Date   

Solitary Sandpiper Robb Field Mudflats

Nathan French
 

Sorry for the hasty update earlier. SOSA was at Mudflats hotspot near Robb Field OB approximately here (32.7554593, -117.2423973) at 8:30 but I was unable to relocate it after it flushed. A pair of Cooper’s Hawks and lots of loose dogs kept everything moving around.

Nathan French
Hillcrest


Solitary Sandpiper at Mudflats

Nathan French
 

Found around 8:30 AM near the first few parking spots. Flew to westernmost pond and is still there.

Nathan French
Hillcrest


bird & butterfly garden drip

RICHARD CUTHBERTSON
 

If you've visited the bird and butterfly garden lately you'll notice the drip has been shut off.  The Ranger in charge says that it is only temporary, that there is a leak and they are waiting for a plumber.


La Jolla Cove, Aug 20, 2019: storm-petrels

Stan Walens
 

After days without any storm-petrels in the Cove, today I watched as a dozen or so Ashy Storm-petrels flew in from the south.
They were working the near patch of smooth water directly north from my bench [so in line with the 2-mile buoy off of Del Mar].
A very few Black Storm-petrels were much further out in the canyon.
I got a brief glimpse of a smaller storm-petrel, possibly a Least, but not seen well enough to identify for sure.

I also wanted to note that, if the Masked Booby reported on a whale-watching trip turns out to be that species, in a 24-hour period on August 17–18, all 5 species of booby were seen in San Diego County.

Stan Walens, San Diego
August 20, 2019; 9:45 am


Laguna Mtns.--Agua Dulce Creek

Larry Edwards
 

I saw two immature MacGillivray's Warblers this morning, previously reported by Nancy Christianson; uncooperative in terms of photos, being low in the bushes along the creek and in deep shade. Also a couple of immature Western Wood-Pewees. The creek is still running, but quite low.

Pleasant early morning -- about 60 degrees when I arrived at 7 a.m. -- but got quite warm by 10.

Anyone going to the area, be advised -- after 7 a.m. construction crews have sections of Sunrise Hwy down to one lane between the freeway exit and the village, so expect delays; weekends probably not affected.
--
Larry Edwards
San Diego, CA


RFI Ridgway’s Rail

Andrew Culshaw
 

Hi Everyone

I’ll be in San Diego next week with 3 days free for birding. I’ve got a couple of whale trips lined up but would like to try to see Ridgway’s Rail. Ebird suggests Tijuana Slough NWR is a place to see this and the general birding also seems good there. Looks like the trails around the visitor centre are favoured, but can anyone please recommend a particular area or any tips for connecting with the rail? Replies off list if you prefer. 

Good birding,
Andrew Culshaw,


Sunday Aug. 18, 2019 Buena Vista Audubon pelagic

David Povey
 

We had a good day offshore with some surprises, and an unplanned adventure.
First off a Red-footed Booby came into the boat twice for as close a look as anyone could hope. This bird about 22 n.miles west of the tip of Point Loma. 
Next was an adult Nazca Booby again came into the boat at about 26 n.miles from the Point. This bird right on the Mexican border and could be counted in both countries if one wished.
Last was a photographed Townsend's Storm-Petrel.
Other birds seen were Pink-footed, Sooty and Black-vented Shearwaters, Black, Ashy, Leach's chapmani, Storm-Petrels. Red and Red-necked Phalaropes, Parasitic Jaeger, Craveri's Murrelets, Cassin's Auklet, Sabine's Gulls, Common, Least, Elegant, Royal and Caspian Terns.
Also seen Elephant seal, California Sea Lion, Common and inshore Bottle-nosed Dolphin.
and last a Mako Shark.
Then the adventure. As we turned to move up the Thirty Mile Bank the starboard propeller shaft snapped, the prop slipped back into the rudder and we were dead in the water !! Now only able to turn circles on one engine. 
This required a crew member to go over the side and to tie off the prop shaft to pull the prop and shaft off the rudder. The first try broke the rope! The second try with a number of crew, passengers and leaders pulling succeeded.   We now had steering back but running on one engine. We worked and birded our way back to San Diego Bay.
Tough pill to take as the Thirty Mile Bank seemed to have a fair amount of life and further  exploration certainly would have been ideal. Still nice to know skill and knowledge of the crew got us home safely. Sad that we cut the trip some what short and that owner / Captain James will lose some of his prime fishing season to put the boat in the yard for repairs.
We will be back and ready to go for the next trip Sept. 22nd
Dave Povey
Dulzura


La Jolla Cove August 18, 2019: 2 black terns

Stan Walens
 

Went to the Cove while all the good birders in town are out on the pelagic trip. A gazillion dolphins, maybe 1500 black-vented shearwaters, hundreds of migrating phalaropes.
A pair of black terns was the highlight of the morning.

Then went to look for the common tern reported yesterday at Robb Field. No success there.

Stan Walens, San Diego
August 18, 2019; 12:20 pm


Swinhoe's (Japanese) White-eyes in Pt Loma

Sara Baase Mayers
 

Two Swinhoe's White-eyes were in our yard this morning (Aug. 18).  I puzzled over them for a long time, ruling out Nashville and Virginia's Warblers before I thought of white-eyes and looked up photos of them.  Based on the reports on eBird, these might be the southernmost. (I'll post a detailed description to eBird.)

======================
Sara Mayers
Point Loma (San Diego)
======================


Lesser Yellowlegs, Reddish Egret, N. Red Bishop

Justyn Stahl
 

The highlights from various locations in the TRV and the San Diego River today, 17 August included:

REDDISH EGRET continuing at J St.

A male NORTHERN RED BISHOP (ooh ahh) was at the mostly overgrown “stick pond” at Dairy Mart, where perhaps more notable was an adult LEAST TERN circling.

The sod farm actually had green irrigated sod but it was totally devoid of any birds.

An adult COMMON TERN was at the Robb Field stretch of the San Diego River, and up stream just east of the 2nd bridge (Old Sea World Drive), were three LESSER YELLOWLEGS.

Justyn Stahl, with Sadowski, Desnoyers, and visiting birder Ryan Shaw


Hornblower Aug 16 & La Jolla Cove, Aug 17: Black-vented shearwaters and a Franklin's gull

Stan Walens
 

Was out on the Hornblower yesterday. It was a mono-species day. Somewhere between 2000-2500 black-vented shearwaters. Hard to count because the boat turns in circles as it follows the one whale it finds. But one raft of black-vents was over 1000 birds. There were so many shearwaters circling the boat that even the Whalers were astonished. No other species of shearwater, no storm-petrels, no alcids [even though conditions were great for seeing them if there’d been any].

Almost the same today at the Cove except even more black-vents. I counted 120/minute streaming north into the canyon for close to an hour.
Probably somewhere around 5000 total, possibly more.
No other tubenoses. No boobies. No alcids.
Hundreds and hundreds of common dolphins everywhere, with swarms of shearwaters following them.

A first-winter Franklin’s gull was roosting on the rocks beneath my bench when I got there, but was almost immediately chased off by tourists trying to see how close they could get to the sea lions.
The gull flew deeper into the Cove and may have landed on the cliffs or headed to the beach at La Jolla Shores, but I was distracted by the multitudes of shearwaters and hoping for something besides a black-vent, and didn’t feel like chasing it.

Stan Walens, San Diego
August 17, 2019; 1:00 pm


Sunday Aug. 18, 2019 Buena Vista Audubon and Grande pelagic

David Povey
 

Just a reminder that the BVAS and Grande 12 hr. trip is this Sunday. 
Parking will be very tight.
Fishing is exceptionally good right now, several construction projects have cut into the local street parking, and to top it all off the America's Finest City Half Marathon will close off portions of Scott St., and North Harbor Dr. 
I highly recommend an early arrival to find parking, and check in at the H&M Landing office by 
6 a.m. the marathon starts at 6:15 a.m. out at Cabrillo. N.M.
I do plan to get the boat away from the dock on time  !
See you there,
Dave Povey
Dulzura


Migrant Wilson's Warbler in Vista

Terence Brashear
 

Was pleasantly surprised to see an adult Wilson's Warbler bathing on the shrubbery that had been recently watered late today.  First one I have seen in the area so assuming it is a migrant.

Not earth-shattering, but a nice sighting.

Regards,

Terry Brashear
San Diego County
birdnird@...


Re: Laguna - fall arrivals

Nancy Christensen
 

A correction – I believe the two birds I listed as Nashville Warblers were actually hatch year female-type MacGillivray’s. Both had complete gray collars, just paler under chin, not split collars as a Nashville would have. Sorry!

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 

From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io <SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nancy Christensen via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, August 12, 2019 1:17 PM
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io
Cc: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Laguna - fall arrivals

 

This morning (Monday Aug 12) I visited the Agua Dulce area in the Laguna Mountains. Hummingbirds were numerous, with Rufous/Allens being the most common type. All were hatch year young birds. I assume they were probably Rufous, but cannot absolutely confirm that. Warblers were present in fair numbers for the mountains: Hermits, Wilson’s, Black-throated Grays, Orange-crowns  and MacGillivray’s were all seen.

 

The Twilight Zone portion of the walk involved a SORA perched in a sapling Black Oak tree about ½ mile from the nearest water. When I saw this bird, it was not immediately obvious to me what it was because it was blocked by foliage. Eventually I got looks at enough parts that I could ID it, and get some record photos. It was about 3 feet off the ground, awkwardly walking along the branch picking something off the leaves. This totally unexpected encounter teaches me that birds don’t always do what you think they should do!

 

Checklist from this morning (with Sora pics!): https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58944968

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 


Off-topic: ordering Steve Howell's new Oceanic Birds of the World at a discount

Stan Walens
 

I am about to order a copy of Steve Howell’s new book, _Oceanic Birds of the World: A Photo Guide_, published by Princeton University Press.
Since my first book was published by PUP, I can order their books at a discount.

As I’ve done before with PUP books, I am willing to order copies for others in the SD birding community at that discount.
The book lists at $35 + tax. Amazon is selling it at $28.50 + tax.

My total cost is a little bit shy of $25/copy, including tax and shipping [exact amount depends on how many copies I order, but that’s the ballpark figure].

If you’re interested, contact me off-list.
I’d like to place the order in the next day or two, since I’m eager to start reading it.

Stan Walens, San Diego
August 12, 2019; 2:00 pm


Laguna - fall arrivals

Nancy Christensen
 

This morning (Monday Aug 12) I visited the Agua Dulce area in the Laguna Mountains. Hummingbirds were numerous, with Rufous/Allens being the most common type. All were hatch year young birds. I assume they were probably Rufous, but cannot absolutely confirm that. Warblers were present in fair numbers for the mountains: Hermits, Wilson’s, Black-throated Grays, Orange-crowns  and MacGillivray’s were all seen.

 

The Twilight Zone portion of the walk involved a SORA perched in a sapling Black Oak tree about ½ mile from the nearest water. When I saw this bird, it was not immediately obvious to me what it was because it was blocked by foliage. Eventually I got looks at enough parts that I could ID it, and get some record photos. It was about 3 feet off the ground, awkwardly walking along the branch picking something off the leaves. This totally unexpected encounter teaches me that birds don’t always do what you think they should do!

 

Checklist from this morning (with Sora pics!): https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58944968

 

Nancy Christensen

Ramona

 


Miscellanea

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

Today, Monday, there was a fall arrival Blue-wing Teal with several cinnamon teal at the main Dairy Mart pond, where also a couple least bitterns, and a coastal arrival Prairie Falcon bordering the salt works. The family group of nesting burrowing owls continues well eastsoutheast of the north end of 13th Street. Similar to the last couple years in August, multiple barn owls have been hunting in daylight over the Tijuana River channel weeds visible from the Dairy Mart Road bridge during overcast mornings.

Saturday morning at La Jolla, in addition to the previously reported ashy storm-petrel and common murre, there was a good count for August of 2000 Black-vented shearwaters and the usual 50 or 60 black storm-petrels, plus one brown booby.

Paul Lehman, San Diego

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REMINDER: Tuesday, 13 August, SDFO meeting - - one week early this month!

Barbara
 

Our meeting this month will be held on Tuesday, August 13, at 6:00 PM, in the Hoffman Room of the San Diego Foundation Building, 2508 Historic Decatur Rd. NOTE THAT THIS IS A WEEK EARLIER THAN USUAL because of room availability. 

Our program this month features Susan Farabaugh, Ph.D., Associate Director, Recovery Ecology, San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. She will present “Of Aga and ‘Alalā—Conserving Endangered Corvids on Pacific Islands”. San Diego Zoo Global’s Hawaiian Endangered Bird Conservation Program (HEBCP) has been active in conservation breeding of critically endangered Hawaiian birds since the mid-1990’s.  

Susan Farabaugh grew up in Southern California and was first introduced to the fascination of birds at Occidental College under Dr. Luis Baptista. She obtained her PhD from the University of Maryland College Park studying dueting behavior of tropical Thryothorus wrens in Panama and Venezuela. As a postdoc, she worked on song sharing in group-living Australian Magpies in New Zealand and Australia. It is worth noting that on the way to New Zealand, she stopped in Hawaii to visit a friend who had recently been hired to manage the small breeding colony of ‘Alala, then located at Pohakuloa on the slopes of Mauna Kea. While analyzing magpie song back in Maryland, she became involved in research of perception and neurobiology of vocal learning in birds. This led to a postdoc on neural control of learned vocalization in parrots and songbirds at Auckland University in New Zealand. On her return to the USA in 1997, she took what she thought was a short-term job with the San Diego Zoo assisting the HEBCP with behavioral monitoring of breeding of ‘Alala. This proved to be a major change of direction, and she joined the permanent effort of conservation breeding of the San Clemente Loggerhead Shrike in 1999 and has been managing the shrike program since 2006. In 2015, she became an Associate Director and now manages both shrikes and the HEBCP. 

Next month’s meeting is on Tuesday, September 17. Charlene Glacy will tell us what it is like to count albatrosses on Midway Island.   

Barbara Carlson
SDFO Membership Chair



Yellow-crowned Night Herons at Batiquitos Lagoon

Paula Theobald
 

Three Yellow-crowned Night Herons, two adults and a juvenile, were observed this morning at the lagoon at two locations.  All three were seen at the same time spread out along the reedy shoreline along the I5, south of the I5 bridge. One adult and the juvenile flew across the lagoon and into a small tree/large bush on the trail that leads from the Gabbiano Lane parking area towards the I5. We didn’t see any of the three under the bridge as others have observed.

Paula Theobald
Oceanside 

It’s a magical world, Hobbes, ol’ buddy…Let’s go exploring!


La Jolla road access and current Birds

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

While the steep one-way road down the hill at La Jolla past the Cave Store is indeed now closed, all one needs to do is continue past that on Prospect to Girard and then turn right and go down the little hill and you come into La Jolla Cove just at the east end of the regular parking stretch, the same road you normally leave on, so all the parking that one normally uses for La Jolla Cove is still currently accessible and usable.

So far this morning (Saturday) I have had an ashy storm-petrel present off and on for a half hour and one southbound Common Murre.

Paul Lehman, San Diego

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