Date   

Bank Swallow

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

Friday morning at 7:00 a.m. there's a Bank Swallow roosting with Rough-wingeds and Cliffs in the dead twigs on the middle pond at Dairy Mart, viewable from the only cut in the vegetation halfway down the east side of that pond. Be careful at this time of year with juvenile Tree Swallows, which often show weaker breast-bands.

Yesterday at La Jolla it was just the standard ca. 800 Black-vented Shearwaters offshore, and presumably the Black Turnstone there on the rocks was the first of the fall arrivals, as I do not believe one was there since the beginning of June.


Oystercatcher Anarchy

thomasf_h
 

Don Robertson has an interesting write up here of the failings of using the jehl scale for an unintended purpose of determining hybrids vs “pure” frazeri ssp:


Another thing to note is that the July bird and the April bird look to be the same individual. Oystercatchers undergo a definitive prebasic molt from April-December. This results in the birds appearing to score higher on the scale over time as the fresh feathers feature more white, whereas black pigment is more resistant to wear and thus appears more extensive in worn feathers.

So what does this all mean? The entire palliatus/frazeri/bachmani complex really deserves a scientific study of their underlying genetics to better understand the separation between the three forms. We really have no idea what is going on with the underlying genetics of the western form of American Oystercatcher, H. p. frazeri, as compared to Black Oystercatcher, bachmani, and the ABA's eastern/southern form; H. p. palliatus. The Jehl paper was published before the invention of genetic sequencing and the work is unfortunately a poor substitute for what is possible today. Using the arbitrary round cutoff of 30 is really just a stop gap that infers that only the whitest individuals can safely be placed in the American Oystercatcher category. As Jehl himself states, he calculated a mean of 38.6 where there was overlap between frazeri and palliatus, and a mean of 28.3 in Baja, where there was an overlap of frazeri and bachmani. We are inferring that this lower mean in Baja is a result of the introduction of ancestral genes into the frazeri population remaining from hybridization in the 1920-1930s with bachmani. We could just as easily place the cutoff on the more scientifically based mean of the bimodal distribution of both parent species from assortative mating, which would result in a cutoff value of 28. In reality, to make a strong argument for identification it would be far easier to just collect and sequence the DNA of subject birds. On the other hand, if we find out from genetic studies that frazeri just represents a hybrid swarm (perhaps unlikely given Jehl's findings of assortative mating?), then identification criteria may not really matter...

Tom Ford-Hutchinson
San Diego, CA


Re: American Oystercatcher(?)

David Trissel
 

OK, I’ve had time to compile the many submissions (actually only one) of Jehl Scale ratings on the bird. Due to confidentiality, I am not going to disclose the author without his permission, but I wanted to close the loop and let everyone know what the experts are saying.

First, the Jehl scale:

---------------
Jehl considered birds with character scores from 0-9 Black, 10-29 hybrids, and 30-38 American.
Upper tail coverts		0	black, as in bachmani
				1	black, a few white mottlings
				2	nearly equally black and white
				3	white, a few black mottlings
				4	white, as in palliatus

Tail				0	black, as in bachmani
				1	mainly black, trace of white at base of vanes
				2	basal quarter of rectrices white
				3	basal third of rectrices white
				4	basal half of rectrices white, as in palliatus

Chest				0	black, with black chest band extending smoothly onto mid-belly, as in bachmani
				1	black chest band extending onto upper third of belly
				2	black chest band extending onto upper quarter of belly
				3	black chest band bordered by ragged edge on upper breast
				4	black chest band sharply delimited from white of upper chest, as in palliatus

Belly				0	blackish, as in bachmani
				1	blackish, with traces of white on a few feathers
				2	blackish, white area around crissum
				3	three quarters black, one quarter white
				4	nearly equally black and white
				5	three quarters white, one quarter black
				6	entirely white, as in palliatus

Under tail coverts		0	entirely black, as in bachmani
				1	mainly black with slight white mottling
				2	nearly equally black and white
				3	mainly white
				4	entirely white, as in palliatus

Thighs				0	entirely black, as in bachmani
				1	black with grayish underdown, not noticable externally
				2	puffs of grayish down noticeable
				3	mainly white
				4	entirely white, as in palliatus
	
Greater secondary coverts 	0	lacking, as in bachmani
   (width of white edging	1	less than 2 mm
   in folded wing)		2	2-5 mm
				3	6-15 mm
				4	more than 15 mm

Extent of white wing stripe	0	lacking, as in bachmani
				1	white markings confined to inner half of secondaries
				2	white markings extend to outer secondaries, but not onto primaries
				3	white present on some or all of inner five primaries
				4	white present on at least one of primaries 6-10

Underwing coverts		0	entirely black, as in bachmani
				1	mainly black, some white mottling
				2	nearly equally black and white
				3	mainly white
				4	white, as in palliatus
	
Axillars			0	black, as in bachmani
				1	mainly black, some white mottling
				2	nearly equally black and white
				3	mainly white
				4	white, as in palliatus	
———————

Now, the ratings received on the July 9 bird:

Upper tail coverts	(1-2)	
				1	black, a few white mottlings
				2	nearly equally black and white

Tail			(1)	
				1	mainly black, trace of white at base of vanes
Chest			(3)	
				3	black chest band bordered by ragged edge on upper breast

Belly			(6)	
				6	entirely white, as in palliatus
Under tail coverts	(3)	
				3	mainly white

Thighs			(4)	
				4	entirely white, as in palliatus
Greater secondary coverts (3)	
   (width of white edging	
   in folded wing)		
				3	6-15 mm
				
Extent of white wing stripe (1)	
				1	white markings confined to inner half of secondaries
				
Underwing coverts	(3)	
				3	mainly white
				
Axillars		(4)	
				4	white, as in palliatus	

	Total = 29 or 30
That puts the bird squarely in … well, I don’t know. 29 is considered a hybrid and 30 is considered an American.

In discussion with others, all admittedly NOT experts, there is possibly some white specks on the outer secondaries and/or primaries. If that is true, then the rating jumps up well into the American range.

At this point, you could stop and draw your own conclusion and not read any further. The pictures are very good and the Jehl Scale can be used to rate this bird along the lines of the above.

— Everything below here are just my notes on what I have learned in doing this exercise —

I’m embarrassed to say that I have looked at far too many American Oystercatcher photos on eBird over the last few days. Of the 29,763 photos in eBird (just American Oystercatcher), the vast majority are of the “normal” Haematopus palliatus. I was most interested in the “fazari” subspecies which is most likely to show up in California. So, narrowing down to just Mexico, there are 544 photos. Narrowing it further to the west Mexico (Nayarit, Sinaloa, Sonora, Baja and Baja Sur), you get down to 84, 69, 127, 73, and 52 photos respectively. So, about 400 photos.

Some observations:

1. H. palliatus fazari definitely have “hybrid” characteristics that look like Black Oystercatcher genes are mixed in there. Now, whether those are “ancient” hybrid genes from back when Black and American were closer or if they are “new” hybrid genes is debatable. For this discussion, we will accept that Haematopus palliatus fazari is American Oystercatcher. Regardless, on H. p. fazari, you’ll see a ragged line between black and white on the chest and the black extends lower towards the belly than in H. palliatus. You’ll also see less white on the upper wings and some slight mottling on the front edge of the underwing coverts. The upper tail coverts are a mix of black and white.

2. Nearly all of the photos of west Mexico appear to be H. p. fazari. The extent of white wing stripe almost never appears on the primaries (so far I found one in Baja and one in Nayarit that had a small white mark on a primary). The white appears to be restricted to the upper wing coverts and, as a rule, is not on the secondaries or primaries. So, if that is true, nearly all fazari would get a Jehl score of 1  for that characteristic. NOTE: I found a Sonora photo of 11 in flight together and not one of those birds shows any white in the primaries.

3. Underwing coverts - H. p. fazari, almost as a rule, appear to have some brown mottling on the leading edge of the underwing coverts. But, even some otherwise “pure” H. palliatus (NY, CT, MA) show a little brown on that leading edge. NOTE: I found a New York photo of 5 in flight together and at least 3 of them have that same characteristic. 

4. I think the biggest marks against the July 9 bird being an American are the upper tail coverts and the tail. If those two characteristics alone were the determining characteristics, I think you’d have to conclude this is a hybrid. Otherwise, I think one would be hard-pressed to say the other characteristics do not fall well into the fazari range.

5. In looking at the photos of the July 9 bird, the May 13 bird, and the April 8 bird, the July 9 bird is the “cleanest” of the three and has the best photos of the main Jehl scale characteristics. The April 8 bird is VERY similar and has just a little more black extending in a V shape further down the chest, but otherwise looks nearly identical to the July 9 bird.

I would love to hear what others think. I welcome a lively and constructive discussion. 

Sincerely,

David Trissel
San Diego, CA


On Jul 9, 2021, at 5:13 PM, David Trissel <dtrisse1@...> wrote:

Here’s a link to a Flickr album with Mandy Etpison’s photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/62366066@N02/shares/37cUc2

David Trissel
San Diego, CA

On Jul 9, 2021, at 4:13 PM, David Trissel <dtrisse1@...> wrote:

OK, since it’s the summer doldrums and we have nothing better to do anyway, let’s have some fun with the Oystercatcher found this morning by John Dumlao and then subsequently photographed by a few folks. The bird was originally found at 6:23-ish at the Point La Jolla Seawatch spot, standing on the rocks below. It flew south past Children’s pool and landed about a 1/3 mile south of there out on a point where it stuck around for 30 minutes until a guy and his dogs went out on the rocky point and chased it off. It flew south but then returned to the flat rocks below the cliffs, again about 1/3 mile south of Children’s.

 I don’t know if Mandy Etpison’s photos attached below will come through (this group email system tends to strip them) but they are spectacular. If they get stripped I’ll see if I can get and post a link to them.

DAB DAB checklist with good flight shots: https://ebird.org/checklist/S91488528

John Dumlao checklist with one flight shot: https://ebird.org/checklist/S91496254 

My checklist with description and distant and far less professional pics here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S91494335

For those of you (like me) that are interested in the Jehl Scale and how American Oystercatchers are rated by the experts, here it is: https://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/jehl.txt

I’m not an experienced at rating American Oystercatchers, so I’ll only weigh in with my two cents in a follow-up email.

Enjoy!

David Trissel
San Diego, CA



Congratulations to Tom Ingram

Lisa Heinz
 

Did everyone already note Tom Ingram's photo of an (ex-) acorn woodpecker in Audubon's magazine's 2021 Audubon Photography Awards issue? There was a La Jolla peregrine in the photo as well.

Lisa Heinz
Coronado


Congratulations to Tom Ingram (coastal

Lisa Heinz
 

Did everyone already note Tom Ingram's photo of an (ex-) acorn woodpecker in Audubon's magazine's 2021 Audubon Photography Awards issue? There was a La Jolla peregrine in the photo as well.

Lisa Heinz
Coronado


Reddish Egrets in Oceanside

Kenneth Weaver
 

My wife and I observed two adult Reddish Egrets at the mouth of the San Luis Rey River
this morning at 0835.  One individual showed much brighter reddish coloration on the
neck.  The river mouth is now blocked by a large sandbar.  The birds were in the
"lagoon" just east of the sandbar.  They were absent when we returned to the area at 
0930.  I'll post a few record shots on eBird later.

Ken Weaver
Fallbrook
gnatcatcher@...


Red-breasted Nuthatch

Mike Wittmer
 

I was shopping at the Home Depot at W. 9th and W. Valley Parkway, Escondido, when I heard the distinct call of a Red-breasted Nuthatch from some nearby pine trees that border 9th Ave..  I had a brief glimpse of the bird and the reddish colored breast and black eyestripe were very clear.  

Mike Wittmer
Escondido, Ca


Crown Point Yellow-headed blackbird

Jim Roberts GMAIL
 

This morning (7/12/21) at 8:45, an adult, male YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD was foraging on the lawn in the nprtheastern section of Crown Point.  I returned at 9:40 and it was still there.  Photos later on ebird.

                                     Jim Roberts
                                     University City


offshore San Diego Sunday: 9 COOK'S PETRELS, South Polar Skua, 7 Craveri's, 4 Leach's

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

A trip offshore to the 30-Mile Bank and "The Corner" in San Diego County waters on Sunday the 11th, produced a total of ca. 9 COOK'S PETRELS, 8 at The Corner (32-33 mi offshore) and 1 bird much closer in to shore at the INNER part of the San Diego Trough only some 16.4 nm west of Point Loma. Lots of excellent photos obtained of several of the Cook's, which should appear later in eBird reports. Also at The Corner was a worn South Polar Skua and ca. 4 Leach's Storm-Petrels of various rump colors. A total of ca. 7 Craveri's Murrelets (plus another 5-7 murrelet sp.) were seen scattered during the trip (mostly in the Trough and at 30-Mile), as well as 5 Ashy Storm-Petrels, 8 Cassin's Auklets, 1 Brown Booby, and 1 Common Tern. OK numbers of Pink-footed and Sooty Shearwaters, Black Storm-Petrels, and Red-necked Phalaropes.

--Paul Lehman, Dave Povey, Matt Sadowski, Curtis Marantz.


"the" oystercatcher continues

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

The black-and-white oystercatcher flew by the sea watch at La Jolla this morning, Saturday, at 5:56 a.m. in loose company with all three of the black oystercatchers that have been here for a long time, and they landed apparently just north of children's pool. At least for now.

Paul Lehman, San Diego


Re: American Oystercatcher(?)

David Trissel
 

Here’s a link to a Flickr album with Mandy Etpison’s photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/62366066@N02/shares/37cUc2

David Trissel
San Diego, CA

On Jul 9, 2021, at 4:13 PM, David Trissel <dtrisse1@...> wrote:

OK, since it’s the summer doldrums and we have nothing better to do anyway, let’s have some fun with the Oystercatcher found this morning by John Dumlao and then subsequently photographed by a few folks. The bird was originally found at 6:23-ish at the Point La Jolla Seawatch spot, standing on the rocks below. It flew south past Children’s pool and landed about a 1/3 mile south of there out on a point where it stuck around for 30 minutes until a guy and his dogs went out on the rocky point and chased it off. It flew south but then returned to the flat rocks below the cliffs, again about 1/3 mile south of Children’s.

 I don’t know if Mandy Etpison’s photos attached below will come through (this group email system tends to strip them) but they are spectacular. If they get stripped I’ll see if I can get and post a link to them.

DAB DAB checklist with good flight shots: https://ebird.org/checklist/S91488528

John Dumlao checklist with one flight shot: https://ebird.org/checklist/S91496254 

My checklist with description and distant and far less professional pics here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S91494335

For those of you (like me) that are interested in the Jehl Scale and how American Oystercatchers are rated by the experts, here it is: https://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/jehl.txt

I’m not an experienced at rating American Oystercatchers, so I’ll only weigh in with my two cents in a follow-up email.

Enjoy!

David Trissel
San Diego, CA

Begin forwarded message:

From: Mandy Etpison
Subject: American oyster catcher
Date: July 9, 2021 at 9:06:15 AM PDT
To:

Hi David,
 
Attached some pics of the bird from this morning. Pls let me know if it is a hybrid when you guys figure it out.
Thanks,
Mandy Etpison
 
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 



La Jolla oystercatcher "scoring": American or hybrid??

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

Based on the fine extensive series of photos taken of today's (9 July) oystercatcher at La Jolla by Dean Budd, Jonathan Casanova, John Dumlao, Mandy Etpison, and Barbara Wise, among others, it is possible to apply the "Jehl scale" with some reasonable degree of accuracy. Curtis Marantz is the first person to take the bait, and his comment are below. If a few other folks would like to do the same, please do! And if you don't have access to any of these sets of photos (see eBird), let me know, offline. FWIW, I think the uppertail coverts are clearly MOSTLY dark.

--Paul Lehman, San Diego

Curtis writes:

It is right on the edge of "good enough," given that I reach 29-30 when I score it with the details below.

It really comes down to whether you think the uppertail coverts are closer to "nearly equally black and white," or instead, mostly black with some white.  If you think there is less than 50% white there, it won't reach the magical number of 30, and I do not see it as being 50% white.  In my experience, a quick rule of thumb is that unless the uppertail coverts are at least 50% white and the undertail coverts are almost entirely white, it won't reach the score you need.  These characters are correlated, so birds that have problems with one or two tend to have problems with the rest.  This said, the vast majority have white bellies, white thighs, and pretty good wing-stripes, so the intermediate birds tend to look far more like American Oystercatchers than Black Oystercatchers, and I see very few that have mostly black underparts with only limited white.

uppertail coverts - 1-2 (to me it is between "black with a few white mottlings" and "nearly equally black and white"; I would have said ¾ black and ¼ white, so maybe best rated at 1½?)
tail - 1 (mainly black, trace of white at base of vanes)
chest - 3 (black chest band bordered by ragged edge on upper breast)
belly - 6 (entirely white, as in palliatus)
undertail - 3 (mainly white)
thighs - 4 (entirely white, as in palliatus)
greater coverts - 3 (6-15 mm, but hard to know for sure unless you can measure it in-hand!)
extent of wing stripe - 1 (white markings confined to inner half of secondaries - actually I have a hard time seeing any white in the secondaries, so maybe more like ½?)
underwing coverts - 3 (mainly white)
axillars - 4 (white, as in palliatus)


American Oystercatcher(?)

David Trissel
 

OK, since it’s the summer doldrums and we have nothing better to do anyway, let’s have some fun with the Oystercatcher found this morning by John Dumlao and then subsequently photographed by a few folks. The bird was originally found at 6:23-ish at the Point La Jolla Seawatch spot, standing on the rocks below. It flew south past Children’s pool and landed about a 1/3 mile south of there out on a point where it stuck around for 30 minutes until a guy and his dogs went out on the rocky point and chased it off. It flew south but then returned to the flat rocks below the cliffs, again about 1/3 mile south of Children’s.

 I don’t know if Mandy Etpison’s photos attached below will come through (this group email system tends to strip them) but they are spectacular. If they get stripped I’ll see if I can get and post a link to them.

DAB DAB checklist with good flight shots: https://ebird.org/checklist/S91488528

John Dumlao checklist with one flight shot: https://ebird.org/checklist/S91496254 

My checklist with description and distant and far less professional pics here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S91494335

For those of you (like me) that are interested in the Jehl Scale and how American Oystercatchers are rated by the experts, here it is: https://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/jehl.txt

I’m not an experienced at rating American Oystercatchers, so I’ll only weigh in with my two cents in a follow-up email.

Enjoy!

David Trissel
San Diego, CA

Begin forwarded message:

From: Mandy Etpison
Subject: American oyster catcher
Date: July 9, 2021 at 9:06:15 AM PDT
To:

Hi David,
 
Attached some pics of the bird from this morning. Pls let me know if it is a hybrid when you guys figure it out.
Thanks,
Mandy Etpison
 
 
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 


Re: Merging Two eBird hotspots…is it possible?

Justyn Stahl
 

Anthony,

Thanks for pointing this out. I've merged the two hotspots. If you, or anyone, comes across needed edits to a hotspot name or location, or if you find a redundancy like this, you can email me directly, or just post a query to the listserv as you've done.

Thanks again,
Justyn Stahl


On Fri, Jul 9, 2021 at 2:25 PM Anthony Fife via groups.io <imtooflytofly=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Good day fellow birders,

Question, I am currently (07/09/2021) sitting at Woodglen Vista Park in Santee, what appears to be a severely under birded park. While looking up the data I noticed two hotspots for the same park, without reason.


Now I know we can “suggest a hotspot”, but it seems difficult for me to find how to email moderators to merge two spots when I happen upon them.

Any advice? I’m not even submitting a list while sitting here because I’m torn as to which spot I want to make the top 10 on 🤣😜…I mean 7th place has 2 species! Must of been a night trip 😱

Thanks,
Anthony “TooFly” Fife
El Cajon, Ca


Merging Two eBird hotspots…is it possible?

Anthony Fife
 

Good day fellow birders,

Question, I am currently (07/09/2021) sitting at Woodglen Vista Park in Santee, what appears to be a severely under birded park. While looking up the data I noticed two hotspots for the same park, without reason.


Now I know we can “suggest a hotspot”, but it seems difficult for me to find how to email moderators to merge two spots when I happen upon them.

Any advice? I’m not even submitting a list while sitting here because I’m torn as to which spot I want to make the top 10 on 🤣😜…I mean 7th place has 2 species! Must of been a night trip 😱

Thanks,
Anthony “TooFly” Fife
El Cajon, Ca


Continuing American-type Oystercatcher, Common tern

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

The American or hybrid oystercatcher was still present as of 8:30 a.m. on rocks with a Black Oystercatcher, now a third of a mile, approximately, south of Children's Pool in La Jolla. Obviously the birds work that whole section of rocky shore from Goldfish Point past the seawatch and all the way well south of children's pool.

I had my first Common tern of the season this morning at the salt works, same as last year roosting with Elegant terns on the strips of mud at the east end of the same impoundment that the Little stint island is in. Closest observation would probably be the end of 11th or Florida St. although the same area can be scoped from the end of 13th. A 1-year-old with a partial hood and a bold dark carpal bar. Typically these Common terns come and go, so if one shows up and there are indeed plenty of Elegant terns roosting there but no Commons, then probably best just to go bird elsewhere for half an hour or so and come back and check again. A few Forsters are around as well.


American or hybrid oystercatcher

lehman.paul@verizon.net
 

Acting as a messenger, David Trissel and Dean Budd and possibly others had an American-type Oystercatcher at La Jolla Cove this morning around 6:30 a.m. and soon thereafter. After a while it flew south and continued south past Children's Pool. The stretch of rocky coast south of Children's Pool is where some of the black oystercatchers have been frequenting recently. The bird today looks better than some of the previous more obvious hybrid oystercatchers, with a cleaner breast demarcation, although it clearly shows an entirely cloudy rump. But most of the rest of it looks better. I've only seen photos on my phone and they are back-of-the-camera shots that Dean took, so we'll know more later when we see better versions of the photos, but the bird may or may not be an acceptable American if one uses the Jehl scale.

Another interesting oystercatcher was photographed a few days ago at the tide pools at Point Loma which did not show enough detail to know whether a barely acceptable American or a hybrid. It could well have been the latter, but it wasn't as obvious as some. It had slightly messier breast than today's La Jolla bird.


Buller's Shearwater, Scripps's, and Craveri's Murrelets offshore July 7, 2021

David Povey
 

I took a non birder friend offshore in hopes of finding a Blue Whale, Wednesday. No luck on the whale.
A Buller's Shearwater moving north over the San Diego Trough at about 20 nautical miles west of Point Loma.was certainly interesting. This bird is either a rather late spring migrant or somewhat early for fall? 
Twenty miles was about the outer limit of today's travel.
Good numbers of Craveri's Murrelets were out over the San Diego Trough. 
A solo Scripps's Murrelet there was on the late-ish date side.
Bluefin Tuna are now above the border, and putting on an impressive show. We saw an acre sized, full on foamer and several smaller spots of jumping tuna, all had nice bird feeding flocks associated  ( mostly Elegant Terns, Pink-ft., and Sooty Shearwaters ). All though these, like the tuna, formed quickly, and dispersed just as quickly.
Partial list (offshore only)
Marbled Godwit   1
Red-necked Phalarope  20
Scripps's Murrelet   1
Craveri's Murrelet    14
murrelet sp.  4-6   ( likely SCMU, CRMU, could not eliminate GUMU )
Cassin's Auklet    1
Least Tern   10
Elegant Tern  175
Black Storm-Petrel   35
Ashy Storm-Petrel    3
Pink-footed Shearwater   15
Buller's Shearwater   1
Sooty Shearwater   60
Black-vented Shearwater   150
Brandt's Cormorant    2
Brown Pelican    50

Just a reminder that the Aug. 14th., and Sept. 19 th., Buena Vista Audubon pelagics trips are booked full and have standby lists. The Oct 3rd. is about half full.
I suggest acting soon if you wish to go on the October trip. See details at www.sandiegopelagics.com..then book directly at www.sdwhale.com or you can call Seaforth Landing at 619 224-3383. 
The Seaforth Landing also take standbys (within limits) for Aug. and Sept. trips.

Dave Povey
Dulzura


Links to The San Diego County Bird Atlas and subsequent records

Justyn Stahl
 

I've modified the footer/signature for all emails sent to San Diego Region Birding to include links to Unitt's "San Diego County Bird Atlas" and Lehman's "San Diego County Avian Records Database (2002–present)." Hopefully, all birders, both foreign and domestic, will now have these resources easily available. These links should show up at the bottom of this email, in the middle of the footer, and also be visible on other viewing platforms like Sialia and the ABA's Birding News.

Cheers,
Justyn Stahl (moderator)


Re: Local Steller's Jay ssp?

Philip Unitt
 

Dear Andrew,

 

You’re welcome! Subspecies stelleri from the Pacific Northwest has the blackish parts of the plumage a considerably deeper charcoal black than the slate gray of subspecies frontalis, which we have in southern California.

 

Good birding,

 

Philip Unitt

San Diego

 

From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of Andrew N
Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2021 5:30 PM
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Local Steller's Jay ssp?

 

Mystery solved, it's Frontalis! Thanks Bird Atlas (and Matt S. for pointing out the paragraph I apparently read right over.)

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com

 

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