Date   

Re: Saw-whet Owl?

Geoffrey L. Rogers
 

All,

 

I’d think daytime calling has a connection with breeding season territoriality. On 2 Feb 2011, although a bit before breeding season, a saw-whet was calling without elicitation at 1:00PM near Thunder Spring, Palomar Mountain State Park. Over quite a few years I have no other full daylight records.

 

Yes, the simple answer to Phil’s question seems “no.” Thanks to him for reporting this originally.

 

Geoffrey Rogers

San Diego, CA

 

From: Mary & Nick Freeman [mailto:mnfreeman@...]
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 12:12 AM
To: phil Pryde <PhilPinSD@...>
Cc: sandiegoregionbirding@groups.io; Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...>; Andie Jehl <dandiej@...>; Nathan French <nathanfrenchphotography@...>; Bruce Rideout <BRideout@...>; Gary Nunn <garybnunn@...>
Subject: Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Saw-whet Owl?

 

Hi Phil

 

In the 19 years surveying owls in the San Gabriel Mountains in lLA County, we have found one NSWO calling at around 5pm on a summer day.  Another NSWO we found called at 2:30pm one spring day.  It’s rare to hear one calling during the day in general.

 

Cheers!

 

Mary Freeman

Glendale, CA

 

On Sep 4, 2019, at 8:10 PM, phil Pryde <PhilPinSD@...> wrote:

 

Hi Geoff, Nathan, Bruce, Dan, Gary, and everyone, 

       Thanks for all of your interesting input.  Collectively all the input tells me there’s a simple answer to my original question, which was, “Did anyone else hear, or thought they heard, a Saw-whet Owl near the Crossbill site?” 

       The simple one-word answer seems to be, “no”. 

       So I’m happy to leave it at that, namely:   maybe  I heard a SWOW along the lower Agua Dulce trail. Or maybe not.  Or maybe someone will get a chance to tape the mystery call.  Or maybe the critter will send me a selfie. 

       At least I saw my FOS butter-butt, and a female selasphorus.   Whoopee. 

       Happy birding to all, and remember, you never saw a bird that didn’t see you first.  

Phil

 

 

 

 



On Sep 4, 2019, at 7:34 PM, Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...> wrote:

 

Yes, all 3 are up there: chipmunk, ground squirrel, and owl. 

 

 

Geoffrey Rogers

San Diego, CA

 

From: Bruce Rideout [mailto:BRideout@...] 
Sent: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 7:20 PM
To: phil Pryde <PhilPinSD@...>
Cc: Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...>
Subject: Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Saw-whet Owl?

 

Phil: It turned out the recording I was thinking of is a ground squirrel, which still sounds very similar, just slightly higher pitched. In my experience, these squirrel and chipmunk calls can carry quite a distance and pick up reverberations along the way that make them sound very un-chipmunk like. 

Bruce 


On Sep 4, 2019, at 9:39 AM, phil Pryde <PhilPinSD@...> wrote:

Hi Geoff,  

       My “one second” interval was entirely a spur of the moment estimate - the calls were very quickly repeated and could easily have been less than a second.  But I won’t rule out chipmunk, either, except to say that the call seemed to be coming from a fair distance away, and if it was a chipmunk he would have needed a good set of lungs.  Do you have a recording of whatever sp. of chipmunk would have been up there? 

      Best, Phil 

 




On Sep 4, 2019, at 9:27 AM, Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...> wrote:

 

Phil and all,

 

Not ruling saw-whet owl out but Birds of North America Online says calling speed is “about 2 per second.” I can vouch that an agitated saw-whet will briefly produce notes even faster. I think a speed nearing a second apart would be more in the Merriam’s Chipmunk range. 

 

Geoffrey Rogers

San Diego, CA

 

From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of phil Pryde
Sent: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 10:17 PM
To: sandiegoregionbirding@groups.io
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Saw-whet Owl?

 

This morning (Tues.), while looking for the mythological Red Crossbill (aka the toilet paper bird), I heard at a distance an incessant call that seemed to meet the requirements for a Saw-whet Owl.  The loud sharp notes, a whistled sup, sup, sup . . . , were about a second apart, and went on and on and on . . .   

 

The Bird Atlas notes that it calls “rarely even at midday”.  I’d estimate it was about 9:30 a.m. when I heard it while at the toilet paper site. That would be near the southernmost portion of its regular range.  

 

Just wondering, if any one else who was up there looking for easily spotted wildlife (such as Bigfoot, Jimmy Hoffa, and purported Crossbills) also heard anything they suspected of being a Saw-whet Owl? 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Saw-whet Owl?

Mary & Nick Freeman
 

Hi Phil

In the 19 years surveying owls in the San Gabriel Mountains in lLA County, we have found one NSWO calling at around 5pm on a summer day.  Another NSWO we found called at 2:30pm one spring day.  It’s rare to hear one calling during the day in general.

Cheers!

Mary Freeman
Glendale, CA

On Sep 4, 2019, at 8:10 PM, phil Pryde <PhilPinSD@...> wrote:

Hi Geoff, Nathan, Bruce, Dan, Gary, and everyone, 
       Thanks for all of your interesting input.  Collectively all the input tells me there’s a simple answer to my original question, which was, “Did anyone else hear, or thought they heard, a Saw-whet Owl near the Crossbill site?” 
       The simple one-word answer seems to be, “no”. 
       So I’m happy to leave it at that, namely:   maybe  I heard a SWOW along the lower Agua Dulce trail. Or maybe not.  Or maybe someone will get a chance to tape the mystery call.  Or maybe the critter will send me a selfie. 
       At least I saw my FOS butter-butt, and a female selasphorus.   Whoopee. 
       Happy birding to all, and remember, you never saw a bird that didn’t see you first.  
Phil





On Sep 4, 2019, at 7:34 PM, Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...> wrote:

Yes, all 3 are up there: chipmunk, ground squirrel, and owl. 
 
 
Geoffrey Rogers
San Diego, CA
 
From: Bruce Rideout [mailto:BRideout@...] 
Sent: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 7:20 PM
To: phil Pryde <PhilPinSD@...>
Cc: Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...>
Subject: Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Saw-whet Owl?
 

Phil: It turned out the recording I was thinking of is a ground squirrel, which still sounds very similar, just slightly higher pitched. In my experience, these squirrel and chipmunk calls can carry quite a distance and pick up reverberations along the way that make them sound very un-chipmunk like. 

Bruce 


On Sep 4, 2019, at 9:39 AM, phil Pryde <PhilPinSD@...> wrote:

Hi Geoff,  
       My “one second” interval was entirely a spur of the moment estimate - the calls were very quickly repeated and could easily have been less than a second.  But I won’t rule out chipmunk, either, except to say that the call seemed to be coming from a fair distance away, and if it was a chipmunk he would have needed a good set of lungs.  Do you have a recording of whatever sp. of chipmunk would have been up there? 
      Best, Phil 
 


On Sep 4, 2019, at 9:27 AM, Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...> wrote:
 
Phil and all,
 
Not ruling saw-whet owl out but Birds of North America Online says calling speed is “about 2 per second.” I can vouch that an agitated saw-whet will briefly produce notes even faster. I think a speed nearing a second apart would be more in the Merriam’s Chipmunk range. 
 
Geoffrey Rogers
San Diego, CA
 
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of phil Pryde
Sent: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 10:17 PM
To: sandiegoregionbirding@groups.io
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Saw-whet Owl?
 
This morning (Tues.), while looking for the mythological Red Crossbill (aka the toilet paper bird), I heard at a distance an incessant call that seemed to meet the requirements for a Saw-whet Owl.  The loud sharp notes, a whistled sup, sup, sup . . . , were about a second apart, and went on and on and on . . .   
 
The Bird Atlas notes that it calls “rarely even at midday”.  I’d estimate it was about 9:30 a.m. when I heard it while at the toilet paper site. That would be near the southernmost portion of its regular range.  
 
Just wondering, if any one else who was up there looking for easily spotted wildlife (such as Bigfoot, Jimmy Hoffa, and purported Crossbills) also heard anything they suspected of being a Saw-whet Owl? 
 
 
 




More booby news--and Zone-tailed Hawk

Philip Unitt
 

Dear friends,

 

If there are three Nazca Boobies in San Diego Bay now, there were probably four a few days ago, because on 26 August a subadult Nazca Booby was brought from North Island Naval Air Station to Project Wildlife, which transferred it to Sea World, which handles rehabilitation of local seabirds now. The bird died, but a picture sent me while it was still alive clearly showed the bill tinged with reddish. It was brought to me yesterday along with a carcass of a Red-footed Booby—of a bird that had been picked up on the San Diego Bay bait barge on 13 October 2018 and kept in captivity for some period that I don’t know. These boobies have gone through the standard necropsy procedure, so I will have to ask the vet staff at Sea World if they confirmed if either bird had swallowed a fishhook. In any case I’m planning reconstructive surgery on the Red-footed tomorrow.

 

In addition to the boobies, I also received yesterday, thanks to Linda King and Project Wildlife, a juvenile Zone-tailed Hawk found with a broken wing at the Tijuana River estuary on 31 August, picked up by Humane Law Enforcement.

 

We have also received two Yellow-crowned Night Herons this summer, one adult that came through Project Wildlife but unfortunately without an exact locality, and one recently fledged juvenile, which paid the price for depredating Snowy Plover chicks in the San Diego Bay salt works instead of the crabs it was supposed to be eating. Is the Yellow-crowned more numerous around San Diego than the Black-crowned yet?!?!

 

All these specimens have been or will be catalogued in the research collection of the San Diego Natural History Museum, serving as the core documentation of the rapid changes in our environment. I remember receiving our first San Diego County specimen of the Brown Booby in 1990 as if it were only yesterday….

 

Good birding,

 

Philip Unitt

San Diego

 

From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of David Povey
Sent: Friday, September 06, 2019 11:50 AM
To: sandiegoregionbirding@groups.io
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Searcher Pelagic

 

Sorry gang, my bad. All three adult boobies were Nazca Boobies. Seen as we returned to San Diego Bay about 8:30-8:40 a.m. this morning  (9-6-19). They were in flight on the west side of the bay between Shelter Is. and going towards the navy fuel pier. I'm not sure whether they're any photos as this was the end of a five day trip. Maybe 5-6 birders still active.

It would be interesting to see if any ships have come in form South America of Panama Canal over the last couple of days?

 

Other Highlights for the San Diego Co, portion of the trip were:

An Adult Nazca Booby near the Thirty Mile Bank on the Sept. 2

Several pairs of Craveri's Murrelets (3-4?) on the Thirty Mile.   9-2-19

Three Long-tailed Jaegers S.D.Trough and Thirty Mile Bank  9-2-19

Four Black Oystercatchers on Ballast Point  9-2-19

One Parastic Jaeger on 9-2 ,and two on on 9-6-19

One Pomarine Jaeger on 9-2

A large distant flying alcid . Likely a  Rhinoceros Auklet .  Nine Mile Bank around dawn   9-6-19. Certainly early, but we had one well seen on day two south of Santa Cruz Is. Not a Common Murre. some of which have been seen this summer.

 

Other sightings:

Pink-footed Shearwater    now our most abundant shearwater.

Sooty Shearwater

Black-vented Shearwater   one at Thirty Mile Bank.

Black Storm-Petrel   very small numbers

Leach's Storm-Petrel  chapmani   dang near as many as Blacks

Red-necked Phalarope

Red Phalarope very few

Sabine's Gull    good numbers all trip long, but not seen on the morning of the 6th.

Common Tern

Elegant Tern

 

No Least Storm-Petrel ( none seen anywhere for the five day trip), or Ashy Storm-Petrels, no other boobies, no tropicbird, or alcids, in local waters.

 

Two Byrde's W.hales just before the Thirty Mile Bank was only the second time I'd seen that  species in S.D. wasters.

 

Sorry again for the confusion on the S.D.Bay Nazca Boobies,

Dave Povey

Dulzura

 

 

 

 

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com

 


Continuing Red Crossbill; Hammond's Flycatcher; Agua Dulce Creek 6SEP2019

Tito Gonzalez
 

I observed a single RED CROSSBILL this morning at 10:10 AM the location about 200 yards upstream of the Y in the trail/road. It flew in calling from downstream direction and only stayed around for a minute or two.  Look at earlier posts for directions.  I also observed a nice HAMMOND’S FLYCATCHER around 12:20 PM about half way between Crossbill location and the trail back to pump house. More details and photos in following ebird report.

 

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59567131

 

Tito Gonzalez

Carlsbad, CA


Re: Shelter Island–Bait Docks, SD Bay – 3 adult NAZCA BOOBY, 06 Sep 2019

Jimmy McMorran
 

Hi Birders,
So happy the Searcher saw not just one but three Nazca Boobies at Shelter Island area. There was an adult or near adult on one of the bait barges with clearly orange bill as we passed by. This was at 4:00 a.m, and not the side or area were we got our bait, so didn’t attempt a photo. And didn’t think it was good idea to text  SD RBA at that time. Guess I should have at least posted, but was busy, then had no service when I had time. So at least one Nazca Booby was present a 4:00 a.m. on (9/6/2019). Will post later on some fun birds just south of the border. Just getting back into cell reception and seeing these booby posts, so thought I’d chime in real quick. 
Good Birding,
Jimmy McMorran
Leucadia, CA


On Sep 6, 2019, at 9:44 AM, Gary Nunn <garybnunn@...> wrote:

I am now hearing the three adult boobies in SD Bay are all NAZCA BOOBY.  Photographed and with orange bills.

Just acting as the messenger!

--
Gary Nunn
Pacific Beach

--
Good Birding,
Jimmy McMorran,
Leucadia, CA


Searcher Pelagic

David Povey
 

Sorry gang, my bad. All three adult boobies were Nazca Boobies. Seen as we returned to San Diego Bay about 8:30-8:40 a.m. this morning  (9-6-19). They were in flight on the west side of the bay between Shelter Is. and going towards the navy fuel pier. I'm not sure whether they're any photos as this was the end of a five day trip. Maybe 5-6 birders still active.
It would be interesting to see if any ships have come in form South America of Panama Canal over the last couple of days?

Other Highlights for the San Diego Co, portion of the trip were:
An Adult Nazca Booby near the Thirty Mile Bank on the Sept. 2
Several pairs of Craveri's Murrelets (3-4?) on the Thirty Mile.   9-2-19
Three Long-tailed Jaegers S.D.Trough and Thirty Mile Bank  9-2-19
Four Black Oystercatchers on Ballast Point  9-2-19
One Parastic Jaeger on 9-2 ,and two on on 9-6-19
One Pomarine Jaeger on 9-2
A large distant flying alcid . Likely a  Rhinoceros Auklet .  Nine Mile Bank around dawn   9-6-19. Certainly early, but we had one well seen on day two south of Santa Cruz Is. Not a Common Murre. some of which have been seen this summer.

Other sightings:
Pink-footed Shearwater    now our most abundant shearwater.
Sooty Shearwater
Black-vented Shearwater   one at Thirty Mile Bank.
Black Storm-Petrel   very small numbers
Leach's Storm-Petrel  chapmani   dang near as many as Blacks
Red-necked Phalarope
Red Phalarope very few
Sabine's Gull    good numbers all trip long, but not seen on the morning of the 6th.
Common Tern
Elegant Tern

No Least Storm-Petrel ( none seen anywhere for the five day trip), or Ashy Storm-Petrels, no other boobies, no tropicbird, or alcids, in local waters.

Two Byrde's W.hales just before the Thirty Mile Bank was only the second time I'd seen that  species in S.D. wasters.

Sorry again for the confusion on the S.D.Bay Nazca Boobies,
Dave Povey
Dulzura





Shelter Island–Bait Docks, SD Bay – 3 adult NAZCA BOOBY, 06 Sep 2019

Gary Nunn
 

I am now hearing the three adult boobies in SD Bay are all NAZCA BOOBY.  Photographed and with orange bills.

Just acting as the messenger!

--
Gary Nunn
Pacific Beach


Hooded Warbler in Wing St Canyon

Nathan French
 

Hooded Warbler continued this morning in Wing St Canyon around here. Seen by many other birders here:
(32.7447029, -117.2175859)

Nathan French
Hillcrest


Shelter Island–Bait Docks, SD Bay – 3 adult Masked Booby, 06 Sep 2019

Gary Nunn
 

Just heard from Dave Povey returning from sea onboard The Searcher and he reports three adult MASKED BOOBY in San Diego Bay entrance area between Shelter Island and the "Bait Docks".

Seen at 8:30 am.

--
Gary Nunn
Pacific Beach


Marbled godwits, sandpipers, and willets on Santa Clara Point

Jim Peugh
 

There were a few hundred Marbled godwits, a few hundred western and least sandpipers, and a lot of willets on the beach on the south side of the road leading out to Santa Clara Point in Mission Beach this afternoon.  That beach occasionally has large crowds of tired looking migrants. 


Baird's sandpiper Imperial Beach 5 Sept 2019

Robert Patton
 

Sorry for the late posting, but Lea Squires and I observed a relatively dull-colored (ie. more grayish-brown than reddish in head/breast color) juvenile Baird's sandpiper just after 11 am on 5 Sept foraging along the beach south from the south end of Seacoast Dr. and just SW of the south end of the barrier dune at Tijuana Estuary.
R. Patton
San Diego, CA


Bald Eagle and Black-throated Magpie-Jay

Pete Gordon
 

Good afternoon,

Sorry I didn't post this earlier.  

The Black-throated Magpie-Jay was in the tall Euc just west of the bridge by the El Arroyo Picnic Area at 6:15 am this morning.  He flew almost immediately toward the sculpture garden, and then back to the east over the girls scout camp.  Did not show again.

I returned about 10 am to try and find it and got good looks at a Bald Eagle circling high over the sculpture garden.

Pete Gordon
Foothill Ranch,  CA


Red Crossbills

Millie Basden
 

In case anyone is still interested in these birds and are discouraged by recent reports of them not being seen, we found 4 Red Crossbills at 10:45 am today (9/5 Thursday) at the spot on the trail marked by toilet paper (it survived the rain) as described in Lisa's post a few days ago. We also saw a female Williamson's Sapsucker, Hairy Woodpecker, several species of warblers, and other birds along the creek which has lots of water in it today.
Millie and Peter
Tierrasanta


RN Phalaropes at Lake Murray 9/5

James Pawlicki <jmpawli10@...>
 

There is currently (8:30 am) a flock of six juv Red-necked Phalaropes foraging on the water at Lake Murray in La Mesa, looking due northwest from the Kiowa Pt boat launch area.


Jim Pawlicki
La Mesa


next san elijo monthly bird count mon 9 sep

Robert Patton
 

The next San Elijo monthly bird count will be Monday 9 September.  Counts are conducted by volunteers on the second Monday of each month, rain or shine.  Please spread the word or join us if you can (no RSVP required).  Meet at 7:30 am at the north end of Rios Ave in Solana Beach (north from Lomas Santa Fe Dr, west of I-5) to divide into groups to cover different subareas.  A compilation generally follows around noon at the nature center on Manchester Ave (bring your own lunch).

Thanks,
R. Patton
San Diego, CA


Re: Saw-whet Owl?

phil Pryde
 

Hi Geoff, Nathan, Bruce, Dan, Gary, and everyone, 
       Thanks for all of your interesting input.  Collectively all the input tells me there’s a simple answer to my original question, which was, “Did anyone else hear, or thought they heard, a Saw-whet Owl near the Crossbill site?” 
       The simple one-word answer seems to be, “no”. 
       So I’m happy to leave it at that, namely:   maybe  I heard a SWOW along the lower Agua Dulce trail. Or maybe not.  Or maybe someone will get a chance to tape the mystery call.  Or maybe the critter will send me a selfie. 
       At least I saw my FOS butter-butt, and a female selasphorus.   Whoopee. 
       Happy birding to all, and remember, you never saw a bird that didn’t see you first.  
Phil





On Sep 4, 2019, at 7:34 PM, Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...> wrote:

Yes, all 3 are up there: chipmunk, ground squirrel, and owl. 
 
 
Geoffrey Rogers
San Diego, CA
 
From: Bruce Rideout [mailto:BRideout@...] 
Sent: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 7:20 PM
To: phil Pryde <PhilPinSD@...>
Cc: Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...>
Subject: Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Saw-whet Owl?
 

Phil: It turned out the recording I was thinking of is a ground squirrel, which still sounds very similar, just slightly higher pitched. In my experience, these squirrel and chipmunk calls can carry quite a distance and pick up reverberations along the way that make them sound very un-chipmunk like. 

Bruce 


On Sep 4, 2019, at 9:39 AM, phil Pryde <PhilPinSD@...> wrote:

Hi Geoff,  
       My “one second” interval was entirely a spur of the moment estimate - the calls were very quickly repeated and could easily have been less than a second.  But I won’t rule out chipmunk, either, except to say that the call seemed to be coming from a fair distance away, and if it was a chipmunk he would have needed a good set of lungs.  Do you have a recording of whatever sp. of chipmunk would have been up there? 
      Best, Phil 
 


On Sep 4, 2019, at 9:27 AM, Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...> wrote:
 
Phil and all,
 
Not ruling saw-whet owl out but Birds of North America Online says calling speed is “about 2 per second.” I can vouch that an agitated saw-whet will briefly produce notes even faster. I think a speed nearing a second apart would be more in the Merriam’s Chipmunk range. 
 
Geoffrey Rogers
San Diego, CA
 
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of phil Pryde
Sent: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 10:17 PM
To: sandiegoregionbirding@groups.io
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Saw-whet Owl?
 
This morning (Tues.), while looking for the mythological Red Crossbill (aka the toilet paper bird), I heard at a distance an incessant call that seemed to meet the requirements for a Saw-whet Owl.  The loud sharp notes, a whistled sup, sup, sup . . . , were about a second apart, and went on and on and on . . .   
 
The Bird Atlas notes that it calls “rarely even at midday”.  I’d estimate it was about 9:30 a.m. when I heard it while at the toilet paper site. That would be near the southernmost portion of its regular range.  
 
Just wondering, if any one else who was up there looking for easily spotted wildlife (such as Bigfoot, Jimmy Hoffa, and purported Crossbills) also heard anything they suspected of being a Saw-whet Owl? 
 
 
 



Re: Saw-whet Owl?

Geoffrey L. Rogers
 

Hi Phil,

A recording of Merriam's is at   http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/454  It is the most likely species here. The speed does pick up at the end but the quality is not as penetrating and a bit lower-pitched than a saw-whet. I agree it would not carry as well as a saw-whet's call. 

At https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347276800401 there is a paper in the journal Animal Behavior on chipmunk calls but it requires $35 more than I care to spend. 

Geoff


On Wed, Sep 4, 2019 at 9:39 AM phil Pryde <philpinsd@...> wrote:
Hi Geoff, 
       My “one second” interval was entirely a spur of the moment estimate - the calls were very quickly repeated and could easily have been less than a second.  But I won’t rule out chipmunk, either, except to say that the call seemed to be coming from a fair distance away, and if it was a chipmunk he would have needed a good set of lungs.  Do you have a recording of whatever sp. of chipmunk would have been up there? 
      Best, Phil 


On Sep 4, 2019, at 9:27 AM, Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...> wrote:

Phil and all,
 
Not ruling saw-whet owl out but Birds of North America Online says calling speed is “about 2 per second.” I can vouch that an agitated saw-whet will briefly produce notes even faster. I think a speed nearing a second apart would be more in the Merriam’s Chipmunk range. 
 
Geoffrey Rogers
San Diego, CA
 
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of phil Pryde
Sent: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 10:17 PM
To: sandiegoregionbirding@groups.io
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Saw-whet Owl?
 
This morning (Tues.), while looking for the mythological Red Crossbill (aka the toilet paper bird), I heard at a distance an incessant call that seemed to meet the requirements for a Saw-whet Owl.  The loud sharp notes, a whistled sup, sup, sup . . . , were about a second apart, and went on and on and on . . .   
 
The Bird Atlas notes that it calls “rarely even at midday”.  I’d estimate it was about 9:30 a.m. when I heard it while at the toilet paper site. That would be near the southernmost portion of its regular range.  
 
Just wondering, if any one else who was up there looking for easily spotted wildlife (such as Bigfoot, Jimmy Hoffa, and purported Crossbills) also heard anything they suspected of being a Saw-whet Owl? 
 



Re: Saw-whet Owl?

phil Pryde
 

Hi Geoff, 
       My “one second” interval was entirely a spur of the moment estimate - the calls were very quickly repeated and could easily have been less than a second.  But I won’t rule out chipmunk, either, except to say that the call seemed to be coming from a fair distance away, and if it was a chipmunk he would have needed a good set of lungs.  Do you have a recording of whatever sp. of chipmunk would have been up there? 
      Best, Phil 


On Sep 4, 2019, at 9:27 AM, Geoff Rogers <rogersgl1952@...> wrote:

Phil and all,
 
Not ruling saw-whet owl out but Birds of North America Online says calling speed is “about 2 per second.” I can vouch that an agitated saw-whet will briefly produce notes even faster. I think a speed nearing a second apart would be more in the Merriam’s Chipmunk range. 
 
Geoffrey Rogers
San Diego, CA
 
From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of phil Pryde
Sent: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 10:17 PM
To: sandiegoregionbirding@groups.io
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Saw-whet Owl?
 
This morning (Tues.), while looking for the mythological Red Crossbill (aka the toilet paper bird), I heard at a distance an incessant call that seemed to meet the requirements for a Saw-whet Owl.  The loud sharp notes, a whistled sup, sup, sup . . . , were about a second apart, and went on and on and on . . .   
 
The Bird Atlas notes that it calls “rarely even at midday”.  I’d estimate it was about 9:30 a.m. when I heard it while at the toilet paper site. That would be near the southernmost portion of its regular range.  
 
Just wondering, if any one else who was up there looking for easily spotted wildlife (such as Bigfoot, Jimmy Hoffa, and purported Crossbills) also heard anything they suspected of being a Saw-whet Owl? 
 



Re: Saw-whet Owl?

Geoffrey L. Rogers
 

Phil and all,

 

Not ruling saw-whet owl out but Birds of North America Online says calling speed is “about 2 per second.” I can vouch that an agitated saw-whet will briefly produce notes even faster. I think a speed nearing a second apart would be more in the Merriam’s Chipmunk range.

 

Geoffrey Rogers

San Diego, CA

 

From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of phil Pryde
Sent: Tuesday, September 3, 2019 10:17 PM
To: sandiegoregionbirding@groups.io
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] Saw-whet Owl?

 

This morning (Tues.), while looking for the mythological Red Crossbill (aka the toilet paper bird), I heard at a distance an incessant call that seemed to meet the requirements for a Saw-whet Owl.  The loud sharp notes, a whistled sup, sup, sup . . . , were about a second apart, and went on and on and on . . .   

 

The Bird Atlas notes that it calls “rarely even at midday”.  I’d estimate it was about 9:30 a.m. when I heard it while at the toilet paper site. That would be near the southernmost portion of its regular range.  

 

Just wondering, if any one else who was up there looking for easily spotted wildlife (such as Bigfoot, Jimmy Hoffa, and purported Crossbills) also heard anything they suspected of being a Saw-whet Owl? 

 


Re: Saw-whet Owl?

phil Pryde
 

     Sorry about the ambiguity in my email of last evening - I was mainly reaching out to those who had already gone to “the spot” to look for the Crossbills, which is about 1 1/2 miles down the Agua Dulce trail, as described in Gary Nunn’s email of Sept. 2, and other earlier reports.  
     For those who haven’t tried to see the Crossbills, the joke was that some considerate person had tied a string of (yes, unused) toilet paper to a fallen branch to mark the spot where the Crossibills had been most reliably seen (except yesterday).  I didn’t see a Bigfoot, either.  
    Phil 


On Sep 3, 2019, at 10:19 PM, KRIS MCMILLAN <krismcmillan@...> wrote:

You’re a million steps ahead of me, but, I’m wondering WHERE were you when you heard all these magical mysterious sounds?


On Sep 3, 2019, at 10:16 PM, phil Pryde <PhilPinSD@...> wrote:

This morning (Tues.), while looking for the mythological Red Crossbill (aka the toilet paper bird), I heard at a distance an incessant call that seemed to meet the requirements for a Saw-whet Owl.  The loud sharp notes, a whistled sup, sup, sup . . . , were about a second apart, and went on and on and on . . .   

The Bird Atlas notes that it calls “rarely even at midday”.  I’d estimate it was about 9:30 a.m. when I heard it while at the toilet paper site. That would be near the southernmost portion of its regular range.  
 
Just wondering, if any one else who was up there looking for easily spotted wildlife (such as Bigfoot, Jimmy Hoffa, and purported Crossbills) also heard anything they suspected of being a Saw-whet Owl?