Date   
Re: El Camino Memorial Park - Blackpoll Warbler, Sep 21, 2018

Tito Gonzalez
 

BLACKPOLL WARBLER found by Mike Nelson continued between 3:30 and 4:30 pm today (21SEP 2018) at same location. It was seen in various trees and bushes but seemed to favor feeding in large sycamore next to water between the two ponds.

Tito Gonzalez
Carlsbad, CA

Re: El Camino Memorial Park - Blackpoll Warbler, Sep 21, 2018

Larry Edwards
 

Bird still continuing at the park at 7:00 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 22. First spotted on the fence above the water channel between the two ponds, then it flew into the reeds in the channel. When I last saw it, it was moving westward, toward the sycamore mentioned by Tito Gonzalez. Photos posted on eBird: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48666289

Black-and-white Warbler Villa La Jolla Park

Nicole Desnoyers
 

This morning 9/22/18 there was a Black-and-white Warbler in the north-east corner of Villa La Jolla Park. The park was generally birdy, but nothing else of note. 

Nicole Desnoyers/Justyn Stahl
North Park

Broad-winged Hawk at Cabrillo 9/22

James Pawlicki
 

A lightly marked juvenile Broad-winged Hawk went over Cabrillo NM about 15 mins ago (1100) initially heading SW towards lighthouse and then turning back N. Last seen heading due NNE towards east side of FRNC.


Jim Pawlicki
La Mesa, CA

Tennessee Warbler at Kimball Park and various continuing birds

Ryan Andrews
 

I had a Tennessee Warbler at Kimball Park in National City this morning (9/22/18). It was in the NW corner of the park, in a large tipu tree (the largest tipu in the area) near the bathroom. There was around five Yellow Warblers in the same tree which made keeping track of the Tennessee rather tough -- I didn't get any meaningful pictures. The park overall was quite birdy. I'm surprised this park isn't birded more as it's one of the larger urban parks, has good habitat, and has had a few notable birds in the past. Anyway, definitely a park worth poking around in if anybody wants to burn some time looking for something new.

In the Tijuana River Valley, the Northern Waterthrush continued at the stick pond and the female American Redstart continued at the Bird and Butterfly Garden. I had no ground-doves while I was there. 

The Blackpoll Warbler at El Camino Memorial Park was easy to see at about 10am. Right where others have reported it.

Ryan Andrews
Valley Center

Various locs – Tropical Kingbirds, Dickcissel, Sep 21–22, 2018

Gary Nunn
 

This morning Sep 22, 2018 at Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery not too birdy.  A showy TROPICAL KINGBIRD near the main entrance in Ficus tree tops and tallest palm tree tops. It was associating with one Cassin's Kingbird. No vocalizations heard but large billed individual. If anyone hears it call please let us know.  Also in the southwest corner a cooperative "Least" Bell's Vireo showed itself.

Yesterday September 21, 2018 I received nice photos, and an audio recording, of a TROPICAL KINGBIRD in Chula Vista, found and documented by Susan Yamagata. It was on utility lines near the junction of 1st Ave. and Sierra Way, a block from the golf course on L St.

Also reported today September 22, 2018 a DICKCISSEL on Fiesta Island, Mission Bay in the large eucalyptus trees in center of dog run area. Last heard calling, and flying off west, by finder David Holway at 0910.

--
Gary Nunn
you can find me on twitter,
@garybnunn

Townsend’s Solitaire yes. Clark’s Nutcrackers no. Mt Laguna Saturday 9/22

terry hurst
 

Hello all,

I was there from around 7:00 to 11:45 and did not see or hear the previous reported Clark’s Nutcrackers. Maybe others had better luck then I did. I was with Barbara Carlson when we both saw the Townsend’s Solitaire. It was found on the west side of the trail where the trail meets the road north of the pump house.

Terry Hurst

additional details regarding today's Dickcissel

David Holway
 

Hi all,

I wanted to provide some additional details about the Dickcissel seen today (22 Sep 2018) at Fiesta Island. I was first alerted to the presence of this bird by its distinctive call note. I was standing under the Eucalyptus trees in the central part of the dog run, and heard the Dickcissel call about five times starting at 910 am. I know this call from birding in Texas in migration; flight calls on Xeno-Canto sound exactly like what I heard. I moved out from under the trees to the west to see if I could see the bird. I looked for about a minute before spotting it on an exposed branch near the top of the tree. Unfortunately I was able to get a only a brief, side-view look at the Dickcissel before it took flight. I thus was unable to obtain a photo. This bird appeared fairly bright. I did see that it had a yellowish upper breast and a rusty shoulder.

 

I watched the Dickcissel fly west but soon lost sight of it. I spent about 30 min walking around the northern part of the dog run to see if I could relocate it but did not. Hopefully it will come back.

 

I saw little else of note this morning out there. There were small numbers of Savannah Sparrows and Horned Larks.

 

Cheers,

 

David

  

Zone-tailed Hawks San Diego Safari Park

Nathan French
 


I went to a wedding at San Diego Safari Park Saturday (9/22) afternoon, some quick birding on the way revealed two Zone-tailed Hawks (one adult, one immature) flying in a group of TUVU at about 4:20 PM. Pics on checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48685338

 
Nathan French Photography

Chestnut-sided Warbler, Santee Lakes

Jeremiah Stock
 

Birded Santee Lakes Sunday morning 9/23/18.  A Chestnut-sided Warbler was seen on the east side of the campground at about the latitude of the northern end of Lake 6.  The bird had no chestnut coloring, so likely a first Fall female.  All gray and white below with no patterns or markings, white undertail coverts, 2 prominent wingbars with yellowish/greenish tint, faint eye ring and green upperparts. Posed a few times with tail up and wings down.  Heard a few chips, somewhat like a Yellow Warbler.  The bird was first seen in a mulberry tree that overhangs the main road on the east side of the park and worked its way into the campground to the west.  Also saw a Least Bittern on an island in Lake 5.

Jeremiah Stock
Santee, CA
jscls@...

Marcy Park Summer Tanager

Jim Roberts GMAIL
 

This morning (9/23/18) at 9:30, an adult male SUMMER TANAGER was seen along the south (eastern portion) fence line of Marcy Park.

It was also south of the fence in the north eastern corner of Mission Bay Montessori School.

This may be a continuing bird that I have missed for the last week, though I searched for it repeatedly.

Or it could be a new bird.

 

                         Jim Roberts

                        University City

 

                                 

Clay-Colored Sparrow at FRNC

Tuck Russell
 

Seen at 10a in a pine at the western dip. Likely a continuing bird from last week. One usable photo. 

Tuck Russell
Hillcrest

Vesper sparrow at Sweetwater Reservoir

Kat Wendel
 

This morning 9.23.18 I saw a VESPER SPARROW in parking lot of Sweetwater Reservoir. Additionally, I saw a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE along lakeshore mixed in with a flock of peeps.
--
Kat Wendel
in La Mesa

News from San Felipe Valley: Broad-winged Hawk, Tropical Kingbird, Summer Tanagers...

Philip Unitt
 

Dear friends,

 

Last week, from 17 to 21 September, our team from the San Diego Natural History Museum surveyed the riparian oasis in San Felipe Valley, about midway between the pass along Highway S2 and Scissors Crossing. The area became part of the San Felipe Wildlife Area several years ago, and our study was sponsored by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Last week’s visit followed one in July 2017 and another in March of this year.

 

On Wednesday 19 September, Lea Squires, Christine Beck, and I saw an adult Broad-winged Hawk. It flew out of the riparian woodland and circled over us for about a minute, showing a tail boldly banded with black and white, pale underwings with primaries and trailing edge sharply tipped with black, a head rather uniformly dark brown, breast mottled brown, sides barred brown, belly whitish, and upperparts gray. Then it headed down the valley.

 

The next day, I was with Marcus Hubbell and Stéphane Vernhet when we heard a high-pitched twittering from the opposite side of the creek, out of sight. I said, “if anything, that sounds like a Tropical Kingbird!” The bird kept calling but moving northwest up the valley—it was still calling when we met up with Lea Squires. I found a spot with a break in the trees where we could look across the creek to some mesquites on the opposite side. And there it was sitting atop one of the mesquites, a kingbird with a pale gray head, yellow belly, and dark but not black tail. At a distance of ~150 m the identification still relied more on the voice than on the plumage. Then the bird flew high into the air and headed out of sight to the northwest up the valley. The next morning, a bit farther upstream, I thought I heard the characteristic twittering call once in the distance. Then when I met up with Lori Hargrove a couple of hours later, she related that she had just seen the Tropical Kingbird very well right along Highway S2, noting the extensively bright yellow underparts, green back, large bill, etc. I don’t know of any previous records of the Tropical Kingbird far inland in San Diego County, but San Felipe Valley leads up to the lowest pass over the county’s mountains. So it’s a reasonable place to find a Tropical Kingbird as it makes the crossing that accounts for the species regularly reaching the coast. San Felipe Valley is well known as a corridor for spring migrants heading northwest, and seeing its use in fall was a reason for choosing a survey in mid-September. Several Vaux’s Swifts and Barn Swallows—as well as the Broad-winged Hawk—were following the route toward the southeast, but we hadn’t anticipated seeing it used as a corridor to the northwest in fall by the Tropical Kingbird.

 

Early fall arrivals were a Hermit Thrush on 18 Sep and a junco on 19 Sep. One Nashville Warbler had the throat white, the belly extensively white, and the back so gray it might have been mistaken for a Virginia’s Warbler, but the rump was the same green as in a Nashville. Wilson’s Warbler was by far the dominant species among the common migrants. An Acorn Woodpecker on 19 Sep was about two miles below the lowest oak trees. The Nuttall’s and Ladder-backed Woodpeckers meet here: there are several Nuttall’s in the riparian woodland along the creek, Ladder-backed in the scrub on the adjacent southwest-facing slope and occasionally crossing the creek.

 

The area has become an important site for breeding riparian birds—Lori counted up to 33 Bell’s Vireos along a mile and a quarter of creek on 25 July 2017—far greater than from 2003 to 2008 when she and Paul Jorgensen covered the area during our study of the effects of the fires. Last week, one Bell’s Vireo was still present and singing sporadically up until 20 September, and at least two Yellow-breasted Chats were still there on 21 September. Summer Tanagers were still present up until our departure on the 21st with a minimum of three individuals, one female and two adult males. On the morning of the 18th, one of the males was even singing. The museum’s early collections from the Colorado River attest to the population of the Summer Tanager there remaining into late September. But I don’t think any previous observations have confirmed that our recently established population in San Diego County remains similarly late. Also, the White-winged Dove is now resident in San Felipe Valley, as we saw it on all three visits, though no more than one bird per day last week.

 

Our mammal results include three species of bats—the western pipistrelle, California myotis, and Townsend’s big-eared bat—captured by Drew Stokes in two evenings of netting. Drew also saw a mountain lion!

 

The only downside to the week were the bug bites Lea and I got—possibly from two species of mites, including bites that look like chiggers. Lea got a bad case of chiggers in Camp Pendleton a couple of years ago. In my whole life I had never heard of chiggers in San Diego County. Is dealing with chiggers another price we must now pay for the warming climate?

 

Thanks to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife for sponsoring our study and Hans Sin for coordinating it.

 

Good birding,

 

Philip Unitt

San Diego

Re: News from San Felipe Valley: Broad-winged Hawk, Tropical Kingbird, Summer Tanagers...

Geoffrey L. Rogers
 

After decades of California Gnatcatcher surveys in southern California I’ve never had a chigger incident. I’ve removed multitudes of ticks but no chiggers. As Phil implies, they must be a recent arrival.

 

Geoffrey Rogers

San Diego, CA

 

From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of Philip Unitt
Sent: Sunday, September 23, 2018 4:03 PM
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io
Cc: 'Lori Hargrove'
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] News from San Felipe Valley: Broad-winged Hawk, Tropical Kingbird, Summer Tanagers...

 

Dear friends,

 

Last week, from 17 to 21 September, our team from the San Diego Natural History Museum surveyed the riparian oasis in San Felipe Valley, about midway between the pass along Highway S2 and Scissors Crossing. The area became part of the San Felipe Wildlife Area several years ago, and our study was sponsored by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Last week’s visit followed one in July 2017 and another in March of this year.

 

On Wednesday 19 September, Lea Squires, Christine Beck, and I saw an adult Broad-winged Hawk. It flew out of the riparian woodland and circled over us for about a minute, showing a tail boldly banded with black and white, pale underwings with primaries and trailing edge sharply tipped with black, a head rather uniformly dark brown, breast mottled brown, sides barred brown, belly whitish, and upperparts gray. Then it headed down the valley.

 

The next day, I was with Marcus Hubbell and Stéphane Vernhet when we heard a high-pitched twittering from the opposite side of the creek, out of sight. I said, “if anything, that sounds like a Tropical Kingbird!” The bird kept calling but moving northwest up the valley—it was still calling when we met up with Lea Squires. I found a spot with a break in the trees where we could look across the creek to some mesquites on the opposite side. And there it was sitting atop one of the mesquites, a kingbird with a pale gray head, yellow belly, and dark but not black tail. At a distance of ~150 m the identification still relied more on the voice than on the plumage. Then the bird flew high into the air and headed out of sight to the northwest up the valley. The next morning, a bit farther upstream, I thought I heard the characteristic twittering call once in the distance. Then when I met up with Lori Hargrove a couple of hours later, she related that she had just seen the Tropical Kingbird very well right along Highway S2, noting the extensively bright yellow underparts, green back, large bill, etc. I don’t know of any previous records of the Tropical Kingbird far inland in San Diego County, but San Felipe Valley leads up to the lowest pass over the county’s mountains. So it’s a reasonable place to find a Tropical Kingbird as it makes the crossing that accounts for the species regularly reaching the coast. San Felipe Valley is well known as a corridor for spring migrants heading northwest, and seeing its use in fall was a reason for choosing a survey in mid-September. Several Vaux’s Swifts and Barn Swallows—as well as the Broad-winged Hawk—were following the route toward the southeast, but we hadn’t anticipated seeing it used as a corridor to the northwest in fall by the Tropical Kingbird.

 

Early fall arrivals were a Hermit Thrush on 18 Sep and a junco on 19 Sep. One Nashville Warbler had the throat white, the belly extensively white, and the back so gray it might have been mistaken for a Virginia’s Warbler, but the rump was the same green as in a Nashville. Wilson’s Warbler was by far the dominant species among the common migrants. An Acorn Woodpecker on 19 Sep was about two miles below the lowest oak trees. The Nuttall’s and Ladder-backed Woodpeckers meet here: there are several Nuttall’s in the riparian woodland along the creek, Ladder-backed in the scrub on the adjacent southwest-facing slope and occasionally crossing the creek.

 

The area has become an important site for breeding riparian birds—Lori counted up to 33 Bell’s Vireos along a mile and a quarter of creek on 25 July 2017—far greater than from 2003 to 2008 when she and Paul Jorgensen covered the area during our study of the effects of the fires. Last week, one Bell’s Vireo was still present and singing sporadically up until 20 September, and at least two Yellow-breasted Chats were still there on 21 September. Summer Tanagers were still present up until our departure on the 21st with a minimum of three individuals, one female and two adult males. On the morning of the 18th, one of the males was even singing. The museum’s early collections from the Colorado River attest to the population of the Summer Tanager there remaining into late September. But I don’t think any previous observations have confirmed that our recently established population in San Diego County remains similarly late. Also, the White-winged Dove is now resident in San Felipe Valley, as we saw it on all three visits, though no more than one bird per day last week.

 

Our mammal results include three species of bats—the western pipistrelle, California myotis, and Townsend’s big-eared bat—captured by Drew Stokes in two evenings of netting. Drew also saw a mountain lion!

 

The only downside to the week were the bug bites Lea and I got—possibly from two species of mites, including bites that look like chiggers. Lea got a bad case of chiggers in Camp Pendleton a couple of years ago. In my whole life I had never heard of chiggers in San Diego County. Is dealing with chiggers another price we must now pay for the warming climate?

 

Thanks to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife for sponsoring our study and Hans Sin for coordinating it.

 

Good birding,

 

Philip Unitt

San Diego

Re: News from San Felipe Valley: Broad-winged Hawk, Tropical Kingbird, Summer Tanagers...

Brennan Mulrooney
 

I’ve been plagued by chiggers here ever since I moved back from FL in 2008. I also got them at the Salton Sea in 1999. It seems to me that I’m more prone to getting them than most people for some reason though. 

Brennan Mulrooney 
Santee, CA


On Sep 23, 2018, at 4:56 PM, Geoffrey Rogers <rogersgl1952@...> wrote:

After decades of California Gnatcatcher surveys in southern California I’ve never had a chigger incident. I’ve removed multitudes of ticks but no chiggers. As Phil implies, they must be a recent arrival.

 

Geoffrey Rogers

San Diego, CA

 

From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of Philip Unitt
Sent: Sunday, September 23, 2018 4:03 PM
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io
Cc: 'Lori Hargrove'
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] News from San Felipe Valley: Broad-winged Hawk, Tropical Kingbird, Summer Tanagers...

 

Dear friends,

 

Last week, from 17 to 21 September, our team from the San Diego Natural History Museum surveyed the riparian oasis in San Felipe Valley, about midway between the pass along Highway S2 and Scissors Crossing. The area became part of the San Felipe Wildlife Area several years ago, and our study was sponsored by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Last week’s visit followed one in July 2017 and another in March of this year.

 

On Wednesday 19 September, Lea Squires, Christine Beck, and I saw an adult Broad-winged Hawk. It flew out of the riparian woodland and circled over us for about a minute, showing a tail boldly banded with black and white, pale underwings with primaries and trailing edge sharply tipped with black, a head rather uniformly dark brown, breast mottled brown, sides barred brown, belly whitish, and upperparts gray. Then it headed down the valley.

 

The next day, I was with Marcus Hubbell and Stéphane Vernhet when we heard a high-pitched twittering from the opposite side of the creek, out of sight. I said, “if anything, that sounds like a Tropical Kingbird!” The bird kept calling but moving northwest up the valley—it was still calling when we met up with Lea Squires. I found a spot with a break in the trees where we could look across the creek to some mesquites on the opposite side. And there it was sitting atop one of the mesquites, a kingbird with a pale gray head, yellow belly, and dark but not black tail. At a distance of ~150 m the identification still relied more on the voice than on the plumage. Then the bird flew high into the air and headed out of sight to the northwest up the valley. The next morning, a bit farther upstream, I thought I heard the characteristic twittering call once in the distance. Then when I met up with Lori Hargrove a couple of hours later, she related that she had just seen the Tropical Kingbird very well right along Highway S2, noting the extensively bright yellow underparts, green back, large bill, etc. I don’t know of any previous records of the Tropical Kingbird far inland in San Diego County, but San Felipe Valley leads up to the lowest pass over the county’s mountains. So it’s a reasonable place to find a Tropical Kingbird as it makes the crossing that accounts for the species regularly reaching the coast. San Felipe Valley is well known as a corridor for spring migrants heading northwest, and seeing its use in fall was a reason for choosing a survey in mid-September. Several Vaux’s Swifts and Barn Swallows—as well as the Broad-winged Hawk—were following the route toward the southeast, but we hadn’t anticipated seeing it used as a corridor to the northwest in fall by the Tropical Kingbird.

 

Early fall arrivals were a Hermit Thrush on 18 Sep and a junco on 19 Sep. One Nashville Warbler had the throat white, the belly extensively white, and the back so gray it might have been mistaken for a Virginia’s Warbler, but the rump was the same green as in a Nashville. Wilson’s Warbler was by far the dominant species among the common migrants. An Acorn Woodpecker on 19 Sep was about two miles below the lowest oak trees. The Nuttall’s and Ladder-backed Woodpeckers meet here: there are several Nuttall’s in the riparian woodland along the creek, Ladder-backed in the scrub on the adjacent southwest-facing slope and occasionally crossing the creek.

 

The area has become an important site for breeding riparian birds—Lori counted up to 33 Bell’s Vireos along a mile and a quarter of creek on 25 July 2017—far greater than from 2003 to 2008 when she and Paul Jorgensen covered the area during our study of the effects of the fires. Last week, one Bell’s Vireo was still present and singing sporadically up until 20 September, and at least two Yellow-breasted Chats were still there on 21 September. Summer Tanagers were still present up until our departure on the 21st with a minimum of three individuals, one female and two adult males. On the morning of the 18th, one of the males was even singing. The museum’s early collections from the Colorado River attest to the population of the Summer Tanager there remaining into late September. But I don’t think any previous observations have confirmed that our recently established population in San Diego County remains similarly late. Also, the White-winged Dove is now resident in San Felipe Valley, as we saw it on all three visits, though no more than one bird per day last week.

 

Our mammal results include three species of bats—the western pipistrelle, California myotis, and Townsend’s big-eared bat—captured by Drew Stokes in two evenings of netting. Drew also saw a mountain lion!

 

The only downside to the week were the bug bites Lea and I got—possibly from two species of mites, including bites that look like chiggers. Lea got a bad case of chiggers in Camp Pendleton a couple of years ago. In my whole life I had never heard of chiggers in San Diego County. Is dealing with chiggers another price we must now pay for the warming climate?

 

Thanks to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife for sponsoring our study and Hans Sin for coordinating it.

 

Good birding,

 

Philip Unitt

San Diego


--
Brennan Mulrooney
Santee, CA

Re: News from San Felipe Valley: Broad-winged Hawk, Tropical Kingbird, Summer Tanagers...

Geoffrey L. Rogers
 

I should have added that I walked through a lot of grassland to get to and from gnatcatcher habitat. I also did other surveys in grasslands, enough that seasonal allergies (runny nose and watering eyes) were triggered at least once almost every spring. No one I worked with ever mentioned them. Not extremely helpful but worth considering is the distribution account in Wikipedia, “In the United States, they are found mostly in the southeast, the south, and the Midwest. They are not present, or barely found, in far northern areas, high mountains, and deserts.” A few highly localized populations of chiggers, here by natural or unnatural means, combined with sensitivity of certain people may be what we’re looking at.

 

Geoffrey Rogers

San Diego, CA

 

From: Charles Jackson [mailto:socalbirder8@...]
Sent: Sunday, September 23, 2018 5:58 PM
To: Brennan Mulrooney
Cc: Geoffrey Rogers; SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] News from San Felipe Valley: Broad-winged Hawk, Tropical Kingbird, Summer Tanagers...

 

I got two in my yard in the spring this year. From cleaning up leaf litter. Told my neighbor to watch out and later she said she’d got one. When I lived back east (Virginia, Marland) I practically lived in the woods. Never got one then. Now out west I’ve had two incidents.

 

Charles

San Diego

📲


On Sep 23, 2018, at 17:11, Brennan Mulrooney <Frozentoze@...> wrote:

I’ve been plagued by chiggers here ever since I moved back from FL in 2008. I also got them at the Salton Sea in 1999. It seems to me that I’m more prone to getting them than most people for some reason though. 

 

Brennan Mulrooney 

Santee, CA


On Sep 23, 2018, at 4:56 PM, Geoffrey Rogers <rogersgl1952@...> wrote:

After decades of California Gnatcatcher surveys in southern California I’ve never had a chigger incident. I’ve removed multitudes of ticks but no chiggers. As Phil implies, they must be a recent arrival.

 

Geoffrey Rogers

San Diego, CA

 

From: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io [mailto:SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io] On Behalf Of Philip Unitt
Sent: Sunday, September 23, 2018 4:03 PM
To: SanDiegoRegionBirding@groups.io
Cc: 'Lori Hargrove'
Subject: [SanDiegoRegionBirding] News from San Felipe Valley: Broad-winged Hawk, Tropical Kingbird, Summer Tanagers...

 

Dear friends,

 

Last week, from 17 to 21 September, our team from the San Diego Natural History Museum surveyed the riparian oasis in San Felipe Valley, about midway between the pass along Highway S2 and Scissors Crossing. The area became part of the San Felipe Wildlife Area several years ago, and our study was sponsored by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Last week’s visit followed one in July 2017 and another in March of this year.

 

On Wednesday 19 September, Lea Squires, Christine Beck, and I saw an adult Broad-winged Hawk. It flew out of the riparian woodland and circled over us for about a minute, showing a tail boldly banded with black and white, pale underwings with primaries and trailing edge sharply tipped with black, a head rather uniformly dark brown, breast mottled brown, sides barred brown, belly whitish, and upperparts gray. Then it headed down the valley.

 

The next day, I was with Marcus Hubbell and Stéphane Vernhet when we heard a high-pitched twittering from the opposite side of the creek, out of sight. I said, “if anything, that sounds like a Tropical Kingbird!” The bird kept calling but moving northwest up the valley—it was still calling when we met up with Lea Squires. I found a spot with a break in the trees where we could look across the creek to some mesquites on the opposite side. And there it was sitting atop one of the mesquites, a kingbird with a pale gray head, yellow belly, and dark but not black tail. At a distance of ~150 m the identification still relied more on the voice than on the plumage. Then the bird flew high into the air and headed out of sight to the northwest up the valley. The next morning, a bit farther upstream, I thought I heard the characteristic twittering call once in the distance. Then when I met up with Lori Hargrove a couple of hours later, she related that she had just seen the Tropical Kingbird very well right along Highway S2, noting the extensively bright yellow underparts, green back, large bill, etc. I don’t know of any previous records of the Tropical Kingbird far inland in San Diego County, but San Felipe Valley leads up to the lowest pass over the county’s mountains. So it’s a reasonable place to find a Tropical Kingbird as it makes the crossing that accounts for the species regularly reaching the coast. San Felipe Valley is well known as a corridor for spring migrants heading northwest, and seeing its use in fall was a reason for choosing a survey in mid-September. Several Vaux’s Swifts and Barn Swallows—as well as the Broad-winged Hawk—were following the route toward the southeast, but we hadn’t anticipated seeing it used as a corridor to the northwest in fall by the Tropical Kingbird.

 

Early fall arrivals were a Hermit Thrush on 18 Sep and a junco on 19 Sep. One Nashville Warbler had the throat white, the belly extensively white, and the back so gray it might have been mistaken for a Virginia’s Warbler, but the rump was the same green as in a Nashville. Wilson’s Warbler was by far the dominant species among the common migrants. An Acorn Woodpecker on 19 Sep was about two miles below the lowest oak trees. The Nuttall’s and Ladder-backed Woodpeckers meet here: there are several Nuttall’s in the riparian woodland along the creek, Ladder-backed in the scrub on the adjacent southwest-facing slope and occasionally crossing the creek.

 

The area has become an important site for breeding riparian birds—Lori counted up to 33 Bell’s Vireos along a mile and a quarter of creek on 25 July 2017—far greater than from 2003 to 2008 when she and Paul Jorgensen covered the area during our study of the effects of the fires. Last week, one Bell’s Vireo was still present and singing sporadically up until 20 September, and at least two Yellow-breasted Chats were still there on 21 September. Summer Tanagers were still present up until our departure on the 21st with a minimum of three individuals, one female and two adult males. On the morning of the 18th, one of the males was even singing. The museum’s early collections from the Colorado River attest to the population of the Summer Tanager there remaining into late September. But I don’t think any previous observations have confirmed that our recently established population in San Diego County remains similarly late. Also, the White-winged Dove is now resident in San Felipe Valley, as we saw it on all three visits, though no more than one bird per day last week.

 

Our mammal results include three species of bats—the western pipistrelle, California myotis, and Townsend’s big-eared bat—captured by Drew Stokes in two evenings of netting. Drew also saw a mountain lion!

 

The only downside to the week were the bug bites Lea and I got—possibly from two species of mites, including bites that look like chiggers. Lea got a bad case of chiggers in Camp Pendleton a couple of years ago. In my whole life I had never heard of chiggers in San Diego County. Is dealing with chiggers another price we must now pay for the warming climate?

 

Thanks to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife for sponsoring our study and Hans Sin for coordinating it.

 

Good birding,

 

Philip Unitt

San Diego


--
Brennan Mulrooney
Santee, CA

Buena Vista Audubon and Grande Pelagic Sunday Sept. 23, 2018

David Povey
 

The Buena Vista Audubon and Grande Pelagic  Sunday was a great success. Bird species of note included Least Storm-Petrel,

Masked/Nazca Booby, Red Billed Tropicbird, Long-tailed Jaegers, Craveri's Murrelets.

We found a large raft of storm-petrels on the Thirty Mile Bank. The makeup of 700-800 Black Storm-Petrels and 100 plus

Least Storm-Petrels. This about 26 nautical miles west of Ocean Beach.

A immature Masked/ Nazca Booby was well seen and photographed on the Nine Mile Bank near

the end of the trip. This bird about a half mile north of the border and 11 n.m. s.w. of Point Loma, This sighting continues a

long string of white bodied booby reports for 2017-2018.

A close in Red-billed Tropicbird was on the water over the San Diego Trough early in the day perhaps 15 n.m. southwest of

Point Loma. This species has been rather scarce this year.

Long- tailed Jaegers best considered rare locally inside San Clemente Is. were in exceptional numbers with at least five.

We had three adults fly right in to the chummed gull flock for nice photo opportunities. All Long-tailed Jaegers seen from the

Nine Mile Bank or further offshore.

Three pairs of Craveri's Murrelets were found. One pair allowed close approach for photos. Two of the pairs were in the expected

area of the Thirty Mile Bank. The last pair, I. D. form photos, was surprisingly inshore on the inner edge of the Nine Mile. Likely

8 n.m. or less from Point Loma.

A partial list;

Greater White-fronted Goose  30+  (high V seen off Point Loma).

Northern Fulmar   3

Pink-footed Shearwater   27

Sooty Shearwater   2

Black-vented Shearwater   110

Leach's Storm-Petrel chapmani   2

Ashy Storm-Petrel    4

Black Storm-Petrel   850

Least Storm-Petrel   120

Red-billed Tropicbird    1

Masked /Nazca Booby   1

Brown Booby    5

Red-necked Phalarope    27

Red Phalarope    4

Pomarine Jaeger   5

Parasitic Jaeger   3

Long-tailed Jaeger  5

jaeger sp.   1

Craveri's Murrelet   6

Sabine's Gull   3

Common Tern    10

Elegant Tern   225

 

Dave Povey

Dulzura

 

p.s. The last 2018 Buena Vista Audubon and Grande Pelagic is Oct. 21, 2018. For reservations call 619 222-1144 or log on

to www.hmlanding.com .  See trip details and reports at www.sandiegopelagics.com.

 

 

 

 

FRNC - lots interesting birds, Sep 24, 2018

Gary Nunn
 

At Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery this morning and a good show of rarer migrants.

American Redstart, imm male, and Tennessee Warbler, both found by Jim Pawlicki.

Chestnut-sided Warbler and two Clay-colored Sparrows found by John Sterling. Also a bright a Cassin’s Vireo and MacGillivray’s Warbler.

Northeast section seems most lively with migrant warblers.

White-winged Dove at the point, Cabrillo National Monument, also by Jim Pawlicki.

Gary Nunn,
Pacific Beach.

Re: FRNC - lots interesting birds, Sep 24, 2018

John Sterling
 

Gary just found a black and white and I found a blackburnian in Northern most trees on cemetery. More birds to be found. 



John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695


John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

On Sep 24, 2018, at 10:19 AM, Gary Nunn <garybnunn@...> wrote:

At Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery this morning and a good show of rarer migrants.

American Redstart, imm male, and Tennessee Warbler, both found by Jim Pawlicki.

Chestnut-sided Warbler and two Clay-colored Sparrows found by John Sterling.  Also a bright a Cassin’s Vireo and MacGillivray’s Warbler.

Northeast section seems most lively with migrant warblers.

White-winged Dove at the point, Cabrillo National Monument, also by Jim Pawlicki.

Gary Nunn,
Pacific Beach.