I did not find any WH Woodpeckers. I did hear one rattle call that I could not identify, but never found the bird. Mountain Quail were around the campground calling from several directions.

I made a quick stop at Lake Henshaw and found 2 of the continuing Lewis's Woodpeckers.